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To Fly or Not to Fly Katie Lowe, Roger Williams University, Science: Flight and Motion, 4 th grade level [email protected] For the Teacher For the Student For the Teacher Lesson Overview Targeted Standards Formative Assessment

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To fly or not to fly l.jpg

To Fly or Not to Fly

Katie Lowe,

Roger Williams University,

Science: Flight and Motion,

4th grade level

[email protected]

For the Teacher

For the Student


For the teacher l.jpg
For the Teacher

  • Lesson Overview

  • Targeted Standards

  • Formative Assessment

  • Lesson Organization(Opening, Developing, Closing)

  • Materials, Resources, Credits

  • Enrichment and Accommodations

For the Student


Lesson overview l.jpg
Lesson Overview

  • Students will learn how to create, modify and improve a paper glider so it will be capable of achieving flight.

  • In groups of 3-4, they will construct a glider out of paper with their own design.

  • Through multiple trials (at least 5) they will modify the glider so it will remain in the air longer and reach further distances.

  • They will record their modifications, as well as the results of the flight (time and distance).

  • They will present their modifications, and best times and distances to the class in a class discussion.

  • They will write 2-3 paragraphs in their scientist notebooks about their recordings, modifications and observations of the lesson.

For the Teacher


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Targeted Standards

Students will be expected to (know):

  • S(PS3)-2-2.1: Describe the many different ways things can move, such as in a straight line, zigzag or circular motion, back and forth, and fast and slow.

  • S(PS3)-2-2.2: Describe and demonstrate how the position and motion of an object can be changed by applying force, such as pushing and pulling, and explain that the greater the force, the greater the change.

  • S(PS3)-4-2.1: Use data to predict how a change in force (greater/less) might affect the position, direction of motion, or speed of an object (e.g., ramps and balls)

  • F Motion: Changes in speed or direction of motion are caused by forces. The greater the force is, the greater the change in motion will be. The more massive an object is, the less effect a given force will have.

  • Content Standard B:

  • An object's motion can be described by tracing and measuring its position over time.

  • The position and motion of objects can be changed by pushing or pulling. The size of the change is related to the strength of the push or pull.

For the Teacher


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Formative Assessment

  • The students will be monitored throughout their modifications and improvements on the gliders.

    Students will be assessed by:

  • Their individual paragraphs in their scientist notebooks on their recordings, observations and modifications to see if they understand how flight and motion work, and what steps need to be taken to improve the glider.

    • If modifications were made

    • If improvements were made

  • How well they worked together in groups.

  • The hand-outs that should be individually completed during the lesson by recording the different trial outcomes and modifications.

For the Teacher


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Opening the Lesson

  • Ask essential questions:

    • Has anyone ever flown before?

    • How do you think the world would be different without the opportunity to fly?

    • How do you think objects fly or glide?

  • Read “To Fly: The Story of the Wright Brothers” by Wendie Old.

  • Give directions of lesson.

    • Make a paper glider that will fly for a long period of time and reach a far distance.

    • Make at least five modifications to try to improve the timing and distance of the glider.

  • Hand out material.

  • Get into groups and begin to make paper gliders.

  • Time: 30 minutes

For the Teacher


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Developing the Lesson

  • Create paper glider in their groups.

  • (Record all measurements and modifications on hand-out)

  • Measure the distance and time of trial 1. (record data)

  • Make modifications. (record data)

  • Measure the distance and time of trial 2. (record data)

  • Make modifications. (record data)

  • Measure the distance and time of trial 3. (record data)

  • Make modifications. (record data)

  • Measure the distance and time of trial 4. (record data)

  • Make modifications. (record data)

  • Measure the distance and time of trial 5. (record data)

  • Time: 30 minutes

For the Teacher


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Closing the Lesson

  • Clean up.

  • Class discussion.

    • Discuss best times and distances.

    • Discuss the different modifications each groups made.

      Homework: The students will individually write 2-3 paragraphs in their scientist notebooks about the results of the experiment. Include the times and distances. Also, mention the different modifications made and how they effected the flight of the paper gliders through personal observations. This will be done at home.

      Time: 10 minutes

For the Teacher


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Materials, Resources, Credits

  • Materials:

    • Hand-out

    • Sheets of paper

    • Paper clips

    • Scissors

    • Tape

    • Glue

    • Stop watch

    • Measuring tape

  • Resources: “To Fly: The Story of the Wright Brothers” by Wendie Old

  • Sources:Next Generation Tools for Standard-Based Teaching CD

For the Teacher


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Enrichment and Accommodations

  • Enrichment Activities:

  • Writing 2-3 paragraphs in their scientist notebooks about conclusions and observations of the different modifications and trials.

  • Designing paper glider in their groups.

    • Use imaginations, problem-solving techniques and creativity

  • Accommodations:

  • Working in small groups allows students to help each other where someone may need extra accommodations.

For the Teacher


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For the Student

Introduction

Learning Goals

Assessment

Learning Activity

Enrichment

For the Teacher


Introduction l.jpg
Introduction

  • You will get to experience what is was like to be the famous “Wright Brothers,” by designing your very own glider! Your uniquely designed glider will be made from paper! After its first flight has taken off from the force of your throwing arm, you will record its duration in the air with a stop watch, its distance with measuring tape and any other observations you made. You will have to figure out what makes the glider fly in the air longer and reach further distances, such as adjusting the wings or adding weight. After modifications are made you will let it fly again and record the new findings. This process of modification will be repeated until you have 5 different trials. Keep in mind that being a “Wright Brother” is not easy! It takes imagination and creativity to achieve success! Let’s see if your glider is “to fly or not to fly…….”

For the Student


Learning goals l.jpg
Learning Goals

You will be expected to know:

  • Objects can move differently

    • speed

    • direction

  • An object’s motion can be described by tracing and measuring its position over time.

  • The position and motion of objects can be changed by pushing or pulling, and that the size of the change is directly related to the strength of the push or pull.

For the Student


Assessment l.jpg
Assessment

  • You will be monitored throughout the lesson, focusing on the modifications and improvements on the gliders.

    You will be assessed by:

  • How well you worked together and cooperated in groups.

  • Hand-outs that should be individually completed during the lesson by recording the different trial outcomes and modifications.

  • Individual 2-3 paragraphs in their scientist notebooks on the recordings, observations and modifications to see if you understood how flight and motion work, and what steps needed to be taken to improve the glider.

    • If modifications were made

    • If improvements were made

For the Student


Learning activity l.jpg
Learning Activity

  • You will be provided with:

  • Verbal instructions.

  • Detailed directions on hand-out.

  • Hand-out for recording trial outcomes and modifications.

  • Activities:

  • Listen to: ‘To Fly: The Story of the Wright Brothers” by Wendie Old.

  • Design and make paper glider in groups of 3-4. (design your own)

  • Record time in air and distance where landed.

  • Make at least 4 more modifications and record time, distance, and modification after each trial.

  • Class discussion about each group’s modifications, and best times and distances.

  • Write 2-3 paragraphs in scientist notebooks on observations and conclusions of the modifications and different trials.

For the Student


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Enrichment

  • Designing and making the paper gliders involves your imagination and creativity.

  • Writing in your scientific notebooks allows you to express your feelings, ideas, observations and conclusions on the overall lesson, trials and modifications.

For the Student


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