Timmy
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Timmy Service Dog Providing medical assistance Therapy Dog Providing comfort to others Kiwanian Providing service to the community

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Timmy l.jpg
Timmy

  • Service DogProviding medical assistance

    • Therapy Dog Providing comfort to others

      • KiwanianProviding service to the community


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Service Dog means any guide dog, signal dog or other dog individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. This including but not limited to guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders, providing minimal rescue or protection work, pulling a wheelchair or fetching dropped items or seizure or other medical alerts.

“If they meet this definition, animals are considered service animals under the ADA regardless of whether they have been licensed or certified by a state or local government.”

Timmy the Service Dog


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People with disabilities who use service animals cannot be charged extra fees, isolated from other patrons, or treated less favorably than other patrons.

Businesses that sell or prepare food must allow service animals in public areas even if state or local health codes prohibit animals on the premises.

A business is not required to provide care or food for a service animal or provide a special location for it to relieve itself.

Allergies and fear of animals are generally not valid reasons for denying access or refusing service to people with service animals.

Remember service animals are working animals, not pets.


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Service dogs come in all shapes and sizes. It really depends on the type work they do.

Guide dogs which are most well know of service dogs are larger breeds and wear a harness when working.


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Service Dog Etiquette on the type work they do.You’re not dealing with just a dog

  • Please speak first to the person.

    It’s correct human and canine manners!

  • Petting the service dog.

    Do not touch either the service dog or its person without first asking permission.

    Touching the service dog might distract it from its work. Touching the person might be interpreted as assault (by the dog).

  • Feeding the service dog.

    Resist the temptation to offer treats to the service dog.

  • Barking, meowing, whistling, and making other rude noises at the service dog.

    Don’t. You’ll look silly.


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Conversing with the person about the on the type work they do. service dog, disabilities, etc.

Questions of a personal nature should be avoided. If the person volunteers information, you may decide if you wish to continue the conversation. Don’t feel offended if the person declines to talk about themselves or the service dog - not everyone wants to be a walking "show and tell" exhibit.

What if you don’t like dogs or are afraid of dogs?

Place yourself away from the service dog. If you are a business person, discreetly arrange for someone else to wait on the person. You may ask the person to have the service dog lie down if it does not interfere with its work.


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  • What if the service dog barks, growls, or otherwise forgets its manners?

    Find out what happened before taking action. Was the service dog stepped on, poked, asleep and dreaming, performing its job (some alert their owners to oncoming seizures by barking once or twice)? If the dog’s behavior is disruptive or destructive, you may ask the person to remove it from the premises..

  • What if other people complain about the dog being present?

    Explain that the service dog is medically necessary and that federal law protects the right of the person to be accompanied by the service animal/service dog in public places.


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Vonnie working Timmy at the Salvation Army feeding station at the Ground Zero Site. We only took this picture of Timmy working because we did not think it appropriate to be taking pictures on sacred ground.

Photo by Neil A. Young


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What is Timmy Worth? at the Ground Zero Site. We only took this picture of Timmy working because we did not think it appropriate to be taking pictures on sacred ground.

To me, Timmy is priceless, but if I could find another service dog with Timmy’s abilities, the average cost is $35,000. Many organizations only require $5,000 to $10,000 from the future handler and raises the rest through grants and donations.

Narcolepsy is not a task service dogs are generally trained for, seizure dogs would be closest type dog which could possibly be trained for my needs.

There are higher vet costs related to a service dog, because an ill dog cannot work, that leaves the handler out of commission also.


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TOP 10 DOG PET PEEVES ABOUT HUMANS at the Ground Zero Site. We only took this picture of Timmy working because we did not think it appropriate to be taking pictures on sacred ground.1. Blaming your farts on me... not funny... not very funny at all! 2. Yelling at me for barking... I'M A FRIGGIN' DOG YOU IDIOT! 3. Taking me for walks, then not letting me check stuff out. Exactly whose walk is this anyway? 4. Any trick that involves balancing food on my nose... stop it! 5. Any haircut that involves bows or ribbons. Now you know why we chew your stuff up when you're not home. 6. The sleight of hand, fake fetch throw. You fooled a dog! What a proud moment for the top of the food chain. 7. Taking me to the vet for "the big snip", then acting surprised when I freak out every time we go back. 8. Getting upset when I sniff the crotches of your guests. Sorry, but I haven't quite mastered that handshake thing yet. 9. How you act disgusted when I lick myself. Look, we both know the truth, you're just jealous. 10. Dog sweaters. Have you noticed the fur?


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