Jean louis weber european environment agency jean louis weber@eea europa eu
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International Payments for Ecosystem Services (IPES) Publication Review Meeting UNEP, Geneva, 28-29 January 2008 W orkshop on ecosystem accounting An introduction to ecosystem accounting. Jean-Louis Weber European Environment Agency [email protected]

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Jean louis weber european environment agency jean louis weber@eea europa eu

International Payments for Ecosystem Services (IPES) Publication Review MeetingUNEP, Geneva, 28-29 January 2008Workshop on ecosystem accountingAn introduction to ecosystem accounting

Jean-Louis WeberEuropean Environment [email protected]


SEEA2003: expansion of the System of National Accounts (UN SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

RM HASSAN - UN The System of Environmental and Economic Accounting (UN 2003) -

RANESA Workshop June 12-16, 2005 Maputo


Ecosystem approach to seea
Ecosystem approach to SEEA SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

  • SEEA2003 revision by 2010

  • EEA-UNSD international workshop on land & ecosystem accounting, Nov. 2006

  • EEA proposal to UNCEEA and London Group for developing the ecosystem dimension into the SEEA

    • Clarification paper (LG, Rome, Dec. 2007)

    • Drafting of a specific handbook (first draft LG Brussels, Sept. 2008)

  • Additional SEEA module + definition of new aggregates “beyond GDP”


The questions behind ecological truth market prices in the sna 1
The questions behind: SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspectsEcological truth & market prices in the SNA (1)

  • Risks of unsustainable use of the living natural capital are ignored:

    • The negative impacts of over-harvesting, force-feeding with fertilisers or Nitrogen depositions, intoxication with pesticides or pollution, introduction of species, fragmentation by roads, or soil sealing by urban development have no direct monetary counterpart.

    • This is the case for private capital and even more for public goods(The tragedy of the Commons).

  • The natural capital is not even amortised in the national accounts and in accounting books of companies :

    • No allowance is made for maintaining ecosystems’ critical functions and services.

    • The full cost of domestic products is not covered in many cases by their price. We don't pay for the full price of our consumption.


Ecological truth market prices in the sna 2
Ecological truth & market prices in the SNA (2) SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

  • The price of imported products does not reflect the full costs of ecosystems degradation in originating countries.

    • Delocalisation of industrial production is de facto recorded as a “green” performance in importing countries when in many cases it increases the degradation of the global ecosystem (e.g. CO2 emissions higher because of old technologies, loss of biodiversity because ecosystems are less protected).

  • The actual value for people of free ecosystem services is not accounted (the market tells: price is zero).

    • Increase of wellbeing resulting from economic growth is not balanced with losses of free services (commercialisation of previously free services, depletion, ecosystem degradation...).


Current situation with seea2003
Current situation with SEEA2003 SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

  • SEEA2003 fully integrated with SNA but

    • relations to nature are scattered between chapters and unevenly developed.

  • Ecosystems assets are indeed part of SEEA 2003 structure: forest, water, land and ecosystem accounts, soil (p.m.), fisheries but

    • few links exist between these assets, considered more as a collection of inventories than interacting systems.

    • “ecosystem service” is not a well identified concept

  • Flows between the economic system and the ecosystems are asymmetric, balancing the economic system (backed up by SNA) with a mere interface (“environment” column, “ecosystem inputs”)‏

    • No place for feedbacks

  • Unclear measurement of the value of nature

 Develop the ecosystem approach into the SEEA


Developing the ecosystem approach into the seea improving integration
Developing the ecosystem approach into the SEEA SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspectsImproving integration

  • Recognize first the interaction of 2 co-evolving systems

  • Clarify the concept of natural capital by separating non-renewable resources (where the rent and its reinvestment is the interest) from renewable resource (for which the conservation of critical level of stocks in good functioning state is main issue).

  • Full integration vs. dual integration

  • Renew approach of valuation with clear distinction of values, costs and their role in decision processes


Logic underlying the millennium ecosystem assessment
Logic underlying the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment… SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

Minimum levels of service (service limits)

Biophysical structure or process

(e.g. woodland habitat or net primary productivity )

Function

(e.g. slow passage of water, or biomass)

Service

(e.g. flood protection, or harvestable products)

Benefit

(e.g. willingness to pay for woodland protection or for more woodland, or harvestable products)

Limit pressures via policy action?

Maintenance, restoration

Σ Pressures

Courtesy Roy Haines-Young


Developing the ecosystem approach in the seea back to the 4 questions
Developing the ecosystem approach in the SEEA SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspectsBack to the 4 questions

  • is the renewable natural capital maintained over time at the amount and quality expected by the society?  physical measurement of “quantityquality” in reference to stated social norms

  • is the full cost of maintaining the natural capital covered by the price of goods and services?  measurement of costs not currently covered for maintaining and restoring domestic ecosystems (provision for depreciation) and addition to value of goods and services

  • is the full cost of ecosystems services covered by import prices?  calculation andaddition to value of goods and services

  • is the total of goods and services supplied to final uses by the market (and government institutions) and for free by ecosystems, developing over time?  measure and value free end use services and add these benefits to GDP


Accounting for full ecosystem benefits costs

Ignored Costs SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

Ignored Benefits

(B) Additional costs necessary to maintain & restore ecosystems up to policy objectives

GDP

(A) Final Use of

Non-Market

Ecosystem

Services

Ecosystem

Services

Ecosystem Assets

(Stocks, flows, resilience)‏

(C) Full ecosystem cost of imports

Accounting for full ecosystem benefits & costs


Beyond the gdp with ecosystem accounting 1
Beyond the GDP with ecosystem accounting (1) SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspects

  • Stepwise approach to inclusive wealth calculation:

    • Includes socio-economic features but with an ecosystem focus (human and social capital just partly addressed)

    • Costs and benefits recorded separately

  • Natural capital accounts in physical units:

    • Stocks, flows, resilience, services

    • Ecosystem state benchmarked against stated policy targets

       Net Landscape Ecological Potential, HANPP, E. Footprint


From land cover to ecosystem at macro scale net landscape ecological potential 2000 1 km grid
From Land cover to ecosystem at macro scale: SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspectsNet Landscape Ecological Potential 2000, 1 km² grid

NLEP =

(Vegetation+Nature Value)

----------------------------------

Fragmentation

Source: EEA/ETCLUSI from GBLI, NATURILIS and MEFF

Methodology: EEA/ETCLUSI


Net landscape ecological potential 2000 aggregated by regions
Net Landscape Ecological Potential 2000, SNA1993) in order to include more environmental aspectsaggregated by regions

Source: EEA/ETCLUSI from GBLI/CLC, NATURILIS and MEFF

Methodology: EEA/ETCLUSI


Change 1990 2000 in net landscape ecological potential nlep 1 km grid
Change 1990-2000 in Net Landscape Ecological Potential (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Source: EEA/ETCLUSI from GBLI, NATURILIS and MEFF

Methodology: EEA/ETCLUSI


Beyond the gdp with ecosystem accounting 2
Beyond the GDP with ecosystem accounting (2) (NLEP), 1 km² grid

  • Computation of additional ecosystems maintenance & restoration costs for meeting policy targets

    • Domestic ecosystems: allowance for depreciation, to be covered in the next period; virtual domestic debt

    • + Ecosystems in countries from which Ecosystem Services originate: hidden costs in imports; virtual foreign debt

  • Full Cost of Goods & Services

  • Valuation and integration of non-market end use ecosystem services with GDP

  • Inclusive Domestic Product


Accounting for environmental benefits costs

IDP (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Ecosystem Services

Stocks & flows (quantities)

Resilience/Health (qualities)

FCGS

Costs

Accounting for environmental benefits & costs

Benefits: the Demand side

GDP + Final Use of Ecosystem Services = IDP

Final Services

Inclusive Domestic Product

+

(Intermediate consumption)

+

Additional maintenance cost of the resource

+

Costs of restoration from ecosystem degradation

+

Full ecosystem cost of imports

Costs: the Supply side

Ecosystem Assets

Full Cost of Goods & Services


Seea integrating ecosystems

Physical flows (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Monetary flows/valuation

Assets valuation

Material & Energy Flows

Ecosystem Services

SNA flows & assets

SEEA Integrating Ecosystems

Natural capital / assets

Rest of the World

Subsoil Assets

[stocks]

Ecosystem Assets

[stocks and resilience]

Subsoil Assets

[stocks]

Ecosystem Assets

[stocks and resilience]

Ecosystem Services

NAMEA

Additional Ecosystem Maintenance Costs

Environmental Expenditures, Taxes

Additional Ecosystem Costs

in Imports

(less

in Exports)


Spatially integrated ecosystem accounts

Production (NLEP), 1 km² grid &

Consumption

Atmosphere/

Climate

Economic

Assets

Water system

Infrastructures

& Technologies

Population

CORE LAND COVER ACCOUNT

Flora & Fauna

Soil

Spatially integrated ecosystem accounts

Inclusive use of market & non market ecosystem services

Ecosystem

services

Ecosystem

assets

Land use

economic & social

functions

Stocks

Material & energy flows

Resilience

Intensity of use & full maintenance costs

ECOSYSTEM ACCOUNTS


Framework of ecosystem accounts
Framework of Ecosystem Accounts (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Spatial integration

Economic sectors

Accounts of flows of ecosystem goods and services

Core accounts of assets & flows

(by ecosystem types, raw quantities)

Material/energy flows

(biomass, water, nutrients, residuals)

  • Ecosystem Services

  • Marketed Ecosystem Services (€)

  • Non-market end use ES (physical units, €)

Supply & use of ecosystem goods and services

(Use of resource by sectors, supply to consumption & residuals, accumulation, I-O analysis, NAMEA)

Counts of stocks diversity / integrity

(by ecosystem types, focus on state, health, resilience, stress)

Ecosystem types

  • Natural capital

  • Natural capital stocks, resilience & wealth, distance to objective (physical units, by sectors)

  • Natural capital consumption/maintenance costs (€)

  • Ecosystem assets inclusive wealth (€)

Ecosystem Stocks & State Accounts

Natural Capital Accounts/ living & cycling natural capital

Economic integration


Framework of ecosystem accounts1

(NLEP), 1 km² grid

Framework of Ecosystem Accounts

Spatial integration

Economic sectors

Accounts of flows of ecosystem goods and services

Core accounts of assets & flows

(by ecosystem types, raw quantities)

Material/energy flows

(biomass, water, nutrients, residuals)

  • Ecosystem Services

  • Marketed Ecosystem Services (€)

  • Non-market end use ES (physical units, €)

Supply & use of ecosystem goods and services

(Use of resource by sectors, supply to consumption & residuals, accumulation, I-O analysis, NAMEA)

Counts of stocks diversity / integrity

(by ecosystem types, focus on state, health, resilience, stress)

Ecosystem types

  • Natural capital

  • Natural capital stocks, resilience & wealth, distance to objective (physical units, by sectors)

  • Natural capital consumption/maintenance costs (€)

  • Ecosystem assets inclusive wealth (€)

Ecosystem Stocks & State Accounts

Natural Capital Accounts/ living & cycling natural capital

Economic integration


Stocks flows

 Basic ecosystem stock flows accounts (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Stocks & flows

  • Spatial systems:

    • Land cover (units, zones, landscape types)

    • Rivers, river reaches, catchments

    • Coastal systems

    • Soil

  • Biomass (NPP/NEP), Carbon

  • Nutrients (N,P…)

  • Water

  • Species

  • Other…


Data infrastructure of land cover accounts
Data infrastructure of land cover accounts (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Smallest mapping unit for stock 25ha

Change mapped at 5ha



Leac from changes to flows of land cover

Change Matrix (NLEP), 1 km² grid

(44x43=1932 possible changes)

summarized into flows

LCF8

LCF5

LCF1

LCF6

LCF4

LCF2

LCF3

LCF7

LCF9

LEAC: from changes to flows of land cover

2000

1990


Ecosystem health counts of health resilience
Ecosystem health: counts of health/resilience (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Ecosystem Distress Syndrome model: 5 types of symptoms

  • Vigor: e.g. disruptions of nutrients cycling, population dynamics (loss or excess)

  • Organisation, degradation of substrates: e.g. fragmentation, water stress, change in food chain

  • Resilience: e.g. change in species composition (invasive…), intoxication

  • Dependence of systems from artificial input: e.g energy, water, subsidies

  • Capacity of supporting healthy communities: wildlife, human

Source: David J. Rapport


Land use functions ecosystem services
Land Use Functions (NLEP), 1 km² grid & Ecosystem Services

  • LUF analysis and mapping

  • address cross-cutting issues e.g.:Urban/Rural, Agro/Environment

  • detect & measure ES services = ecosystem functions which benefit to people, somewhere



Ecosystems services

Services (NLEP), 1 km² grid

Capital stocks and functions

Nomenclature of ES

Ecosystems services

Market values

Physical measurement and shadow prices


Exemple es nomenclature used for wetland accounts 1st draft
Exemple: ES nomenclature used for wetland accounts (NLEP), 1 km² grid – 1st draft


Challenges for implementation
Challenges for implementation (NLEP), 1 km² grid

  • Classification and measurement

  • Geographical scales

    The issue is to play with heterogeneous datasets:

    • Exhaustive but rather contents-poor geographic datasets, frequently updated by satellite images

    • Exhaustive, contents-rich but rather poorly geographically detailed socio-economic statistics

    • Scattered in situ monitoring of the physical world

    • Detailed analysis and modelling of the socio-ecosystems and valuation of ecosystem services available as case studies

  • Time scales

    • Time series

    • Nowcasting

    • Infra-annual accounts when relevant

    • Ecological “surprises”


  • Es several valuation issues
    ES: several valuation issues (NLEP), 1 km² grid

    • Services entangled in marketed goods and services:

      • Under pricing because of externalisation of environmental costs

      • Under pricing because of low internalisation of environmental benefits

      • Under pricing because of rent appropriation by buyers (in particular in imports)

    • Free end use ES:

      • Physical measurement from social statistics

      • Prices for individual use

      • Prices for collective use (in particular regulating ES)

      • Limit to what is not in price/value of commodities (full property right criteria)

    • Additional maintenance & restoration costs of ecosystems

      • Integrated measurement of quantity & quality of ecosystems

      • Costs in imports (e.g. when products are re-exported)


    Not only issues achievements
    Not only issues, achievements (NLEP), 1 km² grid

    The first phase of GAISP comprises the publication of the following eight

    Monographs:

    1 The Value of Timber, Carbon, Fuelwood, and Non-Timber Forest Produce in India’s Forests

    2 Estimating the Value of Agricultural Cropland and Pasture Land in India

    3 The Value of India’s Sub-Soil Assets

    4 Eco-tourism and Biodiversity Values in India

    5 Estimating the Value of Educational Capital Formation in India

    6 Investments in Health and Pollution Control and their Value to India

    7 Accounting for the Ecological Services of Indian Forests: Soil Conservation, Water Augmentation, and Flood Prevention

    8 Estimating the Value of Freshwater Resources in India

    In this monograph, three ecological services of forest ecosystems, namely, prevention of soil erosion, augmentation of groundwater, and reduction of flood damage have been considered.


    Perspectives for ecosystem accounting
    Perspectives for ecosystem accounting (NLEP), 1 km² grid

    • Correlated regional projects like Eureca!2012 the ecosystem assessment for Europe (now regional project of the forthcoming MA2 (2015) launched by UNEP)

    • “Beyond GDP” developments

    • Assessment of benefits provided by biodiversity demanded by the G8+5 in Potsdam, March 2007 as an input to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) – cases studies on wetlands (EEA) and forest (IUCN)

    • Ecosystem and carbon accounting, continuation of the “Stern report”

    • Possible interest of EA for business (e.g. UNEP Financial Initiative), IPES – can it help?


    Work sharing for a fast track implementation international level
    Work sharing for a fast track implementation/ International level

    • UN agencies, WB, IMF, OECD (…?)

    • MA2 context (e.g. WCMC/UNEP: manual on ES currently drafted)

    • GEO/GEOSS (GMES…) (support regional global monitoring)

    • International conventions (CBD, IPCC, IGBP, HDP, Ramsar, Desertification… )

    • Regional regulations, agreements, conventions

    • Key NGOs in the domain (IUCN, WWF, ISEE)

    • UNEP-IPES, UNEP-FI

    • London group/subgroup + Eurostat + EEA & scientific expert panel: issue paper, outline by end 2008


    Thanks
    Thanks! level


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