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SKETCHING and LETTERING Print multiple handouts on one page to save paper Select File – Print Edit the following selections to read: Select the OK button Example Freehand Sketch for Concept Development Supplies Required HB lead in a 0.7mm pencil (medium grade) Eraser

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Sketching and lettering l.jpg

SKETCHINGandLETTERING

Print multiple handouts on one page to save paper

Select File – Print

Edit the following selections to read:

Select the OK button



Supplies l.jpg
Supplies

  • Required

    • HB lead in a 0.7mm pencil (medium grade)

    • Eraser

    • 8.5” x 11” Engineering Paper (Green)

      • Five blocks per inch

  • Recommended

    • 6H wooden pencil for light lines, i.e., construction lines


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Why is Sketching Important?

  • Fast way to get from mental image to hard copy so ideas can be shared.

  • Most designs start with numerous sketches as part of the iterative process.

  • May be situations where its crucial to be able to produce neat accurate sketches (I.e. meetings, business dinners) no computer available!


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Objectives of Sketching

  • Freehand sketches are used to communicate with others, so they should be neat and correctly prepared.

    • Legibility

      • must be able to read and interpret

    • Accuracy

      • valid and convey proper size or shape

    • Neatness

      • no smudges, rips, etc...

  • Fast

    • time is money

  • Economical


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Exercise

  • On the back of this packet, sketch the following:

    • Horizontal line

    • Vertical line

    • Angled line

    • Circle

    • Sketch several more lines making some darker than others.

  • Looking at the lines you just sketched, answer the following questions:

    • How horizontal is the horizontal line?

    • How vertical is the vertical line?

    • How straight is the angled line?

    • How round is the circle?

    • How did you do creating some lines darker than others?


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Good Sketching Techniques

  • Communicate subject clearly.

  • Sketches should be proportional (scale not as important).

  • Use different line weights (thicknesses) to show the relative importance of different lines.

    • Correct grade of lead helps to create good quality sketches.

    • Object lines should be thick and black, so they stand out from the dimensions, notes, and other lines.

      • However, it is best to sketch lightly to get proper size and proportions before darkening the lines. (Having trouble, try a 6H wooden pencil.)

    • Use two different diameter pencils (0.7mm vs. 0.3mm)

    • Lean pencil to achieve different line thickness

    • Use short overlapping strokes


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Sketching Lines

  • Great descriptions and examples on page 57 (MGC) – Practical Tips Drawing freehand lines


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Problems?

  • Check out

    • Practical Tips Freehand lines, page 56.

    • Figure 3.7 Technique of Lines, page 59

    • Figure 3.8 Contrast of Lines, page 59


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Exercise

  • On a piece of engineering graph paper, using short overlapping strokes sketch the following:

    • Horizontal line

    • Vertical line

    • Angled line

    • Sketch several more lines making some darker than others.

  • Looking at the lines you just sketched, answer the following questions:

    • How horizontal is the horizontal line?

    • How vertical is the vertical line?

    • How straight is the angled line?

    • How did you do creating some lines darker than others?

  • Which method did you have more control over – solid line or a line consisting of short overlapping strokes?


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Sketching Circles and Arcs

  • Circles

    • MGC: Step by Step 3.1, page 60

    • Use Method A, B or C

  • Use light pencil strokes for construction and darken when you are satisfied with appearance

    • Instructor must be able to see LIGHT construction lines

  • Arcs

    • MGC: Step by Step 3.3, page 62

    • Carefully locate tangencies

    • Sketch curves first and then add straight lines tangent to them. This is easier than trying to make a curve tangent to straight lines.


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Sketching Lines Tangent to an Arc

  • Locate the center of a lightly sketched circle or arc.

  • Lightly sketch in the lines to which the arc is tangent.

  • Lightly sketch a line perpendicular to each line through the center of the arc or circle.

  • Lightly sketch circle through tangent points

  • Darken arc and lines.


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Exercise

  • On a piece of engineering graph paper, using short overlapping strokes sketch several circles and arcs.

  • Looking at the circles and arcs you just sketched, how round are the circles and arcs?

  • Which method did you have more control over – solid or a circle/arc consisting of short overlapping strokes?

  • Connect several circles with lines and locate the tangent points.

  • Darken appropriately.


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Alphabet of Lines

  • Line patterns communicate what the line represents in the drawing

  • Line patterns tell you information such as whether the line is hidden, visible, or a centerline (Figure 3.6 page 58 MGC)


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Alphabet of Lines

Thick

Thin

Thin

Thin

Thin

Thick

Thin

Thin

Thick

Thin


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Appropriate Line Weights

Incorrect

Correct


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Contrast of Lines

Figure 3.8 Contrast of Lines


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Technique of Lines

Figure 3.7 Technique of Lines


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Scale

  • Sketches are not usually made to a particular scale.

  • It is important to keep the sketch in proportion

  • Use grid paper or estimate proportions by comparison


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Sketch Large Features,Then Add Small Details

  • Look at overall dimensions and lightly block in.

  • Block in secondary details lightly.

  • Add final details

  • Darken sketch.



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Enlarging Proportions

  • Lay a grid over existing picture

  • Draw larger grid

  • Look at each portion of the object. How does it enter and exit each grid box.

  • Sketch in lightly in enlarged boxes


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Sketch the Figure BelowHands-On 3.1, page 64, GMC


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Additional Practice

  • Worksheet 3.3 at back of text.


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Sketching Summary

  • Almost all engineering designs start with simple sketches!

  • Quality is one of the most important aspects of sketching.

  • Sketched lines should be bold freehand lines. Do NOT use a straight edge.

  • The subject of the sketch should stand out clearly.

  • Using the correct lead grades and good techniques for sketching will help your sketches look their best.


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Lettering

  • Neat legible lettering is used to add dimensions and notes to sketches.

  • Poor lettering can ruin an otherwise good sketch.

  • Engineering lettering is usually drawn with HB or other relatively soft lead.

  • Use 1/8” uppercase Gothic single-stroke letters


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