Safe Zone Training

Safe Zone Training PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Instructions. Replace the graphics (e.g. logo), text (e.g. mission statement, resources, etc.) to reflect your group's Safe Zone training outline, brand, etc.. Our Mission . Friends and Allies of LGBTQ is committed to educating the TMCC community about the issues of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) communities. Through education, advocacy and awareness of LGBTQ issues, the program assists in promoting a safe and welcoming climate. The program, committee m15

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Safe Zone Training

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1. Safe Zone Training Date List of Presenter Names

3. Our Mission Friends and Allies of LGBTQ is committed to educating the TMCC community about the issues of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) communities. Through education, advocacy and awareness of LGBTQ issues, the program assists in promoting a safe and welcoming climate. The program, committee members and supporters strive: To provide Safe Zone training; To identify issues and concerns and provide recommendations for policies, programs, and initiatives for resolution; To provide educational materials and opportunities to the community. To ensure inclusion and equity in concert with TMCC's diversity strategic goal

4. Workshop Highlights Introduction/Expectations Self-Reflection Experiential Activity Definitions and Education Resources Becoming an Ally Questions & Evaluations

5. Index Cards Write a question you have about Safe Zone or Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender issues.

6. Self-Reflection Complete your worksheet privately These will not be shared or collected The wording of the questions is intentional

7. Expectations Everyone’s experience with diversity is different. This training is not a complete collection of every situation or experience that a gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender person may face. It is to help you in assisting LGBT people and creating a safe environment in your work environment

8. Expectations By attending this training, we hope you will be willing to: Confront social injustices of any kind and provide an environment for optimal learning. Use information and your skills to be a resource in making people feel valued and safe.  Understand how interactions with the LGBT community affects your community. Take this information and share it with others.

9. Expectations There are no dumb questions. This is meant to be an open learning environment where you ask questions and challenge “best practices.” Questions are to gain information on being supportive and understanding, not to force moral judgments or values onto others. For example, “Where can people go to learn how their religion views homosexuality?” vs. “Don’t you think you are going to hell for being gay?”

10. Experiential Activity Introductions Questions Discussion Provide two questions to each person in the group (same four questions for all groups). Provide two questions to each person in the group (same four questions for all groups).

11. Discuss In Your Groups… How did it feel to ask the questions? How did it feel to answer the questions? How did it feel when you “came out?” What was the most challenging? Were you able to answer the questions? Did you find yourself ever drawing from stereotypes when you didn’t know the answer? Did you find yourself ever drawing from stereotypes when you didn’t know the answer?

12. Definitions & Education Heterosexism Homophobia

13. Definitions & Education Heterosexism The assumption that all members of the community are heterosexual, includes the implications that are based on this assumption. Homophobia Homophobia refers to the fear and/or hatred directed toward possible homosexuality in others. Internalized homophobia refers to the self-loathing that some homosexual individuals experience.

14. Examples of Homophobia & Heterosexism Looking at a LGBT person and automatically thinking of their sexuality, rather than seeing her/him as a whole, complex person Changing your seat in a meeting because a LGBT person sits in the chair next to you Not asking about a LGBT person’s partner, although you regularly ask, “How is your husband (or boyfriend)?” when you run into a heterosexual friend Thinking that if a LGBT person is friendly or touches you, he/she is making sexual advances Assuming that everyone you meet is heterosexual

15. Examples of Homophobia & Heterosexism (continued) Feeling that a LGBT person is just a man/woman who couldn’t find a woman/man. Avoiding mentioning to your friends that you are involved with a LGBT rights organization because you are afraid they will think you are LGBT Not confronting a heterosexist or homophobic remark for fear of being identified with LGBT people

16. Riddle Scale of Homophobia 4 Negative Levels of Attitude 4 Positive Levels of Attitude Developed by Dorothy Riddle of Tucson, AZ

17. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Negative Levels Repulsion Homosexuality is seen as a “crime against nature.” Gays and lesbians are sick, crazy, immoral, sinful, wicked, etc. Anything is justified to change them: prison, hospitalization, negative behavior therapy, electroshock therapy, etc.

18. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Negative Levels Repulsion Pity Heterosexual chauvinism. Heterosexuality is more mature and certainly to be preferred. Any possibility of “becoming straight” should be reinforced, and those who seem to be born “that way” should be pitied, “poor dears.”

19. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Negative Levels Repulsion Pity Tolerance Homosexuality is just a phase of adolescent development that many people “grow out of.” Thus, lesbians and gay men are less mature than “straights” and should be treated with the protectiveness and indulgence one uses with a child. Lesbians and gays should not be given positions of authority because they are still working through their adolescent behavior.

20. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Negative Levels Repulsion Pity Tolerance Acceptance Still implies there is something to accept. Characterized by such statements as, “You’re not lesbian to me, you’re still a person!” or, “What you do in bed is your business,” or, “That’s fine with me as long as you don’t flaunt it!”

21. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Positive Levels Support The basic ACLU position. Work to safeguard the rights of lesbians and gays. People at this level may be uncomfortable themselves, but they are aware of the homophobic climate and the irrational unfairness.

22. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Positive Levels Support Admiration Acknowledges that being lesbian/gay in our society takes strength. People at this level are willing to truly examine their homophobic attitudes, values, and behaviors.

23. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Positive Levels Support Admiration Appreciation Value the diversity of people and see lesbians/gays as a valid part of that diversity. These people are willing to combat homophobia in themselves and others.

24. Riddle Scale of Homophobia Positive Levels Support Admiration Appreciation Nurturance Assumes that gay/lesbian people are indispensable in our society. They view lesbians/gays with genuine affection and delight, and are willing to be allies and advocates.

25. How Homophobia Hurts Us All Inhibits heterosexuals from forming close relationships with members of their own sex, for fear of being perceived as LGBT. Combined with sex-phobia, results in the invisibility or erasure of LGBT lives and sexuality in school-based education, keeping vital information from students. One cause of premature sexual involvement (increases the chance of teen pregnancy and the spread of STDs/STIs) as young people are often pressured to become sexually active to “prove” they are “normal.” Inhibits appreciation of diversity, making it unsafe for everyone because each person has unique traits not considered mainstream or dominant. We are all diminished when any one of us is demeaned Inhibits appreciation of diversity, making it unsafe for everyone because each person has unique traits not considered mainstream or dominant. We are all diminished when any one of us is demeaned

26. How Homophobia & Heterosexism Hurts “Out” LGBT People Rejection from friends, co-workers, family (including your children), neighbors, roommates, etc. People refusing to accept one’s sexual orientation, seeing it as a phase or something to change. Losing your job, your living space, financial support, and getting lower grades. Subtle rejection or distance from many people and having to wonder if it is real or not.

27. How Homophobia & Heterosexism Hurts “Closeted” LGBT People Having to lie and pretend. Can’t be affectionate with a loved one/having to pretend they are someone else-when not alone. Having people trying to “fix you up” with members of the opposite sex. Having a hard time finding/meeting other LGBT people. Thinking that something is wrong with you. Never feeling close or safe because of this secret. Feeling panic about being found out and feeling like a coward or feeling dishonest.

28. Resources Friends and Allies for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (GLBTQ) Issues Committee Human Rights Campaign - www.hrc.org Queer Student Union-University of Nevada, Reno Equity and Diversity Office Counseling Center You??? Learn more by visiting http://ally.tmcc.edu

29. Qualities of an Ally Understands people who may be different than themselves. Is committed to the personal growth required. Expects support from other allies. Is able to acknowledge and articulate how patterns of oppression have operated in their lives. Expects to make mistakes but does not use an excuse for non-action. Knows that both sides of an ally relationship have a responsibility for change whether or not persons on the other side choose to respond. Knows that in most ally relationships, it is the ally who initiated the change toward personal, institutional, and societal justice and equality. Knows that s/he is responsible for humanizing and taking an empowered role in society. Promotes a sense of community and teaches the importance of outreach. Has a good sense of humor.

30. Identifying a Safe Zone A Safe Zone is easily identifiable by the placement of the Safe Zone logo (to the left), typically found in or around an office or room gathering entrance. A Safe Zone means that each individual in an area has made a choice and received training in being an Ally.

31. Questions & Evaluations A Challenge: If people jump to the conclusion that you are LGBT because of your friendships or because you are reading LGBT publications or because you are being affectionate with someone of the same gender, resist your impulse to deny it. Challenge yourself to experience LGBT oppression rather than taking advantage of heterosexual privilege. Thank you for joining us!

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