Ayur veda life science
Advertisement
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 26

‘Ayur’‘veda’ – ‘Life’‘Science’ PowerPoint PPT Presentation

‘Ayur’‘veda’ – ‘Life’‘Science’. Udai SJC – 3 rd March Happy Holi Nikhil Rasiwasia. Ayurveda - Origins. Accurate dating is uncertain More objectively identifiable after the advent of Buddhism (c. 500 BC) Invasion of Darius, Alexander brought exchange

Download Presentation

‘Ayur’‘veda’ – ‘Life’‘Science’

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Ayur veda life science

‘Ayur’‘veda’ – ‘Life’‘Science’

Udai SJC – 3rd March

Happy Holi

Nikhil Rasiwasia


Ayurveda origins

Ayurveda - Origins

  • Accurate dating is uncertain

    • More objectively identifiable after the advent of Buddhism (c. 500 BC)

    • Invasion of Darius, Alexander brought exchange

  • Significant medical content can be found in Rig-Veda (presumed origin c. 1500 BC)

  • Early writings on perishable bhojpatra


Vedas

Vedas

  • It is the bedrock upon which Ayurveda rests

  • Considered to be composed around 1500-2000 BC

  • Four veda

    • Rig-veda : lots of stuff

    • Sam-veda : Soma sacrifice

    • Yajur-veda : entire sacrificial rite

    • Athar-veda : non-relegious (1200 BC), lots of medical text (fever, diarrhes, heart disease, jaundice, cough, leprosy)

  • Authoritative supplements

    • Brahmanas

    • Aranyakas (“the forest books", meaning treatises for sadhus living in the wilderness.)

    • Upnishads (self development spiritual text, philosophy, meditation, and the nature of God )


End of vedic period 500 bc

End of Vedic Period (500 BC)

  • Subsequent text deriving from primary vedic samhitas

    • Laid more emphasis on the dharma of self-development with explicit spiritual and philosophical content

  • Vedanta – derived from Upnishads

  • Ramayana

  • Mahabharat, Bhagavad Gita

  • Puranas – AD 320 to 520 - "tales of ancient times"


Ayurveda and buddhism

Ayurveda and Buddhism

  • Buddhism

    • attempt to purify, restructure and reform older vedic traditions.

    • Comfortable adopting Ayurveda

    • Jivaka, - Taxila’s outstanding Ayurvedic physician, buddha’s personal physicin

  • Ashoka (convert to buddhism established many charitable hospitals)

  • Spread of Buddhism == spread of Ayurveda

  • Nagarjuna – AD 100, brought about significant advances in Ayurveda – father of iatrochemistry – preparation of medicinal mineral substances


Westerm medicine and aurveda

Westerm Medicine and Aurveda

  • Hippocrates : Father of western medicine

    • Humoral theory – blood, phelgm, yellow bile, black bile

    • Dietary therapy, influence of seasons on health

  • Aristotle

    • Relied heavily on empirical observation and naturalistic classification

    • Four prime qualities: hot, cold, wet, dry

    • Four fundamental essence: air, water, fire, earth


Chinese medicine and ayurveda

Chinese medicine and ayurveda

  • Oldest extant chinese medical text – Huang-di Nei-jing or Inner classic of the Yellow Emperor (300 BC)

  • Similarities – because of exchange of ideas via Buddhism and trade.


Ayurveda and arab medicine unani tibb

Ayurveda and Arab Medicine (Unani Tibb)

  • Arab medicine by Avicenna (AD 980)

    • Produced Canon of Medicine, a compendium of the previous works of Hippocrates and Galen

  • Mostly based on Greek medicine (Unani)

  • Reports of exchange of ideas – Ayurvedic physicians were invited to baghdad to teach and organize hospitals


Earliest texts

Earliest Texts

  • 760 BC: Charaka Samhita – herbal or plant based pharmacopoeia

  • 660 BC: Sushruta Samhita – Surgival approaches

  • 7th Century : Ashtanga Sangraha of Vagbhata of Sindh – summary of previous two

  • AD 100: Nagarjuna – iatrochemistry

  • 1331: Madhava Nidana by Madhava of Kishkindha – Ayurvedic Diagnosis

  • 14th Century - Sarangadhara Samhita – Pulse Diagnosis


Ayurveda in 19 th century

Ayurveda in 19th Century

  • Ayurveda flourished till 12th century, till the Muslim invasion

  • Not much progress from 12th to 17th century

  • British invasion : 1833 virtually all ayurveda schools closed, opening of British medical schools

  • 1920: a national revival and resurgence of interest in traditional Indian culture and practices

  • 1946: Formal govt. recognition and reacceptance of Ayurveda and resurgence of research.

  • Currently, however it holds a secondary place in medicine in India

  • Indian govt. officially recognizes as legitimate: Allopathy, Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Unani Tibb, Ayurveda, and its cousins Siddha and Yoga.


Ayurveda vs western science

Ayurveda vs Western Science

  • Philosophy

    • W: treats discrete disease entities

    • A : treats subtle dysphoria, whose disruptive trends may later develop into discrete disease.

  • Diagnostic

    • W: scientific objectivity and verifiability (accumulating statistically significant data) – “experience-distant”

    • A : pratyaksha (perceptive understanding of each individual) – “experience-near”

  • Treatment

    • W: Linear logic, categorical and uses a classification system of disease.

    • A : Maintenance of optimal health by daily proactive care, continually modified according to seasonal changes

  • Belief

    • A : Individual has the innate capacity for potential self-correction and primary self healing


Why ayurveda

Why Ayurveda?

  • Health maintenance rather than disease treatment

  • System of diet and lifestyle

    • enhance the quality of life by dealing with subtle trends that might lead to actual disease

  • Compatible with those whose beliefs include naturalistic, spiritual and consciousness-oriented approaches

  • Often require intentional and sustained self-discipline, perseverance and active personal role.


Ashtanga ayurveda

Ashtanga Ayurveda

  • Kayachikitsa

    • Internal Medicine

  • Shalyatantra

    • Surgery

  • Shalakya Tantra

    • Otolaryngology(ENT), Ophthalmology

  • Kaumarabhiritya

    • Obstetrics, Gynecology and Pediatrics

  • Agadatantra

    • Toxicology

  • Bhutavidya

    • Psychiatry

  • Rasayana

    • Antiaging and rejuvenation

  • Vajikarana

    • Reproductive and aphrodisiac medicine


  • Theoretical foundations

    Theoretical Foundations

    • Darshanas – ideological systems

      • Astika

        • Sankhya – nontheistic creation sequence - by Kapila

        • Yoga – Gradual liberation of human spirit to attain Samadhi – by Patanjali

        • Nyaya Darshana – monotheistic system, logical approach of apprehending the world using reason

        • Vaisheshika - postulates that all objects in the physical universe are reducible to a finite number of atoms by Kanada

        • Purva Mimamsa (inquiry) – emphsis on discipline, ritual and service

        • Uttara Mimamsa or Advita Vedanta – spiritually oriented, emphasizes the spiritual base of reality, human misperception by Shankara (AD 780)

      • Nastika

        • Buddhism

        • Jainism

        • Lokayata


    Epistemology

    Epistemology

    • Knowledge Process

    • From Nyaya Dharshana philosophy

    • Four cognitive faculties

      • Manas – mind as it experiences sensations

      • Chitta – transmitter from manas to higher cognitive functions

      • Ahamkara – self-identity that provides the individual with the experience of relative constancy.

      • Buddhi – most refined, discerning ability, intellect, wisdom

    • Four techniques of knowing

      • Pratyaksha – direct sensory perception

      • Anumana – inference

      • Sabda – authoritative statement

      • Upmana - Analogy


    World view

    World View

    • Essentially unitary and dynamic, integrated coherence with actively interdependent aspects

    • Dynamic aspect is fueled by constant interaction amongst three doshas –

      • Vata : movement

      • Pitta : transformation

      • Kapha : consolidation

        • the fundamental regulatory principles of the body’s physiological functioning

    • Interplay between them modulates the interaction of the Gurvadi Gunas (10 pairs of opposite qualities)

      • Characterize all perceptible substances


    Gurvadi gunas

    Gurvadi Gunas

    • Shita/ushna

    • Snigdha/ruksha

    • Guru/laghu

    • Sthula/sukshma

    • Sandra/drava

    • Sthira/chala

    • Manda/tikshna

    • Mridu/kathina

    • Slaksha/khara

    • Picchila/sishada


    English please

    English please.

    • Shita/ushna- cold/hot

    • Snigdha/ruksha- wet,oily/dry

    • Guru/laghu- heavy/light

    • Sthula/sukshma- gross/subtle

    • Sandra/drava- dense/liquid

    • Sthira/chala- stable/mobile

    • Manda/tikshna- dull/sharp

    • Mridu/kathina- soft/hard

    • Slaksha/khara- smooth/rough

    • Picchila/sishada- sticky/clear


    Vedic standards

    Vedic Standards

    • Four basic life goals (purushartha)

      • Dharma – individual's abidance with the inherent lawfulness in universe – purpose, duty, justice

      • Artha – possessions

      • Kama – Pleasure

      • Moksha – liberation


    Sankhya model of creation

    Sankhya Model of Creation

    • Avayakta

      • pure existence in its unmanifest state

      • Absolutely transcendental, indescribable

      • Essence

        • Satyam – essential truth

        • Ritam – deep structure, self-correcting

        • Brihat – vast breath of its being

      • Two components

        • Purusha – primal immaterial matrix out of which all else emerge, pristine consciousness

        • Prakriti – when ‘purusha’ spontaneously moves, then at that moment the first material energy, prakriti, comes into being.


    Maha gunas

    Maha Gunas

    • Three axiomatic attributes that are inherent to maha gunas (subtle)

      • Sattva – pure, clear, harmony

      • Rajas – dynamic movement, agitation

      • Tamas – interita, dullness

        • Highly rarefied potentials that impart direction and create a unique character.


    Ahamkara

    Ahamkara

    • Next step in the developmental process of prakriti

    • A giant leap which eventually becomes most characteristically individualized in human experience

    • Experience of personal sense of self.

    • Next all steps are material


    Pancha mahabhuti

    Pancha Mahabhuti

    • Ether/Space

    • Air

    • Fire

    • Water

    • Earth


    Birth of doshas vata

    Birth of Doshas - Vata


    Pitta

    Pitta


    Kapha

    Kapha


  • Login