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Chapter 4. Product Design. Product Development Process Economic Analysis of Development Projects Designing for the Customer Design for Manufacturability Measuring Product Development Performance. OBJECTIVES . Typical Phases of Product Development. Planning Concept Development

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Chapter 4

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Chapter 4

Product Design


  • Product Development Process

  • Economic Analysis of Development Projects

  • Designing for the Customer

  • Design for Manufacturability

  • Measuring Product Development Performance

OBJECTIVES


Typical Phases of Product Development

  • Planning

  • Concept Development

  • System-Level design

  • Design Detail

  • Testing and Refinement

  • Production Ramp-up


Economic Analysis of Project Development Costs

  • Using measurable factors to help determine:

    • Operational design and development decisions

    • Go/no-go milestones

  • Building a Base-Case Financial Model

    • A financial model consisting of major cash flows

    • Sensitivity Analysis for “what if” questions


Value Analysis/

Value Engineering

Quality Function

Deployment

Designing for the Customer

House of Quality

Ideal Customer Product


Designing for the Customer: Quality Function Deployment

  • Interfunctional teams from marketing, design engineering, and manufacturing

  • Voice of the customer

  • House of Quality


8

Correlation:

Strong positive

X

Positive

X

X

Negative

X

X

X

Strong negative

*

Engineering Characteristics

Check force on level ground

Competitive evaluation

Energy needed

to close door

Energy needed

to open door

Accoust. Trans.

Window

Door seal

resistance

Water resistance

X = Us

Importance to Cust.

A = Comp. A

B = Comp. B

Customer

Requirements

(5 is best)

1 2 3 4 5

AB

X

Easy to close

7

X AB

Stays open on a hill

5

Easy to open

3

XAB

A X B

Doesn’t leak in rain

3

No road noise

2

X A

B

Importance weighting

Relationships:

10

6

6

9

2

3

Strong = 9

Reduce energy

level to 7.5 ft/lb

Medium = 3

Reduce energy

to 7.5 ft/lb.

Reduce force

to 9 lb.

Target values

Maintain

current level

Maintain

current level

Maintain

current level

Small = 1

5

BA

BA

B

B

BXA

X

Technical evaluation

(5 is best)

B

4

X

A

X

A

3

A

X

2

X

1

Designing for the Customer: The House of Quality

Customer requirements information forms the basis for this matrix, used to translate them into operating or engineering goals.

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 2004


Designing for the Customer: Value Analysis/Value Engineering

  • Achieve equivalent or better performance at a lower cost while maintaining all functional requirements defined by the customer

    • Does the item have any design features that are not necessary?

    • Can two or more parts be combined into one?

    • How can we cut down the weight?

    • Are there nonstandard parts that can be eliminated?


Design for Manufacturability

  • Traditional Approach

    • “We design it, you build it” or “Over the wall”

  • Concurrent Engineering

    • “Let’s work together simultaneously”


Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

  • Greatest improvements related to DFMA arise from simplification of the product by reducing the number of separate parts:

  • During the operation of the product, does the part move relative to all other parts already assembled?

  • Must the part be of a different material or be isolated from other parts already assembled?

  • Must the part be separate from all other parts to allow the disassembly of the product for adjustment or maintenance?


Measuring Product Development Performance

Measures

Performance

Dimension

  • Freq. Of new products introduced

  • Time to market introduction

  • Number stated and number completed

  • Actual versus plan

  • Percentage of sales from new products

Time-to-market

  • Engineering hours per project

  • Cost of materials and tooling per project

  • Actual versus plan

Productivity

  • Conformance-reliability in use

  • Design-performance and customer satisfaction

  • Yield-factory and field

Quality


End of Chapter 4


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