Cultural issues in the the evaluation of continuing judicial education courses
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Cultural Issues in the the Evaluation of Continuing Judicial Education Courses. Mary Frances Edwards Baghdad, Iraq. Evaluation. Livingston Armytage describes education evaluation as “making informed judgments on the overall value of a learning program and whether or not the

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Cultural Issues in the the Evaluation of Continuing Judicial Education Courses

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Cultural issues in the the evaluation of continuing judicial education courses

Cultural Issues in the the Evaluation of Continuing Judicial Education Courses

Mary Frances Edwards

Baghdad, Iraq


Evaluation

Evaluation

Livingston Armytage describes education

evaluation as “making informed

judgments on the overall value of a

learning program and whether or not the

program accomplished what it set out.”


How many people in the audience evaluate their cje courses

How many people in the audience evaluate their CJE courses?


Cultural issues in the the evaluation of continuing judicial education courses

  • Evaluation is one of the most culturally sensitive tasks in CJE

  • Acceptable methods vary from country to country


Kirkpatrick s four levels of evaluation

Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels of Evaluation

Reaction, Learning, Behavior, and Results


Level one reaction

Level One - Reaction

  • Oral comments

  • Written form at end of course

  • Immediate reaction to the educational experience

  • Usually includes questions about what other courses and topics the learner wants


Level two learning

Level Two - Learning

  • Test or post-course evaluation to determine knowledge retention at the end of the course or days or months afterwards

  • Measures what knowledge or skills they acquired and kept

  • Culturally sensitive because adults do not like to be tested

  • Assesses what more needs to be learned


Level three behavior

Level Three - Behavior

  • Assesses whether there have been any behavioral changes as a result of the education program

  • Done by observation or interviewing

  • Difficult to do because judges do not like to be watched

  • Valuable because assess what more needs to be learned


Level four results

Level Four - Results

  • Tries to identify whether the education generated change in the learners’ organization

  • Analyze written decisions, number of appeals, amount of tie needed to decide

  • Requires base to compare before and after


Feedback

Oral

Informal

Spontaneous

Not anonymous

Subjective

Written

Formal

Deliberate

Can be anonymous

Quantifiable

Feedback


Monitoring

Monitoring

  • Verifies or disputes Level 1 evaluations

  • Provides context


Cultural attitudes

Cultural Attitudes

  • Freedom of speech

  • Respect for elders

  • Protocal

  • Generosity

  • Bias

  • Fear


Why would an audience member refuse to criticize

Why would an audience member refuse to criticize?


Reasons not to criticize

Reasons Not to Criticize

  • It would hurt his (speaker or course chair or designer) feelings (particularly prevalent when organizers and speakers donate their time)

  • It would be disrespectful to criticize an elder.

  • I am not qualified to comment on an instructor’s presentation (particularly prevalent if the speaker is a judge or law professor).


Reasons not to criticize1

Reasons Not to Criticize

  • He will not be asked to teach again (extremely important in countries in which CJE presenters are paid).

  • It could go in his personnel file or it could go in my personnel file.

  • He will take revenge on me (us, the whole audience).


Reasons not to criticize2

Reasons Not to Criticize

  • The presenter or funder won’t do the program again, and other people need it.

  • My [employer, court] will find out it was not so good and not send me next time there is a course.

  • If I didn’t understand, it is my fault.

  • It is free (or I got a scholarship) and I am just happy to be here.


Why would an audience member refuse to praise

Why would an audience member refuse to praise?


Reasons not to praise

Reasons Not to Praise

  • I was forced to take this mandatory course, and I do not want to be here. Admitting it is good justifies their forcing me to be here.

  • She already knows she is good.

  • If the evaluations are too good, the speaker will raise her fees.


Reasons not to praise1

Reasons Not to Praise

  • If the program is too good, the presenting organization will raise the price next year.

  • I was too exhausted by the time it ended to write it down.

  • I was in a hurry to get home (back to my office, to the airport).

  • My [senior partner, spouse, head of our delegation] didn’t like the course, so even though I thought it was great, I can’t say so.


Reasons not to praise2

Reasons Not to Praise

  • I could have done just as good a job as she did.

  • If her ratings are bad, maybe they will invite me to give that presentation next year.

  • I have never liked him, no matter how good a speaker he is!


Improve response rate

Improve Response Rate

  • Schedule time to fill out form

  • Guarantee anonymity

  • Use the results


What elements does a good level 1 form have

What elements does a good Level 1 form have?


For a fee this high i think a luau should have been included

“For a fee this high, I think a luau should have been included!”

A traditional Hawaiian feast, with guest wearing flowers around their necks and hula dancing as entertainment.


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