Adolescent disengagement from school
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ADOLESCENT DISENGAGEMENT FROM SCHOOL. FOCUS Disengagement and low achievement o f Māori and Pasifika a dolescent m ales . Seminar Presentation to Principal, Senior Management and Heads of Learning. Sue Carnegie-Harding (Smith). Today’s Programme. 9.00 am – 10.00 am

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ADOLESCENT DISENGAGEMENT FROM SCHOOL

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Adolescent disengagement from school

ADOLESCENT DISENGAGEMENTFROM SCHOOL

FOCUS

Disengagement and low achievement

of Māori and Pasifika adolescent males

Seminar Presentation to Principal, Senior Management and Heads of Learning.

Sue Carnegie-Harding (Smith)


Today s programme

Today’s Programme

  • 9.00 am – 10.00 am

    • Welcome and Overview

    • Disengagement - What the research says

    • Key Factors in Disengagement and Low Achievement in Adolescents

    • Key Factors in Disengagement and Low Achievement in Maori and Pasifika Adolescent Males

    • Something else to consider

    • Activity (Cross-curricular Teams) – Discussion and ranking of issues and factors as you believe they apply to the school.

  • 10.00 am – 10.30 am Morning Tea

  • 10.30 am – 11.30 pm

    • What is our data telling us about Maori and Pasifika Engagement and Achievement? Issues and Implications.

    • Proposed new school initiatives to raise achievement and engagement

  • 11.30am – 12.00 pm

    • Activity (Cross-curricular Teams) – Discussion around application of proposed initiatives across the school to maximise intended outcomes. Group proposals to be recorded and reported to Principal for consideration.

  • 12.00am – 12.15 pm

    • Concluding address.


  • Disengagement

    DISENGAGEMENT

    Adolescence

    Important period of development and learning

    A time of greatest risk for disengagement

    Student motivation and engagement critical


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    • ENGAGEMENT

    • Psychological

    • Behavioural

    • DISENGAGEMENT

    • Psychological

    • Behavioural

    • Or an alternative definition that better fits the New Zealand educational system

    • Physical

    • Virtual

    • Unintended


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    Figure 1

    Figure 1. Displays the country mean for the sense of belonging and participation indices. (PISA Report 2000)


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    Table 1: “Pasifika achievement in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy as assessed by PISA 2000, is on average lower than for Pakeha, Asian or MĀORI students”. ( Focus on Pasifika Achievement in Reading Literacy – PISA 2000. September 2004. p. 20)


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    Table 2: “Gender difference in average reading literacy levels was found to favour girls within all ethnic groups”.

    ( Focus on Pasifika Achievement in Reading Literacy – PISA 2000. September 2004. p. 4)


    Key factors in disengagement and low achievement in adolescents

    KEY FACTORS IN DISENGAGEMENT AND LOW ACHIEVEMENT IN ADOLESCENTS

    • Socio-Economic Status (SES)

    • Pedagogy and Curriculum

    • Learning Needs

    • Teacher Relationships and Resilience

    • Learning and Physicality

    • Behaviour Management

    • Community Involvement

    • Transition


    Disengagement and low achievement in m ori and pasifika adolescents

    DISENGAGEMENT AND LOW ACHIEVEMENT IN MĀORI AND PASIFIKA ADOLESCENTS

    “Coherence in instructional and cultural responsiveness…may be more important than individual teachers’ specific practice.”

    (Amituani-Toloa, McNaughton, Lai and Arini 2009)


    Key factors in disengagement and low achievement in m ori and pasifika adolescents

    KEY FACTORS IN DISENGAGEMENT AND LOW ACHIEVEMENT IN MĀORI AND PASIFIKA ADOLESCENTS

    • Socio-Economic Status (SES)

    • Pedagogy and Curriculum

    • Learning Needs

    • Teacher Relationships and Resilience

    • Learning and Physicality

    • Behaviour Management

    • Community Involvement

    • Transition


    Something else to consider

    Something else to consider

    • A central issue in boy’s education is the on-going gap between boys and girls and in particular the low achievement of Māori and Pasifika boys.

      • Girls’ schools and co-ed schools.

      • Small schools and rural schools.

      • High decile schools.

        (ERO 2008)


    Morning tea 10 00 10 30 am

    MORNING TEA 10.00 – 10.30 am

    He inu māu? Haere mai ki te kai.


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    WHAT IS OUR DATA TELLING US ABOUT MAORI AND PASIFIKA ENGAGEMENT AND ACHIEVEMENT?ISSUES AND IMPLICATIONS

    “The school’s curriculum provides learners with educational opportunities that contribute to increasing learner engagement, progress and achievement.”

    (ERO Report 2010)


    Wgp college ncea level 1 2 and 3 data

    WGP College NCEA Level 1,2 and 3 Data


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    WHAT THE DATA SHOWS ABOUT DISENGAGEMENT AND LOW ACHIEVEMENT OF MĀORI AND PASIFIKA ADOLESCENT BOYS AT WHANGAPARAOA COLLEGE


    E asttle reports showing possible effect of transition on m ori learners in reading y7 8 9

    E-asTTle Reports showing possible effect of Transition on MĀORI Learners in Reading Y7,8, 9

    A

    B

    C

    D


    E asttle reports showing possible effect of transition on m ori learners in mathematics y7 8 9

    E-asTTle Reports showing possible effect of Transition on MĀORI Learners in Mathematics Y7,8, 9

    A

    B

    C


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    PROPOSED NEW SCHOOL INITIATIVES TO IMPROVE ENGAGEMENT AND ACHIEVEMENT OF PASIFIKA AND MĀORI ADOLESCENT BOYS

    “Maintain relentless focus on Maori student achievement.” (Goran 2009)

    “Pasifikas’ student’s academic success is a matter of national economic and social importance.”

    (ERO 2012)


    Information gathering

    Information Gathering

    It is not enough to just gather data.

    We must be rigorous in our analysis and review.

    The findings need to be shared – not only with Management and the Board, but with all teachers, with the learners, their families and the community.

    50% of schools fail to use findings effectively. (ERO 2012)


    Transition

    Transition

    • Ensure all learners make a successful transition.

    • In particular Maori and Pasifika adolescent learners

    • Take into account Maori and Pasifika learner’s cultural needs.

    • Support learners when they transition from Y6/7 and Year 8/9.

    • Have a transition programme in place for learners whenever they move to our school (Maori and Pasifika males in particular)


    Targeted intervention maori pasifika adolescent males

    Targeted Intervention – Maori & Pasifika Adolescent Males

    • Iwi/family liaison person

    • Maori/Pasifika male mentor programme

    • Maori/Pasifika leadership programme

    • Pastoral care for Maori/Pasifika males

    • Whānau rooms for use by Maori/Pasifika males and others - encourage social contact


    Targeted intervention

    Targeted Intervention

    • Culturally appropriate contexts in teaching (Maori and Pasifika).

    • Monitor and report Maori and Pasifika achievement by gender.

    • Gather student voice (Maori and Pasifika Males)

    • Set up focus groups of Maori, Pasifika and other males.


    Targeted intervention1

    Targeted Intervention

    • Acknowledge the ‘unspoken’.

    • Support Pasifika and Maori parents to understand NCEA . Stop unintended disengagement from occurring.

    • Investigate the use of the programme Me and My School to gather information regularly about learners levels of engagement.

    • For learners who are near completion of Level 3 by the end of Year 13, offer further study at Year 14.


    Adolescent disengagement from school

    Highly effective teachers are “inspirational examples of positive, caring, energetic, hard-working, loyal, enthusiastic people who are strongly committed to their schools, their careers and their students.”

    (Hill & Hawk 2000 p 81)

    High quality teaching is the most important influence that the education system can have on quality outcomes for diverse students.”(Ministry of Education 2009 p.20)


    References

    REFERENCES.docx

    REFERENCES

    • Alton-Lee, A. (2003). Quality Teaching for Diverse Students in Schooling: Best Evidence Synthesis. Ministry of Education. Wellington. Retrieved from http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/7705/BES-quality-teaching-diverse-students.pdf

    • Alton-Lee, A. (2008, 26 November). Te Kotahitanga:Using Research and Development (R & D) to make a much bigger difference for our children and our society. PowerPoint lecture presented at Te Kotahitanga Conference. Ministry of Education.

    • Amituanai-Toloa, M., McNaughton, S., Lai, M & Airini. (2010). Uaaoina le manogi o le lolo: Pasifika Schooling Improvement Research: Summary Report. Ministry of Education. Wellington. Retrieved from http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/pasifika_education/ua-aoina-le-manogi-o-le-lolo-pasifika-schooling-improvement-research-summary-report/feiloaiga

    • Balfanz, R., Mac Ivor, D., and Herzog, L. (2007). Preventing Student Disengagement and Keeping Students on the Graduation Path in Urban Middle-Grades Schools: Early Identification and Effective Interventions. Educational Psychologist, 424(4), 223 – 235

    • Barton, P. (2005.) One Third of a Nation: Rising Dropout Rates and Declining Opportunities. ETS Policy Information Centre. New Jersey: Princeton. Retrieved from http://www.ets.org/Media/Research/pdf/PICONETHIRD.pdf

    • Cox, S., & Kennedy, S. (2008) Students’ Achievement as they Transition from Primary to Secondary School. Research Division, Ministry of Education, Wellington.

    • Crosswell, L., Bahr, N., Pendergast, D., & Newhouse-Maiden, L. (2010). Developing Resilience. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed) (pp. 101 – 118) Australia: Allen & Unwen.

    • Darr, C. (2010). The Me and My School Survey. In Morton, J. (Ed.), Engaging Young People in Learning: Why does it matter and what can we do? New Zealand Council for Educational Research Press. Wellington.

    • De Jong, T. (2010. Managing behaviour. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed) (pp. 269 – 285) Australia: Allen & Unwen.

    • Education Review Office. (2008). Boys' Education: Good Practice in Secondary Schools. Education Review Office. Wellington. Retrieved from http://www.ero.govt.nz/National-Reports/Boys-Education-Good-Practice-in-Secondary-Schools-July-2008

    • Education Review Office (2010) Promoting Success for Māori Students: Schools’ Progress. Education Review Office. Wellington. Retrieved from http://www.ero.govt.nz/National-Reports/Promoting-Success-for-Maori-Students-Schools-Progress-June-2010

    • Education Review Office (2012) Improving Education Outcomes for Pacific Learners. Education Review Office. Wellington. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ero.govt.nz/National-Reports/Improving-Education-Outcomes-for-Pacific-Learners-May-2012

    • Else, A. (1999) Maori Participation & Performance in Education: A Literature Review and Research Programme. A Summary by Anne Else. Ministry of Education. Wellington.

    • Garrick, B., & Keogh, J. (2010). Differentiated learners. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed) (pp. 68 – 85) Australia: Allen & Unwen.

    • Goren, P. (2009) How Policy Travels: Making Sense of Ka Hikitia – Managing for Success: The Māori Education Strategy 2008-2012. Fulbright New Zealand. Wellington.


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    • Hill, J. & Hawk, K. (2000) Making a Difference in the Classroom: Effective Teaching Practice in Low Decile, Multicultural Schools. AIMHI report to the Ministry of Education. Institute for Professional Development and Educational Research, Massey University, Albany Campus.

    • Honan, E. (2010). Literacies. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed) (pp. 139 – 154) Australia: Allen & Unwen.

    • Hunter, L., & MacDonald, D. (2010). Physicality and learning. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed) (pp. 175 – 187) Australia: Allen & Unwen.

    • Keddie, A., & Churchill, R. (2010). Teacher-student relationships. In D. Pendergast & N. Bahr (Eds) Teaching middle years: Rethinking curriculum, pedagogy and assessment (2nd Ed) (pp. 254 – 268) Australia: Allen & Unwen.

    • Middleton, S. (2010). School looks good but is it engaging? Keynote Address 2010 [email protected] Conference. [Video File] Retrieved from http://edtalks.org/video/school-looks-good-it-engaging#.UVztC5NTC6U

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