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Workshop Scope. Technical tools. Soft tools Interaction Styles. Online Personality. Assessment. SIETAR 2004. Remote Cooperating and Learning. How to team, cooperate and learn effectively and efficiently online Henning Zorn www.zornconsultants.com Dr. Marcus Hildebrandt

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workshop scope

Workshop Scope

Technical tools

Soft tools

Interaction Styles

Online Personality

Assessment

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

sietar 2004
SIETAR 2004

Remote Cooperating and Learning.

How to team, cooperate and learn effectively

and efficiently online

Henning Zorn

www.zornconsultants.com

Dr. Marcus Hildebrandt

www.learning.de

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

it is time for a paradigm shift i

It is time for a paradigm shift (I)

Marcus: A German participant after attending our „Spinner workshop“ at the Learntec 2004 conference:

“I had the impression that the virtual run up of the workshop was more intensive than the actual f2f workshop itself.“

Henning: A Brazilian participant after having gone through an intensive 6 week‘s eCoaching session.

“For me the comments of the facilitator were extremely useful, it was like talking to him. (face to face).“

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it is time for a paradigm shift ii

It is time for a paradigm shift (II)

People from almost 50 countries participated in Henning‘s eCoaching sessions.

This is how respondents evaluated the sessions:

100% said issues where relevant to their work.

98% said that they could relate and integrate given advice to / into their daily work.

96% found the assignments useful

96% thought the coach contributed to their learning experience

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it is time for a paradigm shift iii

It is time for a paradigm shift (III)

Walther, J.B.: Computer mediated communication (CMC) is sometimes hyper-personal rather than the predicted impersonal (filtered cues theories):

Experienced CMC users rated text based media as rich or richer than telephone conversations and face to face conversations.

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slide7

What makes you a successful eModerator / eCoach?Assignment (II)

One of the major purposes to attend a SIETAR conference is networking.

Here is your chance: Select somebody in the room you would like to get to know.

Write her/him a message to establish contact (3-5 lines on a paper)!

You have 7 intensive minutes time…

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what drives this paradigm shift

What makes you a successful eModerator / eCoach?

What drives this paradigm shift?

  • The driving competences are:
  • Successfully creating social presence online or in other screen to screen (S2S) communication situations!
  • Use intercultural / transcultural approach for learning / coaching design!

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definition of social presence

Definition of social presence

The degree to which the partner of interaction is perceived as a person (Paechter, M. Schweizer, K. und Weidemann, B.)

In face to face communication situations social presence is mainly created through the richness of non-verbal or para-verbal information channels.

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examples i

Examples (I)

3 Categories for social presence (Online community of inquiry):

Affective responses (emoticons, humour self-disclosure)

Cohesive responses (phatics and salutations, vocatives, addressing the group as we, our or us)

Interactive responses (reply features, quoting directly from the conference transcript, referring explicitly to the content of others messages)

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example ii

Message

Article No. 432: [Branch from no. 430]

posted by Sally on Mon, Oct. 12, 1999, 12:06

Subject: re: Week 6 questions

Hi Guys:

Just got home from a very hectic day, but I want to respond to some of the postings before I fall asleep at the dinner table ;-) Joe asked: “Do you have experience with either one of the models (be it extensive or limited)?” Where I work, we tried the author-editor model but since 1988 we have moved to the course team approach. I have to agree with Gerry’s very perceptive comment about the cost, time and other demands of this approach. What really frustrates me is that our textbook fails to mention any of these types of things. Does anyone else feel the same?

Well, that’s all for now. Guess I’ll have a little dinner and see what’s on the tube.

Cheers Sally

Example (II)

Fictitious message taken from Rourke et al

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example ii indicators for social presence

Message

Article No. 432: [Branch from no. 430]

posted by Sally on Mon, Oct. 12, 1999, 12:06

Subject: re: Week 6 questions

Hi Guys:

Just got home from a very hectic day, but I want to respond to some of the postings before I fall asleep at the dinner table ;-)Joe asked: “Do you have experience with either one of the models (be it extensive or limited)?”Where I work, we tried the author-editor model but since 1988 we have moved to the course team approach.I have to agree with Gerry’s very perceptive comment about the cost, time and other demands of this approach. What really frustrates me is that our textbook fails to mention any of these types of things. Does anyone else feel the same?

Well, that’s all for now. Guess I’ll have a little dinner and see what’s on the tube.

Cheers Sally

Example (II): Indicators for social presence

Affective Response

Cohesive Response

Interactive Response

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

example iii

Ways to create para-language online:

Emoticons

ASCII-Art

Sound words: „mmhh, aha, yupp, uh-huh, smack“

Action words: „click here!“

Capital letters: If you do not stop I SCREAM!

Akronyms: rtfm! (read the fu… manual)

Avatars

Example (III)

d=(^o^)=b japanese: yeah

/=====================\ / : : : : : : | : : : :| : : : : : \ { : : : : : : : | : : : :| : : : : : :} \ : : : : : : : | : : : :| : : : : : / \======================/

Bandage

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culture s impact on emethods

Culture’s Impact on eMethods

  • Result / Objectives
  • Effective communication / learning should produce:
  • Reproducible knowledge
  • Concepts
  • Attitudes / paradigm shifts
  • Competences / Know how / Skills

Context

Where

With whom

Others’ expectations &

receptiveness

Presentation

Language

Media

Layout

Order / Flow

Characters

Colours

Expectations towards:

Process

Needs

Own and others’ Roles & Responsibilities

Communication and Learning Styles

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relevant relative cultural preferences based on g hofstede

Power Distance

High Low

Instruction Participation

Father Facilitator

Central De-central

Respect Initiative

Risk avoidance

High Low

Structure l. e. Open l. e.

Absolute rules Flexible rules

Coach: Answers Guidance

Deviation: Dangerous Interesting

Relevant Relative Cultural Preferences based on G. Hofstede

Individualism

High Low

Leisure time Increasing k + s

Freedom of learning Working environment

Challenge / sat Deploy of own talents

Mistake: shame Guilt

Moral obligation Functional relation

Masculinity

High Low

Achievement Relationship

Promotion Stability

Assertive Modest

Fixed roles Flexible roles

Confronting Compromising

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some general remarks on ecommunication

Some General Remarks on eCommunication

General Approach

Positive, confident and trustful

Integrity is crucial to make this work

Work from participants’ strengths

The coach / moderator needs distance involvement

Communication requirements

Communication efforts should be directed to adding value

Clear communication is crucial

Avoid reactive replies – always re-read before sending

International setting => English language

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culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede

High Individualism

Self-directed learning

On-demand availability

Peer2peer communication

High Achievement Focus

On-the-job-coaching

High Security

Structured learning path

Provide small early wins

Focused themes

Personalized approach

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

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culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede18

High Individualism

Self-directed learning

On-demand availability

Peer2peer communication

Multiple sourcing

Possibilities for creating own learning paths

Less structured assignments

Self-evaluative exercises

360 degree methods

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

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culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede19

High Power Distance

High profile project

Reward completion

Supervisor’s involvement

High Security

Structured learning path

Provide small early wins

Clear assignments

Significant Achievement focus

Experts’ visible involvement

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

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culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede20

High Achievement Focus

On-the-job-coaching

Groups assignments

Rotating leadership roles

High Security

Structured learning path

Provide content details

Group feedback

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede21

High Power Distance

Include supervisor

Reward completion

High Security

Structured learning path

Provide small early wins

Focused themes

Personalized approach

Significant Achievement Focus

On-the-job-coaching

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede22

High Individualism

Self-directed learning

On-demand availability

Peer2peer communication

Multiple sourcing

Possibilities for creating own

learning paths

Less structured assignments

Self-evaluative exercises

360 degree methods

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede23

High Individualism

Self-directed learning

On-demand availability

Peer2peer communication

High Achievement Focus

On-the-job-coaching

Create maximum visibility

High Security

Structured learning path

Provide small early wins

Focused themes

Personalized approach

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

culture s consequences for emethods based on g hofstede24

High Security

Structured learning path

Provide small early wins

Focused themes

Personalized approach

Fair Power Distance

On-the-job-coaching

Reward completion

Involve superior

Culture’s Consequences for eMethodsbased on G. Hofstede

eMethod supporters

Hildebrandt und Partner & zorn consultants

escalation box adapted from training management cooperation tmc

Encounter

  • Culture 1 / Culture 2

Escalation Boxadapted from: Training Management Cooperation (TMC)

6. Encounter continues without further friction

6. Encounter continues additional friction occurs

Clash

3. Communication Check

Examine orientation and attribution

Ask questions to determine source of friction

Person A annoyed

Really annoyed

2. Escalation Box

Person B more annoyed

Person B annoyed

Person A more annoyed

5. Modify behaviour

4. Increased understanding

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media appropriateness i

Media appropriateness (I)

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f2f, telephoning and email: assessed by Kuhlen

media appropriateness ii

Media appropriateness (II)

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f2f, telephoning and email: assessed by Kuhlen

media appropriateness iii

Media appropriateness (III)

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f2f, telephoning and email: assessed by Kuhlen

media appropriateness iv

Media appropriateness (IV)

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f2f, telephoning and email: assessed by Kuhlen

media appropriateness vi

Media appropriateness (VI)

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media appropriateness vii

Media appropriateness (VII)

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literature

Liam Rourke, Terry Anderson, D. Randy Garrison, Walter Archer, “Assessing Social Presence In Asynchronous Text- based Computer Conferencing” Journal of Distance Education(2001)

  • Rainer Kuhlen (Universität Konstanz)Fachtagung der Wirtschaftsprüfer (2002) Elektronische Foren und "Virtual communities" – zur kommunikativen Begründung des Wissensmanagement
  • Walther, J. B. (1994). Interpersonal effects in computer mediated interaction. Communication Research, 21(4), 460- 487.
  • Walther, J. B., & Parks, M. R. (2002).  Cues filtered out, cues filtered in:  Computer-mediated communication and relationships.  In M. L. Knapp & J. A. Daly (Eds.), Handbook of interpersonal communication (3rd ed., pp. 529-563).  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Literature

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