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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) Malaspina Great Books Death Mask Mozart Age 7 Leopold Mozart (1719-1787) Anna Maria Mozart (1720-1778) Anna Maria (1751-1829) Karl and Franz Karl Mozart age 74 (1856)

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

(1756-1791)

Malaspina Great Books


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Death Mask


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Mozart Age 7


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Leopold Mozart (1719-1787)


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Anna Maria Mozart (1720-1778)


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Anna Maria (1751-1829)


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Karl and Franz


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Karl Mozart age 74 (1856)


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Constanze Weber Mozart (1762-1842)


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Costanze Mozart by Lange 1782


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  • Classical Music

  • 1750 –1820

  • Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven

  • Loses “Continuo”

  • Emphasis on Phrasing & Dynamics

  • Internal emotional coloring

  • Symphonic style

  • Piano Forte


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  • Mozart’s Contribution

  • 528+ works

  • Masses, Vespers, Cantatas, Oratorios,

  • 21 Stage works (Don Giovanni, Magic Flute)

  • 47 Vocals

  • 40 Leider

  • 41 Symphonies

  • Several dozen Seranades

  • 21 Marches

  • 24 Dances

  • Concertos (20+)

  • Chamber Music

  • Piano quartets (11)

  • etc.


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First Symphony 1764


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25th Symphony – Age 18

Musikverein in Vienna


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Letter to Mozart from his Mother (Munich)

"Addio, ben mio. Keep well, my love. Into your mouth your arse you'll shove. I wish you good-night, my dear, but first shit in your bed and make it burst. It is long after one o'clock already. Now you can go on rhyming yourself. "


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Mozart Rhyme to Mother

Oh, mother mine!Butter is fine.Praise and thanks be to Him,We're alive and full of vim.Through the world we dash,Though we're rather short of cash.But we don't find this provokingAnd none of us are choking.Besides, to people I'm tiedWho carry their muck insideAnd let it out, if they are able,Both before and after table.At night of farts there is no lack,Which are let off, forsooth, with a powerful crack.The king of farts came yesterdayWhose farts smelt sweeter than the may.


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His voice, however, was no treatAnd he himself was in a heat.Well, now we've been over a week awayAnd we've been shitting every day.Wendling, no doubt, is in a rageThat I haven't composed a single page;But when I cross the Rhine once more,I'll surely dash home through the doorAnd, lest he call me mean and petty,I'll finish off his four quartetti.'The concerto for Paris I'Il keep,'tis more fitting.I'll scribble it there some day when I'm shitting.Indeed I swear 'twould be far better funWith the Webers around the world to runThan to go with those bores, you know whom I mean,When I think of their faces, I get the spleen.But I suppose it must be and off we shall toddle,Though Weber's arse I prefer to Ramm's noddle.A slice of Weber's arse is a thing


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I'd rather have than Monsieur Wendling.With our shitting God we cannot hurtAnd least of all if we bite the dirt.We are honest birds, all of a feather,We have summa summarum eight eyes together,Not counting those on which we sit.But now I really must rest a bitFrom rhyming. Yet this I must add,That on Monday I'Il have the honour, egad,To embrace you and kiss yours hands so fair.But first in my pants I'll shit, I swear.

Adieu Mamma


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Antonio Salieri (1750 – 1825)


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  • Salieri’s Music

  • His pupils included Beethoven and Schubert, Czerny, Hummel, Moscheles and one of Mozart's sons. He was a prolific composer, principally in vocal music of all kinds.

  • 45 Operas

  • As well as a significant quantity of ballet music, Salieri wrote concertos, including an organ concerto and a piano concerto, a Birthday Symphony and a set of variations on La folia di Spagna, (The Folly of Spain) the dance tune used by Corelli and many other Baroque composers.

  • Salieri wrote a quantity of church music, as well as oratorios. He left still more secular vocal music, ranging from cantatas and choruses to duets and solo arias.

  • As his style became old-fashioned his works lost favour, and he composed relatively little after 1804, but he remained a central and influential figure in Viennese musical Iife…Naxos Web Site


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  • Allegations by Mozart

  • Mozart accused of plagiarism and of attempting to murder him with poison.

  • As Mozart's music became more popular over the decades Salieri's music was forgotten.

  • Mozart blamed Salieri for the failure of his Figaro – yet, Salieri was in France with his own opera at the time.

  • the intrigues surrounding the failure of Figaro were instigated by the poet Giovanni Battista Casti against the Court Poet, Lorenzo da Ponte, who wrote the Figaro libretto.

  • When Salieri was appointed Kapellmeister in 1788, instead of bringing out an opera of his own, he revived Figaro

  • In late life there were rumors that Salieri confessed to Mozart's murder.


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  • Rumors that Salieri confessed to the murder - Salieri's two nurses attested that Salieri said no such thing.

  • After Salieri's death, the opera by Rimsky-Korsakov, Mozart et Salieri (1898) started a tradition of dramatic license based on this slander.

  • Salieri’s portrayal as a mediocre composer and blasphemer is part of that tradition. Salieri’s devotion is undisputed by his biographers.


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Mozart had numerous obsessions: clocks, cats, shoe sizes, his wife's safety - he had an unnatural fear of letting her out of the house. There is evidence of him twitching, grimacing, tapping his feet together and behaving oddly. As Peter Shaffer noted in Amadeus, he loved diversions and was always the life and soul of the party; he enjoyed rhymes, silliness and playing with words; he liked jokes and sometimes went too far, in the way that Tourettes sufferers often do…James McConnel (Tourette’s condition)


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