MARSEC CORP. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Marsec corp l.jpg
Download
1 / 46

MARSEC CORP. Maritime Safety & Security ISPS International Ship and Port Facility Security Code MTSA Maritime Transportation Security Act IMO Diplomatic Conference December 2002 Attended by 108 Contracting Governments

Related searches for MARSEC CORP.

I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.

Download Presentation

MARSEC CORP.

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Marsec corp l.jpg

MARSEC CORP.

Maritime Safety & Security


Slide3 l.jpg

ISPS

International Ship and Port Facility Security Code


Slide4 l.jpg

MTSA

Maritime Transportation Security Act


Imo diplomatic conference l.jpg

IMO Diplomatic Conference

  • December 2002

  • Attended by 108 Contracting Governments

  • Adopted amendments to the 1974 Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention.

  • Resulted in the new International Ship and Port Facility Code (ISPS).


Slide6 l.jpg

ISPS

  • Part A – contains security related requirements for Governments, port authorities and shipping companies.

  • Part B – guidelines on how to meet new requirements.


Purpose of isps l.jpg

Purpose of ISPS

Provides a standardized framework for evaluating risk.


Port facility security assessments l.jpg

Port Facility Security Assessments

1- Identify and evaluate important assets and infrastructure critical to the port facility as well as areas or structures that, if damaged, could cause significant loss of life or damage to the economy or environment.


Port facility security assessments9 l.jpg

Port Facility Security Assessments

2- Identify actual threats in order to prioritize security measures


Port facility security assessments10 l.jpg

Port Facility Security Assessments

3 – Assess vulnerability by identifying weaknesses in physical security, transportation infrastructure, structural integrity, protection systems, policies, communications, utilities, and other likely targets in the port.


Ship security requirements l.jpg

Ship security requirements

  • Security Plans

  • Security Officers (company & ship)

  • Certain onboard equipment

  • Monitoring and access control

  • Monitoring people and cargo

  • Ensure comms readily available


Port facility security requirements l.jpg

Port facility security requirements

  • Security plans

  • Facility security officers

  • Certain security equipment

  • Monitoring and access control

  • Monitoring people and cargo

  • Ensure comms readily available


Security levels l.jpg

Security Levels

  • Security Level 1 – normal

  • Security Level 2 – medium threat

  • Security Level 3 – high threat


Security levels14 l.jpg

Security Levels

  • Creates a link between the ship and port facility.

  • Triggers implementation of security measures for the ship and facility.


Increased threat level l.jpg

Increased threat level?

Counteraction = reduce vulnerability


Cso and sso l.jpg

CSO and SSO

  • Company – Company Security Officer

  • Ship – Ship Security Officer


Slide17 l.jpg

CSO

  • Ensure SSA conducted

  • SSP prepared and submitted for approval


Ship security plan l.jpg

Ship Security Plan

  • Operational and physical security measures to always operate in Level 1

  • Security measures increase with security measures

  • Response actions


Port facility l.jpg

Port Facility

  • Contracting Governments ensure completion of a Port Facility Security Assessment for facilities serving ships on international voyages.

  • Assessments determine which facilities are required to appoint FSOs and develop security plans


Security risk l.jpg

Security Risk

  • Threat of an attack coupled with the vulnerability of the target and the consequence of an attack.


Contracting governments l.jpg

Contracting Governments

  • Issues International Ship Security Certificates

  • Approves Facility plans


Amendments to solas l.jpg

Amendments to SOLAS

  • Automatic Identification System (AIS)

  • Ships’ id numbers marked on hull


Slide23 l.jpg

MTSA

Maritime Transportation Security Act


Area maritime security l.jpg

Area Maritime Security

  • 33 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 103

  • MTSA applies to all U.S. ports, including facilities and vessels (foreign and U.S.) operating within the port.


33 cfr 103 l.jpg

33 CFR 103

  • Establish the Captain Of The Port as the Federal Maritime Security Coordinator - responsible for increasing security within the ports.  •Establish Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committees. AMS Committees are responsible for:  •AMS Assessments  •AMS Plans  •Developing and conducting exercises


Implementation date l.jpg

Implementation Date

  • July 1, 2004 - Area Maritime Security (AMS) Committees established


33 cfr 104 l.jpg

33 CFR 104

Vessels


Applicability to solas vessels l.jpg

Applicability to SOLAS Vessels

  • Any Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit (MODU), cargo or passenger vessel subject to SOLAS - the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea Convention, 1974, as amended.


Applicability to passenger vessels l.jpg

Applicability to Passenger Vessels

  • On an international voyage, a vessel carrying more than 12 passengers, including at least one passenger-for-hireOn other than an international voyage:  •A vessel of at least 100 gross register tons carrying more than 12 passengers, including at least one passenger-for-hire (46 CFR Subchapter H);  •A vessel of less than 100 gross register tons carrying more than 150 passengers, including at least one passenger-for-hire (46 CFR Subchapter K).


33 cfr 10430 l.jpg

33 CFR 104

Passenger vessels


Applicability to cargo vessels l.jpg

Applicability to Cargo Vessels

  •Foreign cargo vessels, not subject to SOLAS, but over 100 gross tons  •U.S. cargo vessels over 100 gross register tons (46 CFR Subchapter I)  •U.S. Offshore Supply Vessels (46 CFR Subchapter L)


33 cfr 10432 l.jpg

33 CFR 104

  • Cargo Vessel


Applicability to barges l.jpg

Applicability to Barges

  •   •Tank barges carrying combustible or flammable liquid cargos in bulk.   These cargoes are identified in 46 CFR Subchapter D  •Tank barges carrying certain bulk dangerous cargoes as regulated by 46 CFR Subchapter O   •Cargo barges (subject to 46 CFR Subchapter I) carrying Certain Dangerous Cargoes in bulk - or that is engaged on an international voyage


Applicability to tankships l.jpg

Applicability to Tankships

  •   •Tankships carrying combustible or flammable liquid cargos in bulk.   These cargoes are identified in Subchapter D of 46 CFR  •Tankships carrying certain bulk dangerous cargoes as regulated by Subchapter O of 46 CFR


Applicability to tow vessels l.jpg

Applicability to Tow Vessels

  • Greater than 8 meters in registered length engaged in towing barge(s) covered under the MTSA regulations


Applicability to tow vessels36 l.jpg

Applicability to Tow Vessels

Requirements

  • Owner/Operator Responsibilities:  •Designate Company Security Officer (CSO) and Vessel Security Officer (VSO)  •Conduct Vessel Security Assessment (VSA)  •Develop and implement Vessel Security Plan (VSP)Master Responsibilities:  •Assures crew compliance with Vessel Security Plan  •Conduct required training and drills


Implementation dates l.jpg

Implementation Dates

  • December 31, 2003 – Unless subject to ISPS Code requirements, owner/operators submit Vessel Security Plans or Alternative Security Program letter to the USCG Marine Safety Center in Washington, D.C.July 1, 2004 – Owners/operators of U.S. vessels must have implemented the requirements of their approved Vessel Security Plan


33 cfr 105 l.jpg

33 CFR 105

  • Facilities Security Overview

  • The MTSA regulations found in 33 CFR 105 increase Coast Guard inspection and oversight responsibilities by expanding upon the definition of “facility”.   It also increases the Coast Guard’s jurisdictional boundaries.


Applicability l.jpg

Applicability

  • In addition to the historic definition of waterfront facilities, the new definition of facility has been expanded to include:·      Barge fleeting facilities that receive barges carrying combustible or flammable liquid cargos in bulk,   certain bulk dangerous cargoes, or    Certain Dangerous Cargoes;·      Facilities that receive vessels that carry more than 150 passengers;·      Facilities that receive vessels (U.S. and foreign) subject to SOLAS;·      Facilities that receive cargo vessels greater than 100 gross tons on international voyages, including the Great Lakes.Also, the Coast Guard’s jurisdictional boundary now encompasses the entire shore side complex of the facility.


Facility l.jpg

Facility

  • Any structure or facility of any kind located in, on, under, or adjacent to any waters subject to the jurisdiction of the U.S. and used, operated, or maintained by a public or private entity, including any contiguous or adjoining property under common ownership or operation


33 cfr 10541 l.jpg

33 CFR 105

Facilities


Requirements l.jpg

Requirements

  • Owner/Operator Responsibilities:  •Designate a Facility Security Officer (FSO)  •Coordinate the Facility Security Assessment (FSA)  •Develop and implement a Facility Security Plan (FSP)


Implementation dates43 l.jpg

Implementation Dates

  • December 31, 2003 –Owner/operators submit Facility Security PlansJuly 1, 2004 – Owners/operators of facilities must have implemented the requirements of their approved security plan


33 cfr 106 l.jpg

33 CFR 106

  • Overview

  • Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Facilities are generally offshore fixed platforms in water depths ranging up to 1,000 feet deep whose primary purpose is the exploration, development, and/or production of offshore petroleum reserves.   This definition also includes novel floating designs such as:  •Tension Leg Platforms (TLP)  •SPARS  •Floating Production Facilities (converted MODUs)  •Floating Production Storage Offloading units (FPSO)


33 cfr 10645 l.jpg

33 CFR 106

Outer Continental Shelf Facility


Marsec l.jpg

MARSEC

MARITIME SAFETY & SECURITY

www.marseccorp.com

630-759-3962


  • Login