Do all students need a college-prep curriculum

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Do all students need a college-prep curriculum?. There is a shared urgency across the nation to raise graduation requirements to better prepare students for college and careers.30 states have aligned or plan to align their graduation requirements to the college- and career-ready level. As other states and communities consider this move, a concern commonly arises:Is it fair to require all students to take a rigorous, college-prep curriculum when not every student is going to college?.

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Do all students need a college-prep curriculum

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3. The workplace has changed In the past, students bound for the workforce needed less-rigorous preparation than those bound for college. But research shows that the knowledge and skills high school graduates will need to be successful in college are the same as those they will need to be successful in a “good” job — one that: pays enough to support a family well above the poverty level, provides benefits, and offers clear pathways for career advancement through further education and training.

4. “There is no such thing as college-bound and not college-bound students. We cannot break them down like that anymore. It’s a culture change.” The workplace has changed

5. What level of education do workers need to get “good” jobs?

6. Today, a high school diploma is not the last educational stop required Jobs that require at least some postsecondary education will make up more than two-thirds of new jobs. Jobs that require at least some postsecondary education will make up more than two-thirds of new jobs between 2000 and 2010. These figures were produced using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey (2001) and Employment Projections, 2000–2010 and from the National Center for Education Statistics’ National Adult Literacy Survey (1992). Jobs that require at least some postsecondary education will make up more than two-thirds of new jobs between 2000 and 2010. These figures were produced using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey (2001) and Employment Projections, 2000–2010 and from the National Center for Education Statistics’ National Adult Literacy Survey (1992).

7. Jobs in today’s workforce require more education More and more jobs in today’s economy require some form of postsecondary education. Jobs that once required a high school diploma and paid $50,000 a year plus retirement benefits are disappearing, and new jobs require more knowledge and skills. What’s more, earning potential increases dramatically the more education young people receive. The typical bachelor’s degree recipient can expect to earn 73 percent more over a 40-year working life than a high school graduate; those with an associate degree will earn 25 percent more. More and more jobs in today’s economy require some form of postsecondary education. Jobs that once required a high school diploma and paid $50,000 a year plus retirement benefits are disappearing, and new jobs require more knowledge and skills. What’s more, earning potential increases dramatically the more education young people receive. The typical bachelor’s degree recipient can expect to earn 73 percent more over a 40-year working life than a high school graduate; those with an associate degree will earn 25 percent more.

8. Good jobs require higher levels of skills and knowledge “Good jobs — those with meaningful career paths and family-supporting incomes — will go to those with strong academic and technical skills, especially in math, science, and technology, and in the ability to reason, solve problems, and communicate effectively.” — Carol D’Amico, former Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education

10. What skills and knowledge do high school students need to succeed in college and the workplace?

11. Research shows that: “The academic intensity and quality of one’s high school curriculum (not test scores, and certainly not class rank or grade point average) counts most in preparation for bachelor’s degree completion.” Rigorous course-taking is the key

12. Taking advanced courses in high school prepares students better for college

13. Taking This holds true across race/ethnicity and gender

14. Students who are better prepared in high school are more likely to stay on track toward a college degree

16. More low-income students complete college when they take a rigorous high school curriculum

19. Core New Basics curriculum includes four years of English, three years of mathematics, and three years of science and social studies. Beyond New Basics I includes core New Basics and at least two of three science courses (Biology, Chemistry or Physics), Algebra I and Geometry, plus one year of foreign language. Beyond New Basics II includes core New Basics, advanced science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and advanced math (including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II), plus two years of foreign language. Rigorous includes core New Basics, advanced science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and four years of math (including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Precalculus), plus three years of foreign language and one honors/Advanced Placement (AP) course or AP test score. Core New Basics curriculum includes four years of English, three years of mathematics, and three years of science and social studies. Beyond New Basics I includes core New Basics and at least two of three science courses (Biology, Chemistry or Physics), Algebra I and Geometry, plus one year of foreign language. Beyond New Basics II includes core New Basics, advanced science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and advanced math (including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II), plus two years of foreign language. Rigorous includes core New Basics, advanced science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and four years of math (including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Precalculus), plus three years of foreign language and one honors/Advanced Placement (AP) course or AP test score.

20. In most states, students can earn a high school diploma without the skills necessary for college and careers.

21. 45 state set graduation course requirements

22. 32 states require students to complete Algebra I

23. 26 states require students to complete Geometry

24. 20 states require students to complete Algebra II

25. Algebra II is critical preparation for college and careers The number and difficulty of core classes taken in high school is strongly associated with how prepared high school graduates feel for the math-related challenges of college and the workplace. O College students who took Algebra II or higher-level math courses in high school are more than twice as likely to feel prepared for the math they are expected to do in college (60 percent feel well prepared) as students who did not take Algebra II (26 percent). O 68 percent of those who took Algebra II or higher feel prepared for the math they are expected to do at work, compared with 46 percent of those who did not take Algebra II.The number and difficulty of core classes taken in high school is strongly associated with how prepared high school graduates feel for the math-related challenges of college and the workplace. O College students who took Algebra II or higher-level math courses in high school are more than twice as likely to feel prepared for the math they are expected to do in college (60 percent feel well prepared) as students who did not take Algebra II (26 percent). O 68 percent of those who took Algebra II or higher feel prepared for the math they are expected to do at work, compared with 46 percent of those who did not take Algebra II.

26. How states are doing it: Default curricula (opt-out provision)

27. How states are doing it: Mandatory curriculum (no opt-out provision)

28. What do students have to say?

29. “Since I didn’t know a lot about college and what the requirements were, I was planning to take classes like woodshop, art and choir. I didn’t know I had to take all the English, math and science. … As I look back, I think, ‘What was I thinking?’ [In another district] I would not have done anything that I have done so far through my senior year.” — Ana Castro, student at Pioneer High School, San Jose, CA

30. Many high school graduates cite gaps in their preparation Achieve commissioned a poll of 1,500 public high school graduates (classes of 2002–04), 400 employers and 300 college instructors to learn how well prepared recent high school graduates are for college and the workplace. A substantial number of recent public high school graduates feel that gaps exist between their high school education and the skills, abilities and work habits that are expected of them today. The results were similar for graduates who went to college and those who went into the workforce.Achieve commissioned a poll of 1,500 public high school graduates (classes of 2002–04), 400 employers and 300 college instructors to learn how well prepared recent high school graduates are for college and the workplace. A substantial number of recent public high school graduates feel that gaps exist between their high school education and the skills, abilities and work habits that are expected of them today. The results were similar for graduates who went to college and those who went into the workforce.

31. College instructors confirm high school graduates’ lack of preparation College instructors estimate that 42 percent of high school graduates are not adequately prepared by their high school education for the expectations of college classes and are struggling or have to take remedial courses to catch up. Employers estimate that 45 percent of recent high school graduates are not adequately prepared to advance beyond entry level.College instructors estimate that 42 percent of high school graduates are not adequately prepared by their high school education for the expectations of college classes and are struggling or have to take remedial courses to catch up. Employers estimate that 45 percent of recent high school graduates are not adequately prepared to advance beyond entry level.

32. Graduates who faced high expectations in high school are twice as likely to feel prepared for future Students who faced high expectations in high school are much more likely to feel well prepared for the expectations of college (80 percent) than are college students who faced moderate (58 percent) or low expectations (37 percent). O Additionally, those students who faced high expectations in high school are nearly twice as likely to be getting mostly As in college (28 percent) as those who faced low expectations in high school (13 percent). O Students who faced high expectations are much less likely to take remedial classes in college (27 percent) than are those who faced low expectations in high school (50 percent). Similar proportions of graduates who faced high expectations in high school feel that they are well prepared for the expectations of the workforce (72 percent), whereas only 36 percent of those who faced low expectations say the same. O Among high school graduates in the workforce, those who faced low expectations in high school are 14 percentage points more likely to say that they are not on a path to get the kind of job they hope to have in five to 10 years than are students who faced high expectations (42 percent versus 28 percent).Students who faced high expectations in high school are much more likely to feel well prepared for the expectations of college (80 percent) than are college students who faced moderate (58 percent) or low expectations (37 percent). O Additionally, those students who faced high expectations in high school are nearly twice as likely to be getting mostly As in college (28 percent) as those who faced low expectations in high school (13 percent). O Students who faced high expectations are much less likely to take remedial classes in college (27 percent) than are those who faced low expectations in high school (50 percent). Similar proportions of graduates who faced high expectations in high school feel that they are well prepared for the expectations of the workforce (72 percent), whereas only 36 percent of those who faced low expectations say the same. O Among high school graduates in the workforce, those who faced low expectations in high school are 14 percentage points more likely to say that they are not on a path to get the kind of job they hope to have in five to 10 years than are students who faced high expectations (42 percent versus 28 percent).

33. If we don’t raise the bar in high school, students won’t succeed in college or the workplace. The bottom line

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