Towards sustainable universal access
Download
1 / 14

Towards Sustainable Universal Access - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 74 Views
  • Uploaded on

Towards Sustainable Universal Access. Siven Naidoo Meeting of the Technical Group and the Sherpas of the Secretary-General’s High-level Group On Sustainable Energy for All 18 th November 2011 OFID Headquarters Vienna, Austria. Overview. Personal Perspective Energy Efficiency 2008,

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Towards Sustainable Universal Access' - jade-brown


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Towards sustainable universal access

Towards Sustainable Universal Access

Siven Naidoo

Meeting of the Technical Group and the Sherpas of the Secretary-General’s High-level Group On Sustainable Energy for All

18th November 2011

OFID Headquarters

Vienna, Austria


Overview
Overview

  • Personal Perspective

  • Energy Efficiency 2008,

  • Urbanisation and shack-dwellings,

  • Poverty and Electropreneurship,

  • Energy Access and Climate Resilience

  • Energy Access and Adaptation and Mitigation

  • South Africa’s IRP 2010 – 2030

  • Water

  • Electrification

  • Conclusions

  • 2



    Energy access builds climate resilience
    Energy Access Builds Climate Resilience

    • Job creation – directly and indirectly

    • SMME development and economic growth

    • Air quality improvement – local and indoor – replacement of coal and wood

    • Improvement in Education and skills levels

    • Access to modern communications systems

    • Improved security

    • Safety – paraffin burns and poisoning

    • Health care through lighting, refrigeration, communications

    • The “external” benefits far exceed the costs

    4


    Access mitigation and adaptation the sustainability nexus
    Access, mitigation and adaptation – the sustainability nexus

    • The negative impacts of Climate Change will be experienced no matter how successful mitigation actions are

    • African nations are the most vulnerable to these impacts

    • The improvement of the resilience of energy systems is essential to Adaptation

    • The development of advanced infrastructure improves resilience

    • Energy access improves resilience

    • Adaptation and mitigation are two sides of the same coin – especially for Africa

    5


    Potential energy future 2030

    BURUNDI nexus

    KENYA

    DR CONGO

    TANZANIA

    SUPER GRID

    MALAWI

    GABON

    ZAMBIA

    MOZAMBIQUE

    ANGOLA

    ZIMBABWE

    NAMIBIA

    BOTSWANA

    SWAZILAND

    LESOTHO

    SOUTH AFRICA

    Potential Energy Future – 2030!

    GEO-THERMAL

    The Southern African Development Community (SADC) region offers significant avenues for growth and cleaner sources of power

    Significant demand growth and constrained capacity represent an investment opportunity

    CONGO

    HYDRO

    GAS

    GAS

    COAL

    WIND

    SOLAR

    WIND

    WIND

    NUCLEAR

    6




    Specific challenge water dry cooling kendal and matimba power stations each 6 x 665 mw
    Specific Challenge: Water nexusDry cooling - Kendal and Matimba Power Stations(each 6 x 665 MW)

    9


    Total water usage is decreasing until 2030 and water usage intensity is reduced by 60
    Total water usage is decreasing until 2030, and water-usage intensity is reduced by ~60%

    Water consumption in billion liters p.a.

    Base Case

    Revised Balanced Scenario

    Policy-Adjusted IRP

    Water-usage intensity of Policy-Adjusted IRP

    1,3 l/kWh

    0,94 l/kWh

    0,52 l/kWh

    -60%

    10


    Specific challenge access to energy electrification in south africa
    Specific Challenge: Access to Energy intensity is reduced by ~60%Electrification in South Africa

    • Added ~4.5 million households to the grid since 1994 – the majority using prepayment technology

    • Electrification has significantly increased from 1994 to today:

      • Nationally from 30% to 83% in Urban areas

      • Rural electrification from 12% to 57%

      • Limited success with stand alone solar home systems

      • Focus on schools and clinics

    • Funded initially through the electricity tariff, then from the fiscus

    • Protection for the poor through Free Basic Electricity

    • Still a significant backlog of 2.5m – 3m households without access to electricity – cost of $5 – 7bn

    11


    Conclusions
    Conclusions intensity is reduced by ~60%

    • Energy Access is a key enabler of sustainable economic growth and development (noting security of supply, efficient production and delivery and efficient end-use)

    • There are opportunities for Energy Access, adaptation and mitigation to complement one another

    • Major low carbon energy access opportunities exist in Africa

    • All of the above strongly justify the use of development, carbon and adaptation funds to finance key energy access infrastructure.

    • Public and private sector funds can be blended and leveraged to effect sustainable energy access globally

    • Specific Eskom and South African experiences, for example, the Accelerated Electrification Programme, the CFL rollout and the SWH Programme may have potential to be replicated (perhaps optimised) and implemented in partnership elsewhere.

    12


    Message from sherpa dr steve lennon
    Message from Sherpa – Dr Steve Lennon intensity is reduced by ~60%

    • I think we need to emphasise the need for a national electrification plan which identifies the status quo, quantifies the gap to universal access, then details how that gap will be closed. This must include major infrastructure (ie Tx and Dx) as well as all supply side options – not just renewables. Then it needs to include a roll out plan with indicative costs and sources of funding. For very poor countries a lot of the basic infrastructure – supply and delivery – will need very soft money – mainly grants.

    • The plan also needs to include institutional capacity required – what, where, who.

    • I suggest the team work on a typical template for such a plan with the objective being for that plan being sufficiently detailed for it to act as a funding prospectus to DFIs, banks and the private sector.

    13


    Thank you

    Thank you intensity is reduced by ~60%

    14


    ad