Making believers re establishing interest engaging non science majors in the sciences
Download
1 / 27

making believers re-establishing interest: engaging non-science majors in the sciences - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 172 Views
  • Uploaded on

Making Believers & Re-establishing Interest: Engaging Non-Science Majors in the Sciences. Laura Lowe Furge Ph.D. Department of Chemistry Kalamazoo College [email protected] . Liberal Arts Mission.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'making believers re-establishing interest: engaging non-science majors in the sciences' - jacob


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Making believers re establishing interest engaging non science majors in the sciences l.jpg

Making Believers & Re-establishing Interest: Engaging Non-Science Majors in the Sciences

Laura Lowe Furge Ph.D.

Department of Chemistry

Kalamazoo College

[email protected]


Liberal arts mission l.jpg
Liberal Arts Mission

  • “to prepare its graduates to better understand, live successfully within, and provide enlightened leadership to a richly diverse and increasingly complex world”


Non majors course offered l.jpg

Toxicology & Carcinogenesis

The Physical Earth

Chemistry of Antibiotics

Chemistry & Society

Astronomy

Energy & the Environment

Environmental Science

Biology: Stuff you Need to Know

Biology of Disease

The Darwinian Revolution

Non-Majors Course Offered


Science history survey l.jpg
Science History Survey

What are your feelings about science?

What are some of your most memorable science experiences (good or bad)?

What did you like best about previous courses in the natural sciences that you have taken?

What did you like least?

This course will hopefully have a lot of discussion and other class interaction. What works best for you in this type of setting? (examples: random calling on students, students raising hands to speak, small group break-outs for discussions, group presentations, etc…).

What would you most like to gain from taking this course?


Science history survey5 l.jpg
Science History Survey

Why do a Science History Survey?


Science history survey6 l.jpg
Science History Survey

Why do a Science History Survey?

  • creates a “safe” space

  • address issues of past “failure” and see that many of the students in the class have common anxieties


Science history survey7 l.jpg
Science History Survey

Why do a Science History Survey?

  • creates a “safe” space

  • address issues of past “failure” and see that many of the students in the class have common anxieties

    Could this have applications to “majors” courses as well?

    Cohen, Garcia, Apfel, Master, Science313, 1307 (2006).

    - social psychological intervention - changing people’s interpretations of the social world and their place in it and thus changing the objective environment


Science history survey results l.jpg
Science History Survey, Results

What are your feelings about science?

useful, scary, interesting has big confusing words like poetry, fascinating, misunderstood, important, difficult, challenging, interesting at surface level, useful to help cure disease, I’m hesitant in science courses, disagree with ideas of science being truth & absolute, confusing, never very interested, terrifies me, intimidating, fun to theorize about, dislike it, not my favorite subject

What are some of your most memorable science experiences (good or bad)?

being burned in a chemistry demo, learning to make beer, dissecting animals, labs/experiments, science fairs, counting species in mud, tie-dying T-shirts, bad 7th grade science teacher, learning anatomy & metabolism, teacher burning ceiling, messing up a long science expt and having to do it all over again, physics of Cedar Point


Science history survey results con t l.jpg
Science History Survey, Results con’t

What did you like best about previous courses in the natural sciences that you have taken?

hands-on experience/labs, good teachers, research topics in science, discussions about ideas, logic, relevance to my life, conservation aspects, field trips, how systems work together, practical applications, learning about environment, excited teacher, service learning

What did you like least?

being completely lost due to fast pace, lack of enthusiasm from instructor, Powerpoint lectures, lack of hands-on experience, math related things, lab reports, memorizing things, having no visuals for things on small scale, unavailable professors, technical details, reading textbooks, lectures, lack of connections to other ideas, lack of help, learning metrics, learning concepts that can’t be easily observed, terminology, details, taking tests, learning about things I can’t see, periodic table


What do students want l.jpg
What do students want?

  • Lab experiences - to “do” something

  • To learn something that relates to other aspects of their education


What are institutional goals l.jpg
What are Institutional Goals?

  • Increase science literacy

  • Introduce scientific method via hands-on experience

  • Offer meaningful experience related to broader education

  • Strengthen connections between science & society


What do our courses offer l.jpg
What do our courses offer?

  • Lab or field experience

  • Research papers

  • Presentations

  • Service Learning

  • Writing about science

  • Connecting to science in the lay press


Students practicing scientific method l.jpg
Students Practicing Scientific Method

Bishops Bog: Field Experience

& Service Learning

Ames Test:

Hypothesis Driven Experience


Alternatives to lecture l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • The “survey sheet”


Alternatives to lecture15 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • “Minute Pages” or “Half-Sheets”

Example questions:

General: What was the most important thing you took from class today?

Problem based: Would you predict p53 mutation hotspots to vary

with cancer type?

Reading based: Why are the terms “organic” and “synthetic” considered

“slippery” by the author of Living Downstream?

Scientific Method: How would you design an experiment to test the

mutagenic properties of your test compound?

Reference: Making the Most of College: Students Speak Their Minds by Richard Light


Alternatives to lecture16 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • Small group discussions

    • Get the words in their mouths

  • Example guiding questions:

  • Why does DNA damage cause cancer?

  • What is the role of P450 enzymes in toxciology & carcinogenesis?

  • If you performed the Ames test using strain TA1535, a known mutagen such as azide, and rich media containing histidine,what would you expect to see? Explain.

  • Discuss the following quote: “By listing hundreds of chemical agents, Proposition 65 decreases the effectiveness of the message of known health risks and diverts attention from non-chemical lifestyle risk factors (e.g. UV radation from sunlight, smoking, dietary factors) that are associated with human cancer.”


Alternatives to lecture17 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • Peer-paper review

    • Approval of topic (1-page thesis paragraph) (topics sorted by professor).

    • Complete draft with 10-15 primary references

    • Professor distributes drafts to group members.

    • Group members read, critique, prepare written statements with 3 specific strengths & weaknesses.

    • In-class discussions…

Adapted approach of Craig Nelson, Indiana University


Alternatives to lecture18 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • Peer-paper review - In class discussions

    • Author describes motivation for topic and what they hoped reader would gain from reading it (pre-prepared statement).

    • Each group member tells what they got from reading it (what questions did it generate, what questions did it answer, etc…).

    • Each group member lists & discusses the strengths they noted.

    • Each group member lists & discusses in turn the weaknesses they noted with suggestions for improvement.

    • Authors revise papers & turn in final copy to professor; all prepared statements turned in to professor at time of discussions & graded.


Cross disciplinary research papers l.jpg
Cross-disciplinary Research Papers

Major:

Art & Art History

Example Paper Topics:

  • Dying to Work: Occupational Health-Risks of Mexican-American Migrant

  • Hormesis and the Politics of Unintended Consequences

  • The Effects of Socioeconomic Division on Cancer in America

  • Breast Cancer Factors That Lead to a Disparity in Mortality Rate between White and Non-white Women

  • Cancer and Sexual Health: The HPV Vaccine Taboo

  • Public Health vs. Economics: The Debate Over Smoking Bans

  • Hormone therapy: How Pharmaceutical Giants Pathologized Menopause at the Expense of Women’s Health

  • Agent Orange Exposure in Vietnam Veterans: War and Cancer

  • Government Regulation of Smoking

  • American Cancer Hospitals: Economics of Desperation

  • Babies, pick your poison, DTT or Malaria

  • The Inefficiencies and Real Costs of California’s Risk Management Legislation

Political Science

Economics

English

Theatre Arts

Undeclared

Music

Chemistry

Theatre Arts

English

Political Science

Economics


Alternatives to lecture20 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • Service Learning

Chemistry of Antibiotics

- invites 6th grade classes of local elementary to come to K for a morning of exploring microbes

- students prepare interactive posters on topics from course

- students prepare demos and hands-on activities to do on topics from course


Alternatives to lecture21 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • In Class Presentations

Oral presentations with Powerpoint slides of research papers or other presentation topics.

Can be one student or student groups.


Alternatives to lecture22 l.jpg
Alternatives to Lecture

  • “Science Fair”

Environmental Studies and Chemistry & Society

Posters available in common area during a common time.

Requires topic research.

Requires peer-review.

Public display to engage community - visibility of sciences.


Science in the news l.jpg
Science in the News

  • Goal: increase awareness of how often science is in the news

    • How lay articles strive to make topic accessible

    • Reinforce vocabulary learned in class

    • Example: www.kzoo.edu/biology/courses/bio102/news.html


Other visible outcome l.jpg
Other Visible Outcome

  • Science column in “The Index”


Other outcomes l.jpg
Other outcomes

  • Staying connected - maintaining conversation


How does this enrich science experiences for science majors l.jpg
How does this Enrich Science Experiences for Science Majors?

  • Conversation!!

  • Understanding of demands of lab and lecture courses.

  • Mentoring.


Acknowledgments l.jpg
Acknowledgments

  • Non-Science majors of Kalamazoo College

  • Faculty teaching other non-majors courses for sharing their experiences

  • John Fink for helpful discussion


ad