Florida   Hurricanes  August

Florida Hurricanes August PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Florida Hurricanes August

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1. Florida – Hurricanes August/September 2004 Tropical Storm Bonnie and Hurricane Charley both hit Florida. Bonnie for the most part brought beneficial moisture as the state was trending dry. Hurricane Charley slammed into southwestern Florida on Friday, August 13, the eye crossing the shoreline near Port Charlotte, at about 5:00 PM EDT. By morning August 14, Charley had beaten a destructive swath diagonally across the state, exiting at Daytona Beach. Hurricane Frances made landfall at the Martin and St. Lucie County border at 1 AM on September 5, 2004 with sustained winds at 105 mph. Hurricane force wind made landfall from Ft. Lauderdale in the south to Titusville in the north. Hurricane-force winds of 75 mph reached as far west as Lakeland, in Polk County. Besides winds, the extended damage from Frances was from very heavy rainfall. After leaving the peninsula at Pasco County, Tropical Storm Frances then re-entered the Panhandle of Florida at Wakulla County and tracked north into Georgia and the Carolinas, bringing very heavy rain.Tropical Storm Bonnie and Hurricane Charley both hit Florida. Bonnie for the most part brought beneficial moisture as the state was trending dry. Hurricane Charley slammed into southwestern Florida on Friday, August 13, the eye crossing the shoreline near Port Charlotte, at about 5:00 PM EDT. By morning August 14, Charley had beaten a destructive swath diagonally across the state, exiting at Daytona Beach. Hurricane Frances made landfall at the Martin and St. Lucie County border at 1 AM on September 5, 2004 with sustained winds at 105 mph. Hurricane force wind made landfall from Ft. Lauderdale in the south to Titusville in the north. Hurricane-force winds of 75 mph reached as far west as Lakeland, in Polk County. Besides winds, the extended damage from Frances was from very heavy rainfall. After leaving the peninsula at Pasco County, Tropical Storm Frances then re-entered the Panhandle of Florida at Wakulla County and tracked north into Georgia and the Carolinas, bringing very heavy rain.

2. Track of Charley – WAOB map This map is provided by the World Agricultural Outlook Board, showing the path of Hurricane Charley. Note winds were at hurricane strength during its entire journey across Florida. This map is provided by the World Agricultural Outlook Board, showing the path of Hurricane Charley. Note winds were at hurricane strength during its entire journey across Florida.

3. Florida Crop Weather Summarized from report by USDA-NASS Released – August 17, 2004 Summary of NASS’ first, after Hurricane Charley crop condition and weather summary. While citrus trees where damaged, and green fruit was knocked off of trees, NASS could not get out for field evaluations and will include a more precise analysis in the next report. The heavy rains benefited pasture and hay crop conditions and also the next cycle of vegetable and fall-planted crops. Florida was trending dry before the storms.Summary of NASS’ first, after Hurricane Charley crop condition and weather summary. While citrus trees where damaged, and green fruit was knocked off of trees, NASS could not get out for field evaluations and will include a more precise analysis in the next report. The heavy rains benefited pasture and hay crop conditions and also the next cycle of vegetable and fall-planted crops. Florida was trending dry before the storms.

4. NASS Citrus Prod. Map – with Charley Track - PECAD Another map showing the areas of high winds. The red swath shows the area where hurricane-strength (> 75 mph) winds crossed the state. The orange lines indicate the boundary of gale force winds, 39 mph – 74 mph. The area shaded in red accounted for just under 52 percent of Florida’s 2002-03 citrus production. Another map showing the areas of high winds. The red swath shows the area where hurricane-strength (> 75 mph) winds crossed the state. The orange lines indicate the boundary of gale force winds, 39 mph – 74 mph. The area shaded in red accounted for just under 52 percent of Florida’s 2002-03 citrus production.

5. Florida – NOAA 15, July 6, 2004 A clear NOAA 15 view of Florida, dated July 6, 2004. A clear NOAA 15 view of Florida, dated July 6, 2004.

6. Florida – NOAA 15, August 17, 2004 This is the clearest NOAA 15 scene we have received since the storms. While cloudy, we can see increased in standing water from the July scene. The next slides give a better view.This is the clearest NOAA 15 scene we have received since the storms. While cloudy, we can see increased in standing water from the July scene. The next slides give a better view.

7. NOAA 15, Charley, pre-landfall August 13, 2004 The arrow points to the eye of Charley on the NOAA 15, Friday morning, August 13 scene.The arrow points to the eye of Charley on the NOAA 15, Friday morning, August 13 scene.

8. NOAA 15, Florida – Comparing July 6 to August 17, 2004 Several lakes and the Peace River are larger on the August post Charley scene compared to the July scene. The yellow arrows point this out. Several lakes and the Peace River are larger on the August post Charley scene compared to the July scene. The yellow arrows point this out.

9. NOAA 15 – Charley – Morning August 14. 2004 NOAA 15 scene: Charley was well on his way north by 7:00 am Saturday morning, about to make landfall again in South CarolinaNOAA 15 scene: Charley was well on his way north by 7:00 am Saturday morning, about to make landfall again in South Carolina

10. 24 Hour Precipitation (mm) 24 hr. Precipitation maps, provided by NOAA – CPC.24 hr. Precipitation maps, provided by NOAA – CPC.

11. Cumulative Rainfall Map Cumulative precipitation maps of rainfall for Florida, from Hurricane Charlie and Tropical Storm Bonnie. The two darkest areas in central Florida received from 6 to 8 inches of rain in about 24 hours. Cumulative precipitation maps of rainfall for Florida, from Hurricane Charlie and Tropical Storm Bonnie. The two darkest areas in central Florida received from 6 to 8 inches of rain in about 24 hours.

12. NE – Charlotte County, Florida Landsat 7 scene, two days after Charley. Some wet and flooded fields are easily visible and marked. Resolution not adequate to see tree damage or dropped fruit. The green “tractor marks” on the right hand side of the image show the data gaps from the satellite image, and are not part of our analysis.Landsat 7 scene, two days after Charley. Some wet and flooded fields are easily visible and marked. Resolution not adequate to see tree damage or dropped fruit. The green “tractor marks” on the right hand side of the image show the data gaps from the satellite image, and are not part of our analysis.

13. NE – Charlotte County, Florida Map of about the same area as the satellite image. More before and after images are on order from our satellite data vendors. We will provide you analysis as the data comes in.Map of about the same area as the satellite image. More before and after images are on order from our satellite data vendors. We will provide you analysis as the data comes in.

14. Landsat 5 – Before and After The August 25, 2004 image is much wetter. In DeSoto and Hardee counties, flooding of the Peace River and Horse Creek are evident on August 25, as examples. Much more standing water is evident in most counties in the August scene. The orange box on the right-hand image locates DeSoto and Hardee counties. The August 25, 2004 image is much wetter. In DeSoto and Hardee counties, flooding of the Peace River and Horse Creek are evident on August 25, as examples. Much more standing water is evident in most counties in the August scene. The orange box on the right-hand image locates DeSoto and Hardee counties.

15. Peace River – Hardee County, Florida There is much more water in the Peace River on August 25, compared to July 24, 2004, flooding is evident. This is in an area that was soaked by rain from Frances and subsequent storms in September. The bright orange areas are some field crops, including irrigated fields.There is much more water in the Peace River on August 25, compared to July 24, 2004, flooding is evident. This is in an area that was soaked by rain from Frances and subsequent storms in September. The bright orange areas are some field crops, including irrigated fields.

16. Peace River – De Soto County, Florida There is much more water in Horse Creek and the Peace River on August 25, compared to July 24, 2004, flooding is evident. This is in an area that was soaked by rain from Frances and subsequent storms in September. The bright orange areas are field crops.There is much more water in Horse Creek and the Peace River on August 25, compared to July 24, 2004, flooding is evident. This is in an area that was soaked by rain from Frances and subsequent storms in September. The bright orange areas are field crops.

17. A SPOT Scene – Southwest Florida This is an August 16, 2004 SPOT 4 multi-spectral scene. Heavy damage to buildings will be evident when you view the Quickbird images that follow. Even the better-than-30-meter resolution of SPOT 4 is not high enough to see the damage to buildings in this area. This is an August 16, 2004 SPOT 4 multi-spectral scene. Heavy damage to buildings will be evident when you view the Quickbird images that follow. Even the better-than-30-meter resolution of SPOT 4 is not high enough to see the damage to buildings in this area.

18. A SPOT Scene – Southwest Florida This is an August 16, 2004 SPOT 4 multi-spectral scene, full resolution sub-section. The blue area is approximately the area show in the first pair of Quickbird images.This is an August 16, 2004 SPOT 4 multi-spectral scene, full resolution sub-section. The blue area is approximately the area show in the first pair of Quickbird images.

19. Punta Gorda - Charlotte County Airport Map The orange highlighted area contains the area shown in the Quickbird high resolution true color satellite images. These next images illustrate how infrastructure damage can be assessed using high resolution imagery, much higher resolution than the multi-spectral Landsat TM or SPOT 4 sensors.The orange highlighted area contains the area shown in the Quickbird high resolution true color satellite images. These next images illustrate how infrastructure damage can be assessed using high resolution imagery, much higher resolution than the multi-spectral Landsat TM or SPOT 4 sensors.

20. QuickBird – March 23, 2004 Oceanside QuickBird scene – for a “before/after” comparison. QuickBird scene – for a “before/after” comparison.

21. QuickBird – August 14, 2004 Oceanside QuickBird scene – August 14, 2004 for comparison with March 23, 2004 scene. QuickBird scene – August 14, 2004 for comparison with March 23, 2004 scene.

22. QuickBird – March 23, 2004 Mobile Home Park QuickBird scene – for a Before/After comparison.QuickBird scene – for a Before/After comparison.

23. QuickBird – August 14, 2004 Mobile Home Park QuickBird scene – August 14, 2004 for comparison with March 23, 2004 scene. QuickBird scene – August 14, 2004 for comparison with March 23, 2004 scene.

24. Hurricane Frances A track map of Hurricane Frances, overlaid on a Florida county citrus production map. The light gray are minor citrus producing counties and the dark gray are major citrus producers. Hurricane force winds are highlighted by the black hashed area. Hurricane force winds hit all the eastern citrus counties, including the Indian River region, which missed most of Charley’s high winds. A track map of Hurricane Frances, overlaid on a Florida county citrus production map. The light gray are minor citrus producing counties and the dark gray are major citrus producers. Hurricane force winds are highlighted by the black hashed area. Hurricane force winds hit all the eastern citrus counties, including the Indian River region, which missed most of Charley’s high winds.

25. NOAA 17, Frances, post-landfall September 5, 2004 The arrow points to the eye of Charley on the NOAA 15, Friday morning, August 13 scene.The arrow points to the eye of Charley on the NOAA 15, Friday morning, August 13 scene.

26. Florida Crop Weather Released September 7, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service Florida NASS report – released September 7, 2004, Page 1 of 2Florida NASS report – released September 7, 2004, Page 1 of 2

27. Florida Crop Weather Released September 7, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service Page 2. Florida NASS report –released September 7, 2004, Page 2 of 2.Florida NASS report –released September 7, 2004, Page 2 of 2.

28. National Weather Service – Significant River Flood Outlook Besides wind damage, the significant damage from Frances and subsequent rain was multi-day overland and river flooding. Up to 30 percent of the citrus trees in the Indian River area were damaged or destroyed. While more than 90 percent were affected by multi-days of standing water. This lose of oxygen to root systems will cause death to some of the weaker trees, but undoubtedly cause the trees to drop remaining set fruit, that young green fruit that was not already knocked of by the Hurricane strength winds. Besides wind damage, the significant damage from Frances and subsequent rain was multi-day overland and river flooding. Up to 30 percent of the citrus trees in the Indian River area were damaged or destroyed. While more than 90 percent were affected by multi-days of standing water. This lose of oxygen to root systems will cause death to some of the weaker trees, but undoubtedly cause the trees to drop remaining set fruit, that young green fruit that was not already knocked of by the Hurricane strength winds.

29. Cumulative Rainfall Map Cumulative precipitation maps of rainfall for Florida, from Hurricane Frances and subsequent rainfall through September 15, 2004. Cumulative precipitation maps of rainfall for Florida, from Hurricane Frances and subsequent rainfall through September 15, 2004.

30. Florida Crop Weather Released September 13, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service Florida Crop Weather Report – after Hurricane Frances Released September 13, 2004 – Florida Agricultural Statistics Service Page 1 of 2Florida Crop Weather Report – after Hurricane Frances Released September 13, 2004 – Florida Agricultural Statistics Service Page 1 of 2

31. Florida Crop Weather Released September 13, 2004 – Florida Ag. Statistics Service Florida Crop Weather Report – after Hurricane Frances Released September 13, 2004 – Florida Agricultural Statistics Service Page 1 of 2Florida Crop Weather Report – after Hurricane Frances Released September 13, 2004 – Florida Agricultural Statistics Service Page 1 of 2

32. Florida Department of Citrus – September 9, 2004 Statement on Hurricane Frances Florida Department of Citrus – Sept. 9, 2004 Statement on Hurricane FrancesFlorida Department of Citrus – Sept. 9, 2004 Statement on Hurricane Frances

33. The End

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