Curriculum mapping
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Curriculum Mapping. What is curriculum mapping?. A procedure to present an overview of the learning experiences in the classroom Not what ‘ought’ to be happening, but what ‘is’ happening. What’s on the map?. Three types of data Content taught Processes and skills emphasized

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Curriculum Mapping

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Curriculum mapping

Curriculum Mapping


What is curriculum mapping

What is curriculum mapping?

  • A procedure to present an overview of the learning experiences in the classroom

    • Not what ‘ought’ to be happening, but what ‘is’ happening


What s on the map

What’s on the map?

  • Three types of data

    • Content taught

    • Processes and skills emphasized

    • Nature of assessment the student produces as evidence


Step by step

Step by step

  • Identify the primary skills to be learned

    • What content needs to accompany the skill teaching?

    • How do you match content to the established standards/competencies?

      • NASPE, NCATE, NATA


Step by step1

Step by Step

  • Using a computer, outline content and skills on a month by month calendar

  • Identify essential questions that examine what students should investigate and know in the short time with you

    • This is the heart of the curriculum rather than the periphery

    • Rather than state a behavioral objective, a question can be written to examine key concepts

      • “Why is one teaching style no better than another?”

      • “Why is physical education in the schools needed now more than ever?”

    • The essential questions are included in the content column


Essential questions

Essential Questions

  • Questions may drive your scope and sequence

    • Due to limited time, it is as important to decide what not to teach as what to teach

      • Choose the essential

  • Essential questions organize the curricular experience by setting the range and parameters of a course of study

    • A logical pattern should be organized on the calendar


Criteria for writing essential questions

Criteria for writing essential questions

  • Questions should be in broad, organizing terms

    • Like a heading in a table of contents; more umbrella-like

      • What are the major benefits of participation in health related fitness activities?

      • What are the symptoms that indicate an ACL tear?

  • Questions point to the essence of your conceptual priorities


Good questions

Good Questions

  • A question should engage learners in powerful experiences that may extend beyond one lesson

  • Be sure your sequence of questions are distinct, not repetitious

  • Questions should be realistic to the amount of time available

  • Questions should build on previous content


Skills identification

Skills identification

  • Consider the action/knowledge that accompanies the content and essential questions that were generated

    • What are the major benefits of participation in health related fitness activities?

      • What skills might be taught to emphasize the content question?

    • What are the symptoms of an ACL tear?

      • What should students know and be able to do?


Generating developmental assessment

Generating Developmental Assessment

  • Repetition in assessment is often noticed across K-12 instruction

    • Using standards and benchmarks, align authentic assessment that reflects movement on the taxonomies towards advanced work

  • The review of maps should indicate a spiraling nature of the learner’s experiences over time

    • Level of student learning should match the type of work expected


Assessment

Assessment

  • Mapping of assessments can alert the instructor to gaps in programmatic experiences

    • Read-throughs first by the instructor of record than by ‘external’ reviewers outside of the program are important

      • Other eyes need to reflect on the alignment of content, skills and assessment


The editorial process

The Editorial Process

  • A peer reads through once to gain information

    • Look for repetitions, gaps, meaningful assessments, match to standards

    • Highlight areas for future examination; avoid making suggestions

    • Peer works alone on first read through


Editorial process

Editorial Process

  • Mixed group review sessions

    • Typically a group who doesn’t work together for more objective analysis

  • Report of small group is reported to large group where findings are posted

    • Findings should be posted for further review

    • Decide whether next process is in large group or instructional groups


Editorial process1

Editorial Process

  • Faculty sift through data and look for points that may be changed immediately

    • Glaring repetitions

    • Gaps

    • Assessments that do not align

  • Determine points needing long term research and development

    • Major areas should be given to a site-based curriculum group to consider potential solutions\

  • Keep the review process on-going rather than every certain number of years


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