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Bird Song Learning in an Eavesdropping Context. - Phil Conroy, Lesley MacDonald, Val Schmidt, Kate Strangway. Background. Beecher His research: Social interaction in bird song learning (2005) The role of unshared song in singing interaction between neighboring song sparrows (2005)

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Bird Song Learning in an Eavesdropping Context

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Bird song learning in an eavesdropping context

Bird Song Learning in an Eavesdropping Context

-Phil Conroy, Lesley MacDonald, Val Schmidt, Kate Strangway


Background

Background

  • Beecher

    • His research:

      • Social interaction in bird song learning (2005)

      • The role of unshared song in singing interaction between neighboring song sparrows (2005)

  • Other papers for their research:

    • Peter Marler, 1970


Bird song learning in an eavesdropping context

  • Previous research has led to two main hypotheses:

    • Direct interaction

    • Social eavesdropping


Bird song learning in an eavesdropping context

Direct Interaction vs. Social eavesdropping…


Method

Method

  • 8 song sparrows (3-4 days post-hatch)

  • Tutoring began day 15

    • 4 hours/day for 15 days

    • All daylight hours after for another 30 days

  • 2 Phases

Figure 1 – Simple diagram of both Phase 1 & 2

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347207000516


Method cont d

Method Cont’d

  • Phase 1:

    • Separated into two rooms

    • Exposed to two adult tutors

    • Rotated between rooms every 4 days

    • Began singing ~day 60

    • 5 month hiatus of tutors

      • Kept in sound proof room


Method cont d1

Method Cont’d

  • Phase 2:

    • Tutoring resumed end of 5 months

    • Only used 2 of original 4 tutors

  • Half subjects had cloth between them and tutor for 1 day of 4 day cycle; day 2 in chamber but tutor was heard over loudspeaker

    • For other 2 days, heard nothing and as in original cage


Bird song learning in an eavesdropping context

Figure 2 - Procedure of Phase 2

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347207000516


Conclusions

Conclusions

  • Learn more from eavesdropping

    • Average 1.55-3.88 songs learned

    • Limited songs to learn


Major findings what can be done with this knowledge

Major Findings: What Can Be Done With This Knowledge?

  • Behavioral reasoning

  • Improving conservation efforts

  • Parallel to children


Any questions

Any Questions??


References

References

  • Beecher, M. D. & Burt, J. M. 2004. The role of social interaction in bird song learning. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 13, 224e228.

  • Beecher M. D., Burt J. M., O'Loghlen A. L., Templeton C. N., Campbell S. E. 2007 Bird song learning in an eavesdropping context. Animal Behaviour, 73,929–935.

  • Beecher, M. D. & Campbell, S. E. 2005. The role of unshared songs in singing interactions between neighbouring song sparrows. Animal Behaviour, 70, 1297e1304.

  • Marler, P. 1970a. Birdsong and speech development: could there be parallels? American Scientist, 58, 669e673.

  • http://theintrepidtourist.blogspot.ca/2011/05/africa-trip-40th-anniversary.html


Our questions for you

Our Questions For You

  • 1) If song learning in birds is a reasonable model for human learning what kind of implications might these results have on current methods of teaching in schools?

  • 2) The authors contemplate that males may eavesdrop to discover potential territory. What might be other reasons for developing the behaviour of eavesdropping?

  • 3) In what ways would it be beneficial for song sparrows to learn through eavesdropping compared to learning straight from a tutor?

  • 4) Were the results of the study what you expected? What are some possible negative’s to learning through eavesdropping?

  • Discussion Time!!

    • Separate into four groups


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