Erik satie s gymnop die and the acoustics of piano chords
Sponsored Links
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
1 / 10

Erik Satie’s Gymnopèdie and the Acoustics of Piano Chords PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 69 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Erik Satie’s Gymnopèdie and the Acoustics of Piano Chords. Some Background on Gymnopèdie. Series of three piano compositions written by Satie, written the French composer in 1888. Considered to be the forerunner of ambient music, and perhaps erroneously, furniture music. Question:.

Download Presentation

Erik Satie’s Gymnopèdie and the Acoustics of Piano Chords

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Erik Satie’s Gymnopèdie and the Acoustics of Piano Chords


Some Background on Gymnopèdie

  • Series of three piano compositions written by Satie, written the French composer in 1888.

  • Considered to be the forerunner of ambient music, and perhaps erroneously, furniture music.


Question:

  • While this piece certainly sounds very nice, is there any objective reason why?


Opening Chords

The piece begins with a pair of alternating major seventh chords. The first and third chords are based of a root of G (in this case G2). Meanwhile, the second fourth chords have D (specifically, D2) as a root.


Frequencies that should be present (below 1000 Hz):

Root on G

Root on D


Root G Root D


The Actual Numbers:

Root G

Root D


Root G Root D


Results from my playing:

Root of G

Root of D


Why Don’t Harmonics Line-Up?:

  • TheAnswer lies in the instrument itself: Inharmonicity results from the piano creating stretched partials.

  • However, as Harvey Fletcher proposed, these partials are also responsible for giving the piano its distinctive sound.


  • Login