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Business Fundamentals: Accounting P rof. Salem Helles. Work of Management. Planning. Directing and Motivating. Controlling. Select alternative that does the best job of furthering organization’s objectives. Develop budgets to guide progress toward the selected alternative. Planning.

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work of management
Work of Management

Planning

Directing and Motivating

Controlling

planning

Select alternative that does the best job of furtheringorganization’s objectives.

Develop budgets to guideprogress toward theselected alternative.

Planning

Identifyalternatives.

slide4

Directing and Motivating

Directing and motivating involves managing day-to-day activities to keep the organization running smoothly.

  • Employee work assignments.
  • Routine problem solving.
  • Conflict resolution.
  • Effective communications.
controlling
Controlling

The control function ensuresthat plans are being followed.

Feedback in the form of performance reportsthat compare actual results with the budgetare an essential part of the control function.

planning and control cycle

Exh.

1-1

Planning and Control Cycle

Formulating long-and short-term plans (Planning)

Begin

Comparing actualto planned performance (Controlling)

Implementing plans (Directing and Motivating)

DecisionMaking

Measuringperformance (Controlling)

comparing merchandising and manufacturing activities
Merchandisers . . .

Buy finished goods.

Sell finished goods.

Manufacturers . . .

Buy raw materials.

Produce and sell finished goods.

MegaLoMart

Comparing Merchandising and Manufacturing Activities
balance sheet
Balance Sheet

Merchandiser

Current assets

  • Cash
  • Receivables
  • Prepaid Expenses
  • Merchandise Inventory
  • Manufacturer
  • Current Assets
    • Cash
    • Receivables
    • Prepaid Expenses
    • Inventories
      • Raw Materials
      • Work in Process
      • Finished Goods
balance sheet1

Materials waiting to be processed.

Partially complete products – some material, labor, or overhead has been added.

Completed products awaiting sale.

Balance Sheet

Merchandiser

Current assets

  • Cash
  • Receivables
  • Prepaid Expenses
  • Merchandise Inventory
  • Manufacturer
  • Current Assets
    • Cash
    • Receivables
    • Prepaid Expenses
    • Inventories
      • Raw Materials
      • Work in Process
      • Finished Goods
the income statement
The Income Statement

Cost of goods sold for manufacturers differs only slightly from cost of goods sold for merchandisers.

inventory flows

Beginning

balance$$

Additions$$$

Available$$$$$

=

+

Available$$$$$

_

Withdrawals$$$

Ending

balance

$$

=

Inventory Flows
quick check
Quick Check 

If your inventory balance at the beginning of the month was $1,000, you bought $100 during the month, and sold $300 during the month, what would be the balance at the end of the month?

A. $1,000.

B. $ 800.

C. $1,200.

D. $ 200.

quick check1
Quick Check 

If your inventory balance at the beginning of the month was $1,000, you bought $100 during the month, and sold $300 during the month, what would be the balance at the end of the month?

A. $1,000.

B. $ 800.

C. $1,200.

D. $ 200.

$1,000 + $100 = $1,100

$1,100 - $300 = $800

schedule of cost of goods manufactured
Schedule of Cost of Goods Manufactured

Calculates the cost of raw material, direct labor and manufacturing overhead used in production.

Calculates the manufacturing costs associated with goods that were finished during the period.

product cost flows
Product Cost Flows

As items are removed from raw materials inventory and placed into the production process, they arecalled direct materials.

product cost flows2
Product Cost Flows

All manufacturing costs incurred during the period are added to the beginning balance of work in process.

product cost flows3
Product Cost Flows

Costs associated with the goods that are completed during the period are transferred to finished goods inventory.

manufacturing cost flows

Material Purchases

Raw Materials

Direct Labor

Work in Process

ManufacturingOverhead

Cost of GoodsSold

FinishedGoods

Period Costs

Selling andAdministrative

Selling andAdministrative

Manufacturing Cost Flows

Income StatementExpenses

Balance Sheet Costs Inventories

quick check2
Beginning raw materials inventory was $32,000. During the month, $276,000 of raw material was purchased. A count at the end of the month revealed that $28,000 of raw material was still present. What is the cost of direct material used?

A. $276,000

B. $272,000

C. $280,000

D. $ 2,000

Quick Check 
quick check3
Beginning raw materials inventory was $32,000. During the month, $276,000 of raw material was purchased. A count at the end of the month revealed that $28,000 of raw material was still present. What is the cost of direct material used?

A. $276,000

B. $272,000

C. $280,000

D. $ 2,000

Quick Check 
quick check4
Quick Check 

Direct materials used in production totaled $280,000. Direct labor was $375,000 and factory overhead was $180,000. What were total manufacturing costs incurred for the month?

A. $555,000

B. $835,000

C. $655,000

D. Cannot be determined.

quick check5
Quick Check 

Direct materials used in production totaled $280,000. Direct labor was $375,000 and factory overhead was $180,000. What were total manufacturing costs incurred for the month?

A. $555,000

B. $835,000

C. $655,000

D. Cannot be determined.

quick check6
Quick Check 

Beginning work in process was $125,000. Manufacturing costs incurred for the month were $835,000. There were $200,000 of partially finished goods remaining in work in process inventory at the end of the month. What was the cost of goods manufactured during the month?

A. $1,160,000

B. $ 910,000

C. $ 760,000

D. Cannot be determined.

quick check7
Quick Check 

Beginning work in process was $125,000. Manufacturing costs incurred for the month were $835,000. There were $200,000 of partially finished goods remaining in work in process inventory at the end of the month. What was the cost of goods manufactured during the month?

A. $1,160,000

B. $ 910,000

C. $ 760,000

D. Cannot be determined.

quick check8
Quick Check 

Beginning finished goods inventory was $130,000. The cost of goods manufactured for the month was $760,000. And the ending finished goods inventory was $150,000. What was the cost of goods sold for the month?

A. $ 20,000.

B. $740,000.

C. $780,000.

D. $760,000.

quick check9
Quick Check 

Beginning finished goods inventory was $130,000. The cost of goods manufactured for the month was $760,000. And the ending finished goods inventory was $150,000. What was the cost of goods sold for the month?

A. $ 20,000.

B. $740,000.

C. $780,000.

D. $760,000.

$130,000 + $760,000 = $890,000

$890,000 - $150,000 = $740,000

cost classifications for decision making
Cost Classifications for Decision Making
  • Every decision involves a choice between at least two alternatives.
  • Only those costs and benefits that differ between alternatives are relevant in a decision. All other costs and benefits can and should be ignored.
differential costs and revenues
Differential Costs and Revenues

Costs and revenues that differ among alternatives.

Example: You have a job paying $1,500 per month in your hometown. You have a job offer in a neighboring city that pays $2,000 per month. The commuting cost to the city is $300 per month.

Differential revenue is:

$2,000 – $1,500 = $500

Differential cost is:

$300

opportunity costs
Opportunity Costs

The potential benefit that is given up when one alternative is selected over another.

Example: If you werenot attending college,you could be earning$15,000 per year. Your opportunity costof attending college for one year is $15,000.

sunk costs
Sunk Costs

Sunk costs have already been incurred and cannot be changed now or in the future. They should be ignored when making decisions.

Example:You bought an automobile that cost $10,000 two years ago. The $10,000 cost is sunk because whether you drive it, park it, trade it, or sell it, you cannot change the $10,000 cost.

quick check10
Quick Check 

Suppose you are trying to decide whether to drive or take the train to Portland to attend a concert. You have ample cash to do either, but you don’t want to waste money needlessly. Is the cost of the train ticket relevant in this decision? In other words, should the cost of the train ticket affect the decision of whether you drive or take the train to Portland?

A. Yes, the cost of the train ticket is relevant.

B. No, the cost of the train ticket is not relevant.

quick check11
Quick Check 

Suppose you are trying to decide whether to drive or take the train to Portland to attend a concert. You have ample cash to do either, but you don’t want to waste money needlessly. Is the cost of the train ticket relevant in this decision? In other words, should the cost of the train ticket affect the decision of whether you drive or take the train to Portland?

A. Yes, the cost of the train ticket is relevant.

B. No, the cost of the train ticket is not relevant.

quick check12
Quick Check 

Suppose you are trying to decide whether to drive or take the train to Portland to attend a concert. You have ample cash to do either, but you don’t want to waste money needlessly. Is the annual cost of licensing your car relevant in this decision?

A. Yes, the licensing cost is relevant.

B. No, the licensing cost is not relevant.

quick check13
Quick Check 

Suppose you are trying to decide whether to drive or take the train to Portland to attend a concert. You have ample cash to do either, but you don’t want to waste money needlessly. Is the annual cost of licensing your car relevant in this decision?

A. Yes, the licensing cost is relevant.

B. No, the licensing cost is not relevant.

quick check14
Quick Check 

Suppose that your car could be sold now for $5,000. Is this a sunk cost?

A. Yes, it is a sunk cost.

B. No, it is not a sunk cost.

quick check15
Quick Check 

Suppose that your car could be sold now for $5,000. Is this a sunk cost?

A. Yes, it is a sunk cost.

B. No, it is not a sunk cost.

the contribution format

The contribution margin format emphasizes cost behavior. Contribution margin covers fixed costs and provides for income.

The Contribution Format
basics of cost volume profit analysis
Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis

Contribution Margin (CM) is the amount remaining from sales revenue after variable expenses have been deducted.

basics of cost volume profit analysis1
Basics of Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis

CM is used first to cover fixed expenses. Any remaining CM contributes to net operating income.

the contribution approach
The Contribution Approach

Sales, variable expenses, and contribution margin can also be expressed on a per unit basis. If Racing sells an additional bicycle, $200 additional CM will be generated to cover fixed expenses and profit.

the contribution approach1
The Contribution Approach

Each month Racing must generate at least $80,000 in total CM to break even.

the contribution approach2
The Contribution Approach

If Racing sells 400 unitsin a month, it will be operating at the break-even point.

the contribution approach3
The Contribution Approach

If Racing sells one more bike (401 bikes), net

operating income will increase by $200.

the contribution approach4
The Contribution Approach

We do not need to prepare an income statement to estimate profits at a particular sales volume. Simply multiply the number of units sold above break-even by the contribution margin per unit.

If Racing sells 430 bikes, its net income will be $6,000.

cvp relationships in graphic form
CVP Relationships in Graphic Form

The relationship among revenue, cost, profit and volume can be expressed graphically by preparing a CVP graph. Racing developed contribution margin income statements at 300, 400, and 500 units sold. We will use this information to prepare the CVP graph.

cvp graph
CVP Graph

Dollars

In a CVP graph, unit volume is usually represented on the horizontal (X) axis and dollars on the vertical (Y) axis.

Units

cvp graph2

Total Expenses

Fixed Expenses

CVP Graph

Dollars

Units

cvp graph3

Total Sales

Total Expenses

Fixed Expenses

CVP Graph

Dollars

Units

contribution margin ratio

Total CM

Total sales

CM Ratio =

$80,000

$200,000

= 40%

Contribution Margin Ratio

The contribution margin ratio is:For Racing Bicycle Company the ratio is:

Each $1.00 increase in sales results in a total contribution margin increase of 40¢.

contribution margin ratio1

Unit CM

Unit selling price

CM Ratio =

$200

$500

= 40%

Contribution Margin Ratio

Or, in terms of units, the contribution margin ratiois:For Racing Bicycle Company the ratio is:

quick check16
Quick Check 

Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the CM Ratio for Coffee Klatch?

a. 1.319

b. 0.758

c. 0.242

d. 4.139

quick check17

Unit contribution margin

Unit selling price

CM Ratio =

($1.49-$0.36)

$1.49

=

$1.13

$1.49

=

= 0.758

Quick Check 

Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the CM Ratio for Coffee Klatch?

a. 1.319

b. 0.758

c. 0.242

d. 4.139

changes in fixed costs and sales volume
Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume

What is the profit impact if Racing can increase unit sales from 500 to 540 by increasing the monthly advertising budget by $10,000?

changes in fixed costs and sales volume1

$80,000 + $10,000 advertising = $90,000

Changes in Fixed Costs and Sales Volume

Sales increased by $20,000, but net operating income decreased by $2,000.

change in variable costs and sales volume
Change in Variable Costs and Sales Volume

What is the profit impact if Racing can use higher quality raw materials, thus increasing variable costs per unit by $10, to generate an increase in unit sales from 500 to 580?

change in variable costs and sales volume1

580 units × $310 variable cost/unit = $179,800

Change in Variable Costs and Sales Volume

Sales increase by $40,000, and net operating income increases by $10,200.

change in fixed cost sales price and volume
Change in Fixed Cost, Sales Price and Volume

What is the profit impact if Racing (1) cuts its selling price $20 per unit, (2) increases its advertising budget by $15,000 per month, and (3) increases unit sales from 500 to 650 units per month?

change in fixed cost sales price and volume1
Change in Fixed Cost, Sales Price and Volume

Sales increase by $62,000, fixed costs increase by $15,000, and net operating income increases by $2,000.

change in variable cost fixed cost and sales volume
Change in Variable Cost, Fixed Cost and Sales Volume

What is the profit impact if Racing (1) pays a $15 sales commission per bike sold instead of paying salespersons flat salaries that currently total $6,000 per month, and (2) increases unit sales from 500 to 575 bikes?

change in variable cost fixed cost and sales volume1
Change in Variable Cost, Fixed Cost and Sales Volume

Sales increase by $37,500, variable costs increase by $31,125, but fixed expenses decrease by $6,000.

change in regular sales price
Change in Regular Sales Price

If Racing has an opportunity to sell 150 bikes to a wholesaler without disturbing sales to other customers or fixed expenses, what price would it quote to the wholesaler if it wants to increase monthly profits by $3,000?

break even analysis
Break-Even Analysis

Break-even analysis can be approached in two ways:

  • Equation method
  • Contribution margin method
equation method

At the break-even point

profits equal zero

Equation Method

Profits = (Sales – Variable expenses) – Fixed expenses

OR

Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits

break even analysis1
Break-Even Analysis

Here is the information from Racing Bicycle Company:

equation method1
Equation Method
  • We calculate the break-even point as follows:

Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits

$500Q = $300Q + $80,000 +$0

Where:

Q = Number of bikes sold

$500 = Unit selling price

$300 = Unit variable expense

$80,000 = Total fixed expense

equation method2
Equation Method
  • We calculate the break-even point as follows:

Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits

$500Q = $300Q + $80,000 + $0

$200Q = $80,000

Q = $80,000 ÷ $200 per bike

Q = 400 bikes

equation method3
Equation Method
  • The equation can be modified to calculate the break-even point in sales dollars.

Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits

X = 0.60X + $80,000 +$0

Where:

X = Total sales dollars

0.60 = Variable expenses as a % of sales $80,000 = Total fixed expenses

equation method4
Equation Method
  • The equation can be modified to calculate the break-even point in sales dollars.

Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits

X = 0.60X + $80,000 + $0

0.40X = $80,000

X = $80,000 ÷ 0.40

X = $200,000

contribution margin method

Break-even point

in units sold

Fixed expenses

Unit contribution margin

=

Break-even point in

total sales dollars

Fixed expenses

CM ratio

=

Contribution Margin Method

The contribution margin method has two key equations.

contribution margin method1

$80,000

40%

Break-even point in

total sales dollars

= $200,000 break-even sales

Fixed expenses

CM ratio

=

Contribution Margin Method

Let’s use the contribution margin method to calculate the break-even point in total sales dollars at Racing.

quick check18
Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales in units?

872 cups

b. 3,611 cups

c. 1,200 cups

d. 1,150 cups

Quick Check 
quick check19

Fixed expenses

Unit CM

Break-even =

$1,300

$1.49/cup - $0.36/cup

=

$1,300

$1.13/cup

=

= 1,150 cups

Quick Check 

Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales in units?

a. 872 cups

b. 3,611 cups

c. 1,200 cups

d. 1,150 cups

quick check20
Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales in dollars?

a. $1,300

b. $1,715

c. $1,788

d. $3,129

Quick Check 
quick check21

Fixed expenses

CM Ratio

Break-evensales

=

$1,300

0.758

=

= $1,715

Quick Check 

Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the break-even sales in dollars?

a. $1,300

b. $1,715

c. $1,788

d. $3,129

target profit analysis
Target Profit Analysis

The equation and contribution margin methods can be used to determine the sales volume needed to achieve a target profit.

Suppose Racing Bicycle Company wants to know how many bikes must be sold to earn a profit of $100,000.

the cvp equation method
The CVP Equation Method

Sales = Variable expenses + Fixed expenses + Profits

$500Q = $300Q + $80,000 +$100,000

$200Q = $180,000

Q =900 bikes

the contribution margin approach

Unit sales to attain

the target profit

Fixed expenses + Target profit

Unit contribution margin

=

$80,000 + $100,000

$200/bike

=900 bikes

The Contribution Margin Approach

The contribution margin method can be used to determine that 900 bikes must be sold to earn the target profit of $100,000.

quick check22
Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. How many cups of coffee would have to be sold to attain target profits of $2,500 per month?

a. 3,363 cups

b. 2,212 cups

c. 1,150 cups

d. 4,200 cups

Quick Check 
quick check23

Unit salesto attaintarget profit

Fixed expenses + Target profit

Unit CM

=

$1,300 + $2,500

$1.49 - $0.36

=

$3,800

$1.13

=

= 3,363 cups

Quick Check 

Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. How many cups of coffee would have to be sold to attain target profits of $2,500 per month?

a. 3,363 cups

b. 2,212 cups

c. 1,150 cups

d. 4,200 cups

the margin of safety
The margin of safety is the excess of budgeted (or actual) sales over the break-even volume of sales.The Margin of Safety

Margin of safety = Total sales - Break-even sales

Let’s look at Racing Bicycle Company and determine the margin of safety.

the margin of safety1
If we assume that Racing Bicycle Company has actual sales of $250,000, given that we have already determined the break-even sales to be $200,000, the margin of safety is $50,000 as shownThe Margin of Safety
the margin of safety3
The margin of safety can be expressed in terms of the number of units sold. The margin of safety at Racing is $50,000, and each bike sells for $500.

Margin ofSafety in units

$50,000$500

=

= 100 bikes

The Margin of Safety
quick check24
Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the margin of safety?

a. 3,250 cups

b. 950 cups

c. 1,150 cups

d. 2,100 cups

Quick Check 
quick check25

Margin of safety = Total sales – Break-even sales

= 2,100 cups – 1,150 cups

= 950 cups

or

950 cups

2,100 cups

Margin of safety percentage

=

= 45%

Quick Check 

Coffee Klatch is an espresso stand in a downtown office building. The average selling price of a cup of coffee is $1.49 and the average variable expense per cup is $0.36. The average fixed expense per month is $1,300. 2,100 cups are sold each month on average. What is the margin of safety?

a. 3,250 cups

b. 950 cups

c. 1,150 cups

d. 2,100 cups

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