Telecommunication Needs for the Internet Infrastructure in Bangladesh
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Telecommunication Needs for the Internet Infrastructure in Bangladesh Presentation at the Workshop on Nationwide Internet Access & Online Applications Dhaka, Bangladesh Professor Saifur Rahman, Director Manisa Pipattanasomporn, Graduate Student Alexandria Research Institute Virginia Tech

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Telecommunication Needs for the Internet Infrastructure in BangladeshPresentation at the Workshop on Nationwide Internet Access & Online ApplicationsDhaka, Bangladesh

Professor Saifur Rahman, Director

Manisa Pipattanasomporn, Graduate Student

Alexandria Research Institute

Virginia Tech

23 May 2004


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IT Facts in Bangladesh Bangladesh

  • 50 telephone lines and 3 Internet users per 10,000 population

  • High installation charge of roughly $200 for a new telephone line

  • Long waiting time for a new connection of 2-4 years


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Themes for Discussion Bangladesh

  • Review existing IT infrastructures in Bangladesh

  • Review various access technologies

  • Identify least-cost ICT solutions for Internet access in Bangladesh


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Broad Benefits from ICT Bangladesh

  • ICT for Education

  • ICT for Health

  • ICT for Economic Opportunity

  • ICT for Empowerment and Participation


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Source: BBC News Bangladesh

Source: BBC News

ICT for Education

Wireless web reaches village children

“Using computers to assist in teaching mathematics”

“ Primary school children are introduced to computers using multimedia CDs.”

Schools in remote villages can serve as a venue for adult education, health care and small business activities


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ICT for Health Bangladesh

  • Online medical centers to provide better care for the sick

  • CD-ROMs to show how to better treat patients

  • Transmission of tests to the hub in the capital city for analysis

New horizons for Bangladeshi doctors

“The telecentre in Sonagazi”

Source: BBC News


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ICT for Economic Opportunity Bangladesh

ICT can contribute to better marketing opportunities through access to information on:

  • Weather

  • Farming best practice

  • Crop status

  • Global market price


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ICT for Empowerment and Participation Bangladesh

State of Madhya Pradesh, India

  • Faster and more transparent access to government services.

  • Farmers can get copies of land titles for 10 cents (previously $100 from corrupt officials).

ICT contributes to fostering empowerment, and making government processes more efficient.


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Existing IT Infrastructure in Bangladesh Bangladesh

  • Satellite

  • Microwave Links

  • Optical Fiber Links

  • Cellular Coverage


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Satellite & BangladeshMicrowave Links

  • Satellite is the only way to communicate internationally

  • Microwave links are the major communication backbone of the country

  • Microwave speed range from 34-155 Mbps

Source: BTTB Annual Report 2001


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Fiber Links & BangladeshCellular Coverage

Grameen Coverage as of March 2004

Railway lines

  • Backbone is transferred from microwave links to optical fiber links

  • Roughly 1,800-km fiber is installed along 2,900-km railway track

  • Leased by Grameen telephone to spread telecom footprint across the country

Source: www.gsmworld.com


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  • Last-Mile Technologies Bangladesh

  • Wireline: POTS, DSL, Cable Modem

  • Wireless:

  • Fixed Wireless (WLL, LMDS, MMDS, VSAT)

  • Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)

  • Wireless Metropolitan Area Network (WMAN)

  • Wireless Wide Area Network (WWAN)

Internet Access Alternatives

< 35km

> 35km


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Telephone Bangladesh

PSTN

Modem

Router

Modem

Internet

Computer

ISP

POTS/DSL

POTS = Plain Old Telephone Service (56 Kbps)

DSL = Digital Subscriber Line (768 Kbps)

  • POTS:simplest way to connect to Internet, just modem and PC

  • DSL: a high-speed connection via a telephone lines


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Cable Modem Bangladesh

Delivering high-speed Internet services over cable TV systems (0.5-1Mbps)

  • A splitter splits the signal to TV outlets and the cable modem

  • Cable modem connects directly to the PC


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WLL provides: Bangladesh

Simultaneous telephone and Internet connection (35-70kbps)

Source: www.srtelecom.com

CorDECT WLL

  • CorDECT WLL = Wireless Local Loop based on DECT standard

  • CorDECT WLL has been used extensively in India for rural telecommunication

Repeater

End user

End user

Base Station


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MMDS/LMDS Bangladesh

  • MMDS:support max 3.2Mbps per base station, maximum coverage of 20-km NLOS

  • LMDS: support max 155Mbps, maximum coverage of 3 km with LOS connection


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Wireless Local Area Network Bangladesh(WLAN 802.11)

  • Operates in unlicensed bands

  • Provides speed of up to 54Mbps with 802.11a and up to 11Mbps with 802.11b

  • Coverage 100-300 meters

Wireless Card

Access Point


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WMAN 802.16 Bangladesh

Up to 50 km

  • 802.16 provides path between subscriber sites and a core network

  • It can provide 60 customers with T-1 speed, range of 50km

  • 802.11 can add mobility to users in the building

  • Recently introduced, late 2003


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Mobile Broadband Bangladesh(WMAN 802.20)

  • 802.20 seeks to boost real-time data transmission rate to 1 Mbps or more.

  • Cell ranges of up to 15 kms or more.

  • Deliver speed to mobile users traveling at speeds up to 250 km/h.

  • Availability: 2005 or later


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WWAN Bangladesh

WWAN uses cellular networks to enable Internet connection from cellular phones.

  • Require infrastructure changes, e.g. new base station add-on and software upgrade and new handsets


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VSAT Bangladesh

VSAT = Very Small Aperture Terminal

  • 2.4 m or smaller disk

  • Provide connection in areas with no infrastructure


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Evaluating Last-Mile Options Bangladesh

  • Cost of ownership

POTS

DSL

Cable Modem

WLL

MMDS

LMDS

802.11

802.16

802.20

VSAT

POTS

DSL

Cable Modem

WLL

MMDS

LMDS

802.11

802.16

802.20

VSAT

  • Coverage distance

  • Data rate


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Evaluating Last-Mile Options Bangladesh

WLL

* Bangladesh FOB price based on a quote from an Indian company (2003)

** Data from “Licensing New Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Operators in Private Sector in Bangladesh”, BTRC (2003)

  • Coverage distance 10-35km

  • Data rate 35/70 kbps


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Evaluating Last-Mile Options Bangladesh

MMDS

* Price based on a quote from a US company (2003)

** Data from “Licensing New Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Operators in Private Sector in Bangladesh”, BTRC (2003)

  • Coverage distance 25km

  • Data rate Max 3.2Mbps


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Evaluating Last-Mile Options Bangladesh

802.16

* Price based on a quote from www.jts.net/724-36MicrowaveRadio.htm (2004)

** Data from “Licensing New Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Operators in Private Sector in Bangladesh”, BTRC (2003)

  • Coverage distance 35km

  • Data rate 24Mbps effective


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Evaluating Last-Mile Options Bangladesh

VSAT

* Price based on Sustainable Development Networking Program (SDNBD)

www.sdnbd.org/sdi/issues/IT-computer/IT_Revolution_A_Millennium_Opportunity.htm

** Data from “Licensing New Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) Operators in Private Sector in Bangladesh”, BTRC (2003)

  • Coverage distance few km with copper wire

  • Data rate 64kbps – 2Mbps


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Costs Comparison– user perspective Bangladesh

  • * Sharable bandwidth


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Other Costs Bangladesh

  • Access charge to use PSTN from BTTB: BTTB charges a one-time registration fee of Tk10,000; installation and testing fee of Tk30,000 at 2Mbps; and a rental fee of Tk76,000 per annum.

  • Personal Wireless Services: these may include wireless design services, site survey services, wireless engineering services, installation and maintenance support.

  • Other costs: these may include cost of towers, recurring costs, end-user equipment, housing infrastructure and power supply.


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Area: Bangladesh 144,000 km2- Flat terrain

Population:133 million people (925 persons/km2)

Infrastructure:optical fiber, cellular tower, microwave station

ICT Solution for Bangladesh

Take a closer look at a target country: Bangladesh

With existing infrastructures, WLL or 802.16 are least-cost options. In any case, backbone must be able to support data needed at base stations


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Possibility for Nationwide Telecom-and-Internet Access in Bangladesh

  • In Bangladesh, about 90% of the population could be served by as few as 25 towers with multiple base stations using WLL or 802.16 technologies.

35 km coverage


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Conclusions Bangladesh

  • Least-Cost ICT Solution for Bangladesh

    Recommend WLL or 802.16 for Bangladesh. Per unit cost will depend on number of clients that can be served from one location

To this end, the proposed solutions will vary depending on the available ICT infrastructure, applications, speed requirements, and ability to pay for the services.