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Java Look-and-Feel Design Guidelines Application Graphics Behavior Cross-Platform Color Problem: your graphics/color schemes/ etc. may be displayed on a number of platforms, configs bit depth determines number of available colors: 8 bits -> 256 colors 16 bits ->64K colors

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java look and feel design guidelines

Java Look-and-Feel Design Guidelines

Application Graphics

Behavior

cross platform color
Cross-Platform Color
  • Problem:
    • your graphics/color schemes/ etc. may be displayed on a number of platforms, configs
    • bit depth determines number of available colors:
      • 8 bits -> 256 colors
      • 16 bits ->64K colors
      • 24 bits -> 16 million + colors
problem continued
Problem, continued
  • Specific colors available depend on way target platform allocates colors.
  • Different systems have different “standard palettes”, don’t necessarily overlap from one platform to another.
  • System may “dither” colors to try to get close match to specified color – can cause strong patterned appearance.
solutions
Solutions
  • for web applications, choose from palette of 216 “web-safe” colors
  • design with possibility of dithering in mind (more on this later)
graphics file formats
Graphics File formats
  • GIF (Graphics Interchange Format)
    • common format for application graphics in the Java look and feel.
    • tend to be smaller on disk and in memory than JPEG files.
    • includes a color table (or palette) of up to 256 colors.
    • lossless
  • JPEG (named after its developers, the Joint Photographic Experts Group).
    • generally better suited for photographs than for the more symbolic style of icons, button graphics, and corporate type and logos.
    • uses a lossy compression algorithm
slide6
On 8-bit systems, some of the colors specified in a GIF file will be unavailable if they are not part of the system\'s current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.
  • On 16-bit and 24-bit systems, more colors are available and different sets of colors can be used in different GIF files.
to avoid coarse dithering patterns
To avoid coarse dithering patterns:

add gradient / pattern to reduced perception of dithering ....

icon design step by step
Icon design, step by step
  • See ch. 5 “Drawing icons”
also of interest in ch 5
Also of interest in Ch. 5
  • Designing:
    • button graphics
    • symbols
    • splash screens
    • About boxes
behavior the feel part of l f
Behavior: the “feel” part of L&F
  • Mouse operations:
    • assume a two-button mouse.
    • Use mouse button 1 (usually the left button) for selection, activation of components, dragging, and the display of drop-down menus.
    • Use mouse button 2 (usually the right button) to display contextual menus.
    • Do not use the middle mouse button; it is not available on most target platforms.
mouse operations continued
Mouse operations, continued
  •  Provide keyboard equivalents for all mouse operations, including multiple selections.
  •  Be aware:
    • Macintosh systems usually have a one-button mouse
    • Other personal computers and network computers usually have a two-button mouse
    • UNIX systems usually have a three-button mouse.
    • Macintosh users can simulate mouse button 2 by holding down the Control key while mousing.
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