Java look and feel design guidelines
Download
1 / 13

javalandf - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 216 Views
  • Updated On :

Java Look-and-Feel Design Guidelines Application Graphics Behavior Cross-Platform Color Problem: your graphics/color schemes/ etc. may be displayed on a number of platforms, configs bit depth determines number of available colors: 8 bits -> 256 colors 16 bits ->64K colors

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'javalandf' - issac


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Java look and feel design guidelines l.jpg

Java Look-and-Feel Design Guidelines

Application Graphics

Behavior


Cross platform color l.jpg
Cross-Platform Color

  • Problem:

    • your graphics/color schemes/ etc. may be displayed on a number of platforms, configs

    • bit depth determines number of available colors:

      • 8 bits -> 256 colors

      • 16 bits ->64K colors

      • 24 bits -> 16 million + colors


Problem continued l.jpg
Problem, continued

  • Specific colors available depend on way target platform allocates colors.

  • Different systems have different “standard palettes”, don’t necessarily overlap from one platform to another.

  • System may “dither” colors to try to get close match to specified color – can cause strong patterned appearance.


Solutions l.jpg
Solutions

  • for web applications, choose from palette of 216 “web-safe” colors

  • design with possibility of dithering in mind (more on this later)


Graphics file formats l.jpg
Graphics File formats

  • GIF (Graphics Interchange Format)

    • common format for application graphics in the Java look and feel.

    • tend to be smaller on disk and in memory than JPEG files.

    • includes a color table (or palette) of up to 256 colors.

    • lossless

  • JPEG (named after its developers, the Joint Photographic Experts Group).

    • generally better suited for photographs than for the more symbolic style of icons, button graphics, and corporate type and logos.

    • uses a lossy compression algorithm


Slide6 l.jpg

  • On 8-bit systems, some of the colors specified in a GIF file will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.

  • On 16-bit and 24-bit systems, more colors are available and different sets of colors can be used in different GIF files.


To avoid coarse dithering patterns l.jpg
To avoid coarse dithering patterns: will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.

add gradient / pattern to reduced perception of dithering ....


Still result varies with platform l.jpg
Still, result varies with platform will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.


Icon design step by step l.jpg
Icon design, step by step will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.

  • See ch. 5 “Drawing icons”


Also of interest in ch 5 l.jpg
Also of interest in Ch. 5 will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.

  • Designing:

    • button graphics

    • symbols

    • splash screens

    • About boxes


Behavior the feel part of l f l.jpg
Behavior: the “feel” part of L&F will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.

  • Mouse operations:

    • assume a two-button mouse.

    • Use mouse button 1 (usually the left button) for selection, activation of components, dragging, and the display of drop-down menus.

    • Use mouse button 2 (usually the right button) to display contextual menus.

    • Do not use the middle mouse button; it is not available on most target platforms.


Mouse operations continued l.jpg
Mouse operations, continued will be unavailable if they are not part of the system's current color palette. These unavailable colors will be dithered by the system.

  •  Provide keyboard equivalents for all mouse operations, including multiple selections.

  •  Be aware:

    • Macintosh systems usually have a one-button mouse

    • Other personal computers and network computers usually have a two-button mouse

    • UNIX systems usually have a three-button mouse.

    • Macintosh users can simulate mouse button 2 by holding down the Control key while mousing.


ad