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Super Fantastic Grammar Day!. Six sentence errors you need to know. If I see one in your summative, I am going to lose it!. Comma Splice. Easiest to recognize, yet most common sentence error: just look for commas in your work. Comma splices join two complete sentences with a comma.

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super fantastic grammar day

Super Fantastic Grammar Day!

Six sentence errors you need to know. If I see one in your summative, I am going to lose it!

comma splice
Comma Splice
  • Easiest to recognize, yet most common sentence error: just look for commas in your work.
  • Comma splices join two complete sentences with a comma.
  • How do we know we have a comma splice?
  • Joey went to the grocery store, he needed to buy eggs for supper.
    • This sentence is incorrect because “Joey went to the grocery store” and “he needed to buy eggs for supper” are both complete sentences.
comma splice1
Comma Splice
  • How do we rehabilitate comma splice outlaws?
  • There are three main methods of fixing comma splices:

1. We can separate them into two sentences by replacing the comma with a period.

    • Joey went to the grocery store. He needed to buy eggs for supper.
comma splice2
Comma Splice

2. We can replace the comma with a semi-colon.

  • Joey went to the grocery store; he needed to buy eggs for supper.

* You can only use a semi-colon when both complete sentences are related. The following is incorrect: Joey went to the grocery store; his dog is named Josh.

A semicolon is a relative of the period NOT the comma!

comma splice3
Comma Splice

3. We can replace the comma with a conjunction

- Joey went to the store because he needed to buy eggs for supper.

  • Now never make a comma splice error ever again! PROMISE? Say you promise!
run on sentence
Run On Sentence
  • Run-on sentences join two or more complete sentences with no punctuation.
  • How do we know we have a run-on sentence?
  • Michaela loves to draw horses she is a talented artist.
    • This sentence is incorrect because “Michaela loves to draw horses” and “she is a talented artist” can both stand as complete sentences.
run on sentences
Run On Sentences
  • How do we rehabilitate run on outlaws?
  • There are three main methods of fixing them:
    • Add a period
    • Add a semicolon
    • Add a conjunction
run on sentences1
Run On Sentences
  • Michaela loves to draw horses she is a talented artist.
    • Michaela loves to draw horses. She is a talented artist.
    • Michaela loves to draw horses; she is a talented artist.
    • Michaela loves to draw horses, as she is a talented artist.
sentence fragment
Sentence Fragment
  • There are two parts to every sentence: a subject and a predicate.
  • The subject is who or what the sentence is about.
  • The predicate is the verb or action
  • Example: The girl with the red hair is eating an apple.
    • Subject: The girl with the red hair
    • Predicate: is eating an apple.
sentence fragment1
Sentence Fragment
  • A sentence fragment is when you leave out the subject or the predicate.
  • Sentence fragments are easy to identify when reading your work out loud; they just don’t sound right.
sentence fragment2
Sentence Fragment
  • Examples:
    • Tom and Cindy, who went to the movie.
    • Because she went downstairs.
    • While she did the laundry.
    • When the principal announced the assembly.
    • Because the movie was too scary.
    • Since we cleaned our room.
    • Megan and Christy, amateur detectives.
subject verb agreement
Subject/Verb Agreement
  • Steps for avoiding subject-verb embarrassment:
    • Find the main verb
    • Find the subject of the verb
    • Is the subject singular or plural?
    • If your subject is singular, match it with the correct verb. If your subject is plural, match them with the correct verb.
subject verb agreement1
Subject/Verb Agreement

Rules for subject-verb agreement:

  • Subjects connected by and are plural: Bob and Henry are here.
  • Certain expressions (as well as, including, together with, with, etc.) logically seem to change a singular subject to plural. They don’t. These expressions will be set off from the subject by commas.
    • Bob, along with Dianne and Henry¸ is going on vacation.
    • Henry, as well as Bob, plans to vacation in his living room.
subject verb agreement2
Subject/Verb Agreement
  • Singular subjects connected by a conjunction such as either-or, neither-nor, nor stay singular: Neither Bob nor Henry is able to get up from the couch.
  • If a singular and plural subject are connected by either- or, neither-nor, or, nor the verb should agree with the subject closer to it.
    • Neither Bob nor the otherswere able to get off the couch.
    • Neither the others nor Bob is able to get off the couch.
subject verb agreement3
Subject/Verb Agreement
  • Collective nouns such as family, committee, jury, crowd, and group are almost always singular. “People” is an example of a collective noun that is plural.
  • Numbers that represent a single unit are singular.
    • A million dollars is a lot of money to keep under your mattress
    • Ten years is a long time to be without work
faulty verb tense
Faulty Verb Tense

All I have to say about this is:

USE PRESENT TENSE IN YOUR ESSAY!

Unless you are talking about Golding, because he is dead and therefore past tense.

misplaced modifier
Misplaced Modifier
  • These ones make me laugh because they are so ridiculous:
  • The native woman was carrying a heavy jar on her head which was filled with water.
  • I left the house just as the sun rose and went fishing.
  • I have read the diary that my sister wrote many times.
  • He struck the goldfish bowl with his head which was fortunately empty.
  • A silk umbrella was lost by a wealthy gentleman with a carved head.
commas
Commas
  • You are comma abusers!
  • Put commas where, if you were reading something out loud, you would have a natural pause.
  • With conjunctions, you need a comma if both sides of the conjunction can stand alone.
    • EXAMPLE: I bought a CD player, and we listened to Carla’s CD’s.
    • EXAMPLE: I bought a CD player and listened to Carla’s CD’s.
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