Fermi observation of gamma ray bursts shedding lights on prompt emission models
Download
1 / 24

Fermi observation of Gamma-ray Bursts: shedding lights on prompt emission models - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 74 Views
  • Uploaded on

Fermi observation of Gamma-ray Bursts: shedding lights on prompt emission models. Yizhong Fan (Niels Bohr International Academy, Denmark Purple Mountain Observatory, China). Fan (2009, MNRAS) and Fan & Piran (2008, Phys. Fron. China). MeV-GeV emission from GRBs (EAGRET).

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Fermi observation of Gamma-ray Bursts: shedding lights on prompt emission models' - isla


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Fermi observation of gamma ray bursts shedding lights on prompt emission models

Fermi observation of Gamma-ray Bursts: shedding lights on prompt emission models

Yizhong Fan

(Niels Bohr International Academy, Denmark

Purple Mountain Observatory, China)

Fan (2009, MNRAS) and Fan & Piran (2008, Phys. Fron. China)


Mev gev emission from grbs eagret
MeV-GeV prompt emission models emission from GRBs (EAGRET)

GRB afterglow detection for the first time!

GRB 940217

(Hurley et al. 1994)


Mev gev emission from grbs egret
MeV-GeV prompt emission models emission from GRBs (EGRET)

GRB 941017

(Gonzalez et al. 2003)

Much longer high energy emission

Quick evolution

Almost constant


Theoretical predictions before fermi see fan piran 2008 for a review
Theoretical predictions—before Fermi prompt emission models(see Fan & Piran 2008 for a review)

(Pe’er & Waxman 2004; Pilla & Loeb 1998;

Gupta & Zhang 2007)

(Fan, Piran, Narayan & Wei 2008)


Fermi grbs with gev emission
Fermi GRBs with GeV emission prompt emission models

  • GRB 080916C (Abdo et al. 2009)

  • GRB 081024B (Omodei et al. 2008)

  • GRB 090217 (Ohno et al. 2009a)

  • GRB 090323 (Ohno et al. 2009b)

  • GRB 090328 (Cutini et al. 2009)

  • GRB 090510 (Ohno & Pelassa 2009c)

  • One detection once a month, as expected (assuming Band spectrum of GRBs, i.e., no GeV excess in most GRBs)


The delayed onset of the 100 mev emission
The delayed onset of the >100 MeV emission prompt emission models

(Abdo et al. 2009)


Extended high energy emission abdo et al 2009
Extended high energy emission prompt emission models(Abdo et al. 2009)


Main properties of the fermi grbs
Main properties of the Fermi GRBs prompt emission models

  • No GeV spectrum excess detected in almost all GRBs

  • The delay of arrival of the >100 MeV photons

  • The extended high energy emission from both short and long bursts


Interpreting the non detection of the gev spectrum excess in most grbs fan 2009
Interpreting the non-detection of prompt emission modelsthe GeV spectrum excess in most GRBs (Fan 2009)

Poynting-flux dominated outflow model

  • Gradual magnetic energy dissipation (e.g., Giannios 2007): The strong magnetic field in the emitting region suppresses the SSC and the electrons are only mildly-relativistic

  • Sudden energy dissipation at R~1E16 cm (Lyutikov & Blandford 2003): the SSC is in the extreme Klein-Nishina regime


Interpreting the non detection of the gev spectrum excess in most grbs fan 20091
Interpreting the non-detection of prompt emission modelsthe GeV spectrum excess in most GRBs (Fan 2009)

Standard internal-shock model

(The SSC in the extreme

Klein-Nishina regime?)


Interpreting the non-detection of prompt emission modelsthe GeV spectrum excess in most GRBs (Fan 2009)

Mildly (0.1<sigma<1) magnetized internal shocks

  • The strong magnetic field in the emitting region suppresses the SSC, and the synchrotron spectrum may be very soft


Interpreting the non-detection of prompt emission modelsthe GeV spectrum excess in most GRBs (Fan 2009)

Photosphere-internal shock model

  • The electrons are assumed to be only mildly-relativistic (Thompson et al. 2007)


Interpreting the delayed onset of the 100 mev emission fan 2009
Interpreting the delayed onset of the prompt emission models>100 MeV emission (Fan 2009)

  • In both collapsar and compact star merger models, the early outflow likely suffers more serious baryon pollution and thus has a smaller bulk Lorentz factor than the late ejecta. The GeV photons can not escape from the early outflow

  • In the collapsar scenario, before the breakout, the initial outflow is choked by the envelope material of the progenitor (Zhang, W. et al. 2003). The emission of the breaking out materialmay be dominated by the quasi-thermal radiation from the photosphere and may last a few seconds


The extended high energy emission from both short and long bursts
The extended high energy emission prompt emission models from both short and long bursts

(see Fan & Piran 2008 for a review)

  • Synchrotron and SSC radiation of the forward/reverse shocks (e.g., Meszaros & Rees 1994; Dermer et al. 2000; Sari & Esin 2001; Zhang et al. 2001; Wang et al. 2001a, b; Wei & Fan 2007; Gou et al. 2007; Yu et al. 2008; Fan et al. 2008; Galli & Piro 2008; Zou et al. 2009)

  • External inverse Compton in reverse/forward shock regions (e.g., Beloborodov 2005; Fan et al. 2005; Wang et al. 2006; Fan & Piran 2006; Wang & Meszaros 2006; Fan et al. 2008; Zou et al. 2009)

  • SSC radiation of the extended prompt emission (e.g., Wei et al. 2006; Wang et al. 2006; Fan et al. 2008; Galli & Guetta 2008; Yu & Dai 2009; Zou et al. 2009)

Predicted high energy emission from the

naked-eye burst GRB 080319B (Zou, Fan

& Piran 2009)


Are the grb outflows magnetic rather than baryonic
Are the GRB outflows magnetic prompt emission models rather than baryonic?


The non-detection of GeV spectrum excess by prompt emission models Fermi in almost all GRBs: magnetic fireball? (Fan & Piran 2008; Fan 2009: arXiv:0905.0908)

synchrotron

SSC

(magnetized fireball)


Possible evidence for the magnetized outflow model
Possible evidence for the magnetized outflow model prompt emission models

Prompt emission

Reverse shock emission?

=magnetic energy density/particle energy density


The low energy spectrum crisis in the case of a baryonic fireball
The low energy spectrum crisis in the prompt emission models case of a baryonic fireball

(Cohen et al. 1997; Preece et al. 1998)

The magnetic field generated in the shocks is very, very low or decays quickly?


A possible solution in the case of baryonic fireball derishev et al 2001 derishev 2007
A possible solution in the case of baryonic fireball? prompt emission models(Derishev et al. 2001; Derishev 2007)

Pro: For typical GRB parameters, within the synchrotron radiation model, the SSC of electrons emitting X-rays is very likely in Klein-Nishina regime

Cons:

1. Fine tuning of microphysical parameters

2. Only for hard GRBs (not for X-ray flashes and X-ray flares)


Magnetic fireball spectrum problem
Magnetic fireball: spectrum problem prompt emission models

(Giannios 2007: gradual magnetic dissipation)

GRB 080916C


Poynting flux dominated outflow model prompt emission models

(Lyutikov & Blandford 2003: sudden magnetic dissipation)


Synchrotron radiation sudden magnetic dissipation in preparation
Synchrotron radiation: sudden magnetic dissipation prompt emission models(in preparation)


Summary
Summary prompt emission models

  • The non-detection of GeV spectrum excess in almost all GRBs can be well understood in a number of scenarios. The simplest interpretation may be the magnetized outflow model.

  • The delayed onset of the >100 MeV photons may reflect the physical condition of the early outflow (in particular the breaking out material in the collapsar scenario)

  • For the magnetic fireball, there is a serious low-energy spectrum problem. For the baryonic fireball, there might be more freedom (for example, a hard low energy spectrum can be obtained if the magnetic field generated in the shocks is very, very low or decays quickly).


ad