Strategies for using programme and task design to deter students from plagiarism
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Strategies for using programme and task design to deter students from plagiarism . Jude Carroll. Three strategies for using assessment to deter plagiarism. Setting ‘Make’ not ‘find’ tasks Getting students started: no ‘last minute’ production

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Strategies for using programme and task design to deter students from plagiarism

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Strategies for using programme and task design to deter students from plagiarism

Strategies for using programme and task design to deter students from plagiarism

Jude Carroll


Three strategies for using assessment to deter plagiarism

Three strategies for using assessment to deter plagiarism

  • Setting ‘Make’ not ‘find’ tasks

  • Getting students started: no ‘last minute’ production

  • ‘It’s not worth trying’ designing in avoidance opportunities


Deterrence by encouraging students to make an answer rather than find an answer

Deterrence by encouraging students to ‘make an answer’rather than ‘find an answer’


You say why one would encourage one deter plagiarism

You say why one would encourage, one deter plagiarism.

What factors influence the success or failure of speculators on the commodities market?

Download a current set of commodity futures prices

[then five questions about how to analyse and interrogate the download]. If your answer to (5) shows an imperfect hedge result, explain the probable main reasons for this. If your result is a perfect hedge, explain why this is unexpected given this is a contango market. Rank the factors relevant to the success or otherwise of speculating in this example. Explain the ranking. Rosser, U of Coventry, 2008


What makes one better

What makes one better?

Download some data. Analyse it

Make a judgment [perfect hedge or imperfect hedge?]

Justify your judgement.

Explain the unexpected in a specific context [a contango market]

Rank the factors relevant to the success or otherwise of speculating in this example.

Individualised

Using the data

Applied theory in a specific context

‘Higher order thinking’


Strategies for using programme and task design to deter students from plagiarism

NO: An essay on ‘smoking and public health’

YES???: Find 3 ‘stop smoking’ websites. Create criteria to judge which will best improve public health. Rank them as being worth funding. Justify your ranking.

YES??: Select xxx recent decisions w. impact on smoking. Which are most / least likely to have a positive impact? Why? Draft advice to a government committee to strengthen the decision - include quantitative data.

YES??: Here’s a case study, evaluate it against xxx criteria.

YES:? Be ready to debate, ‘The best way to improve public health is to stop people smoking’. [variation: write the script in class]

YES: Imagine you are xxx trying to convince yyy to fund a ‘stop-smoking’ campaign. Prioritise your arguments + support each one with cited evidence from recent reliable studies.


Blocks to this suggestion

Blocks to this suggestion?

  • Time and timing ( to create, to mark ….)

  • ‘Tried and tested’

  • Spotting one’s own

  • Choosing the wrong method for checking….

    How might these be addressed? Any ideas?


Strategies linked to constructivist learning theory

Strategies linked to constructivist learning theory

Make the students start early (stages, drafts, chunks…..)

Make the process visible and public (peer review, posting, observed)

Make the process valuable (assessed, reviewed, reflected)

Make the task significant (authentic, personal, individual)


Strategies linked to avoiding punishment

Strategies linked to avoiding punishment

Authentication activities

Severe penalties for deliberate cheating & fraud

Students aware of past consequences for students


Summing up can assessment design deter students from plagiarism

Summing up: Can assessment design deter students from plagiarism?

Programme level: Designing IN chances to learn and practice

Task level: Designing OUT opportunities for easy copying and taking

Policy level: Designing penalties that shape decisions


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