Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 43

“SG-Systems” (Smart Grid – Operational Applications Integration) “Boot Camp” Overview PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 77 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

“SG-Systems” (Smart Grid – Operational Applications Integration) “Boot Camp” Overview. Brent Hodges, Chair, SG-Systems. Greg Robinson, Co-Chair, SG-Systems. Agenda. 3:00 Introductions and Brief Overview of SG-Systems (Greg)

Download Presentation

“SG-Systems” (Smart Grid – Operational Applications Integration) “Boot Camp” Overview

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

“SG-Systems”(Smart Grid – Operational Applications Integration)“Boot Camp” Overview

Brent Hodges,

Chair, SG-Systems

Greg Robinson,

Co-Chair, SG-Systems


Agenda

Agenda

  • 3:00 Introductions and Brief Overview of SG-Systems (Greg)

  • 3:15 Requirements Gathering – Use Cases and System Requirements Overview with AMI-Ent example (Joe or Shawn)

  • 3:30 Service Definitions Process with AMI-Ent example (Shawn)

  • 3:45 OpenADE (Steve or Dave)

  • 4:00 OpenADR (Albert or Bruce)

  • 4:15 OpenHAN (Mary or Erich)

  • 4:30 EIM Task Force (Greg)

  • 4:45 General discussion, questions & answers

  • 5:00 Adjourn


Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

New EIM

Task Force


Nist conceptual model

NIST Conceptual Model

[Source: NIST Interim Roadmap]


Business drivers

Business Drivers

  • Interoperability requires many standards in a profile stack

  • The SDO process is relatively slow & needs more user input

    • Work collaboratively with SDOs to ensure common user requirements are addressed

    • Facilitate standards development by proposing potential solutions for addressing gaps in existing standards.

      • The SDO ultimately determines when and how its standards are updated based on input.

  • For Information Standards, resolve (don’t add to) semantic chaos

    • Avoid having the same information defined with different names, varying definitions, etc.

    • Ensure same information standards can be used across different communication profiles

    • While mapping to other standards will be unavoidable, strive to use, correct and extend one information model standard:

      • The IEC TC57 Common Information Model (CIM) is the default information model for this purpose.

  • There is substantial information overlap among AMI, ADE, HAN and ADR

    • While requirements and services vary significantly, they can be built using the same information model.


The cim is the basis for a common systems language for utilities

The CIM is the Basis for a Common Systems Language for Utilities

The same dictionary is used for multiple forms of human communication:

Letters

Phone calls

Conversations

Emails

Etc.

In similar manner, the same CIM is used for multiple forms of computer communication:

XML

RDF

OWL

DDL

Etc.

One Dictionary

Supports Many

Forms of Communication

7

Proprietary and Confidential


Sg systems wg scope

SG-Systems WG:

The SG-Systems Working Group defines requirements, policies, and services, based on utility industry standards such as the Common Information Model (CIM), required for information exchange from and to utility enterprise back office systems and between these back office systems and data acquisition and control servers (e.g., MDMS, AMI Head Ends, SCADA, etc.).

Task forces are established on an as needed basis to accomplish these goals for specific functional areas. In addition to work performed by their ‘vertical team,’ Task Force Chairs act as matrix managers to ensure their functional requirements are met through the ‘horizontal teams’ supporting them.

‘Horizontal Teams’ are ongoing, providing consistent artifacts for each increment of functionality that is requested of them by the functional (vertical) teams.

SG-Systems WG Scope


Sg systems wg process overview

NIST

EPRI,

MultiSpeak

SG-Systems WG Process Overview

HomePlug

& ZigBee

SE 2.0

IEC TC57 WG14,

OASIS, IEEE

Other SDOs

Use Cases

From SCE

and others

Task Forces

Business-Oriented,

Common Format

Use Cases Based on SRS Reference Model

System Requirements

(SRS) Team

Use Case

Team

SG-Security

WG

Service Definitions

Team

  • Integration Requirements

  • Patterns

  • Sequence Diagram

  • Services

  • WSDL

  • Recommendations to IEC TC57 WG14:

  • Proposed CIM Extensions

  • Message Schemas Updates

  • Requirements Updates

  • Recommendations to other SDOs

SG-Conformity

Working Group


Key collaboration concept for the sg systems working group

Key Collaboration Concept for the SG-Systems Working Group

Standard building blocks are defined by IEC, other Standards Development Organizations, and industry groups:

e.g., OAISIS, Open Applications Group (OAG), MultiSpeak, OGC

Requirements (use cases) are gathered from helpful sources

Utilities

Industry initiatives

The SG-Systems WG articulates Industry Best Practices(see next slide) that satisfy requirements through the use of industry standard building blocks.

Ideas for recommended extensions and changes to standard building blocks are provided back to appropriate standards bodies.

SG-Systems WG

February 2010


Our focus finding developing best practices making them into vetted industry best practices

Utility’s

Projects

- Design &

Implementations

---------------

Utility’s

Architecture

-----------------------

Industry Best Practices

Interoperability Testing

---------------------------------

Industry Best Practices

------------------------------------------

Standards Conformance &

Interoperability Testing

-----------------------------------------------------

Industry Standards

Our Focus: Finding/Developing Best Practices & Making Them into Vetted “Industry Best Practices”

  • Local Utility Projects

  • Consortiums & User Groups like OpenSG (business requirements) & CIMug (optimization & implementation support)

  • Standards Development Organizations (SDOs) like IEC TC57 Working Group 14 for the IEC 61968 series of standards

SG-Systems WG


Agenda1

Agenda

  • 3:00 Introductions and Brief Overview of SG-Systems (Greg)

  • 3:15 Requirements Gathering – Use Cases and System Requirements Overview with AMI-Ent example (Joe or Shawn)

  • 3:30 Service Definitions Process with AMI-Ent example (Shawn)

  • 3:45 OpenADE (Steve or Dave)

  • 4:00 OpenADR (Albert or Bruce)

  • 4:15 OpenHAN (Mary or Erich)

  • 4:30 EIM Task Force (Greg)

  • 4:45 General discussion, questions & answers

  • 5:00 Adjourn


Agenda2

Agenda

  • 3:00 Introductions and Brief Overview of SG-Systems (Greg)

  • 3:15 Requirements Gathering – Use Cases and System Requirements Overview with AMI-Ent example (Joe or Shawn)

  • 3:30 Service Definitions Process with AMI-Ent example (Shawn)

  • 3:45 OpenADE (Steve or Dave)

  • 4:00 OpenADR (Albert or Bruce)

  • 4:15 OpenHAN (Mary or Erich)

  • 4:30 EIM Task Force (Greg)

  • 4:45 General discussion, questions & answers

  • 5:00 Adjourn


Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

Scope of HAN SRS in the NIST conceptual model

14


Openhan history

OpenHAN History

2008

2007

2009

2010

August 2008 UtilityAMI 2008 HAN SRS v1.04 released

OpenHAN TF is formed to develop system requirements for the HAN

June 2009

Utility AMI 2008 HAN SRS v1.04 selected as a customer domain standard in the NIST Smart Grid Interoperability Standards Roadmap

October 2009

OpenHAN 2.0 formed to develop the next version of the HAN SRS

Jan – July 2010

OpenHAN 2.0 collaboration effort

August 30, 2010

UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0 ratified and released

15


Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

OpenHAN 2.0 Effort

  • Over 130 individuals representing over 80 companies participated in the development of the HAN SRS v 2.0 over a 10 month period


Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

Documents Reviewed

  • Industry use cases were reviewed to identify any gaps

    • ZigBee+HomePlug SEP MRD

    • SAE J2836/1™ J2836/2™ and J2836/3™ Use Cases

    • NAESB Draft Requirements Specifications for NIST PAP03, PAP04, and PAP09

    • EIS Alliance Customer Domain Use Cases v1.0

    • CEC Requirements Engineering for the Advance Metering Infrastructure and the Home Automation Network (AMI-HAN) interface – February 2008

    • AHAM Smart Grid White Paper

    • DER Contribution to OpenHAN; EPRI/DOE PV/Storage Communication Project

    • Summary of Use Cases: For Demand Response Appliances Interface (EPRI Adapters)

  • February 2010 NISTIR 7628 Smart Grid Cyber Security Strategy and Requirements


  • Ucaiug han srs v2 0

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    Purpose

    Define the system requirements for an open standard Home Area Network system

    Promote open standards-based HANs that are interoperable

    Provide the vendor community with a common set of principles and requirements around which to build products

    Ensure reliable and sustainable HAN platforms

    Support various energy policies in a variety of states, provinces, and countries

    Empower consumers to manage their electricity consumption by giving them the information and control they need to make decisions on their energy use

    18


    Ucaiug han srs v2 01

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    The audience for the HAN SRS include:

    Utilities considering deploying AMI systems that interact with HANs

    Vendors that make AMI systems for Utilities that interact with HANs

    Vendors that make consumer products (e.g. programmable communicating thermostats, energy management systems, load control switches, in-home displays, smart appliances, Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV), distributed energy resources (DER), etc.)

    Service Providers developing smart grid enabled programs for consumers (e.g. demand response, energy management, pre-pay, PEV programs, DER programs, etc.)

    Policy makers looking to understand how Utility AMI deployments that interact with HANs benefit and impact consumers

    Industry alliances and standards organizations

    NIST Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP) activities (e.g. Smart Grid Architectural Committee (SGAC), Cyber Security Working Group (CSWG), Smart Grid Testing and Certification Committee (SGTCC), etc.)

    19


    Ucaiug han srs v2 02

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    Guiding Principles

    Capabilities

    Supports two-way communication between HAN Devices and Service Providers

    Supports load control integration

    The AMI meter provides the HAN with direct access to Consumer-specific usage data

    Provides a growth platform for future products which leverage the HAN and meter data

    Supports three types of messaging: Public Information, Consumer-Specific Information, and Control Signals

    Supports end-use metering and other utility meters

    Supports distributed energy resources

    Assumptions

    Consumer owns the HAN

    HAN devices present additional security considerations

    The HAN is enabled by open and interoperable standards

    20


    Ucaiug han srs v2 03

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    Architectural Considerations

    HAN SRS applies from the edge of the AMI System, where the Energy Services Interface (ESI) resides, to all relevant HAN Devices in the premises

    Energy Services Interface (ESI)

    An interface which enables communication between authorized parties and HAN devices that are registered to it

    There may be more than one ESI in the premise (e.g. Utility ESI, 3rd party ESI)

    Utility ESI – provides interface between the Utility AMI network and HAN devices, including the AMI meter

    Other ESI – provides interface between other communication media (e.g. internet, cell phone, EMS, etc.) and HAN devices registered to it

    21


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    Architectural Considerations, continued

    Commissioning, Registration, Enrollment

    Commissioning is the process by which a HAN device obtains access to a specific physical network and allows the device to be discovered on that network

    Registration is the process by which a Commissioned HAN device is authorized to communicate on a logical network by exchanging security credentials with an ESI

    Enrollment is the process by which a Consumer enrolls a Registered HAN device in a Service Provider program (e.g. demand response, energy management, PEV program, etc.)

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    22


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    23


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    Architectural Considerations, continued

    HAN SRS is agnostic to device ownership

    Some HAN devices may reside on more than one ESI

    HAN SRS is agnostic to electric market structure and is applicable to both integrated utility markets as well as consumer choice electric markets

    There may be multiple communication paths into the HAN (e.g. Utility AMI, internet, cell phone network, EMS, etc.)

    HAN SRS addresses the following special applications

    Plug-in-Electric Vehicle (PEV)

    Energy Management System (EMS)

    Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    24


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    HAN System Requirements

    Application Requirements

    Control applications respond to control signals

    Measurement and Monitor applications provide internal data and status

    Processing applications consume, process, and act on external and internal data

    Human Machine Interface (HMI) provides Consumers a means to provide input into an application or to view information from an application

    Communication Requirements

    Commissioning is the network process of adding a HAN device on the HAN to allow the device to communicate with other devices and involves network scanning, selection, admission, and configuration

    Control of a node involving self-organization, path selection, mitigation

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    25


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    HAN System Requirements, continued

    Security Requirements

    Access Controls and Confidentiality address data protection for data-at-rest and data-in-transit

    Registration is the network process to authenticate and authorize HAN device participation with an ESI and includes initialization, authentication, correlation, authorization, and de-register

    Enrollment is the process by which a Consumer enrolls a HAN device in a Service Provider’s program (e.g. demand response, energy management, pre-pay, PEV programs, distributed generation, pricing, messaging, etc.) and gives certain rights to the Service Provider to communicate with their HAN device

    Integrity preserves the HAN operating environment through resistance and recovery

    Accountability will allow for monitoring malicious activities through audit and non-repudiation

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    26


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    HAN System Requirements, continued

    Performance Requirements

    Ensure applications or other factors do not limit the performance of the system, which is dependent upon availability, reliability, maintainability, scalability, upgradeability, quality and latency

    Operations, Maintenance, and Logistics Requirements

    Manufacturing and Distribution - Vendor’s pre-installation activities including pre-Commissioning settings, application configuration, labeling, support for multiple distribution channels

    Installation – Documentation for the physical placement of the device and support systems

    Manage, Maintain – ensure HAN device diagnostic, management and trouble shooting capabilities including alarming, logging, testing, device reset, and monitoring

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0

    27


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    UCAIug HAN SRS v2.0 is located on the OpenHAN sharepoint:

    http://osgug.ucaiug.org/sgsystems/openhan/default.aspx

    Questions????

    28


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    Appendix

    29


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    This figure shows the type of communication a HAN Device may engage in, which is dependent upon its relationship with the ESI and the Service Provider.

    30


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    In order to provide guidance to service providers and vendors, the OpenHAN Task Force mapped each requirement to functional HAN Devices in tables at the end of each requirement section.

    The tables indicate which requirements the OpenHAN Task Force considered necessary for the Commissioning Process (CP), for the Registration Process (RP), for Security (S), for application functionality (BF), as Optional (O), or if the requirement was Not Applicable (NA) for the function of the device.

    These tables may be used as a template or starting point for Service Providers in their discussions with vendors and in their procurement process.

    Vendors may use these tables as guidance for producing devices and software which enables basic HAN functionality and for providing additional functionality in order to provide competitive differentiation.

    The tables are for reference only and should not limit the needs of Service Providers nor limit vendor innovation.

    Mapping Requirements to Functional Devices

    31


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    Mapping Requirements to Functional Devices

    32


    Agenda3

    Agenda

    • 3:00 Introductions and Brief Overview of SG-Systems (Greg)

    • 3:15 Requirements Gathering – Use Cases and System Requirements Overview with AMI-Ent example (Joe or Shawn)

    • 3:30 Service Definitions Process with AMI-Ent example (Shawn)

    • 3:45 OpenADE (Steve or Dave)

    • 4:00 OpenADR (Albert or Bruce)

    • 4:15 OpenHAN (Mary or Erich)

    • 4:30 EIM Task Force (Greg)

    • 4:45 General discussion, questions & answers

    • 5:00 Adjourn


    The same old approaches won t work

    The Same Old Approaches Won’t Work!

    The Smart Grid is about Smart Data

    Too many moving parts & too much investment at risk - to go on doing “more of the same” IT practices

    Smart Data Requires:

    Planned Enterprise Information Management (EIM)

    Based on an architecture with strong interfaces

    Makes practical use of industry standards

    Decouples projects

    Architecture for incremental deployment over many years

    Master Plan implemented in phases

    Each increment must fit cohesively with previously installed components

    Getting help by leveraging effective user organizations

    Lowers costs and mitigates risks for nominal cost


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    [Source: NIST Interim Roadmap]


    Smart grid interoperability

    Smart Grid Interoperability

    Ability of systems to operate in coordination

    Ability to exchange and use information appropriately

    Requires standardinterfacedefinitions

    Governed by open industry working groups

    Provides Benefits

    Promotes loosely-coupled integration

    Allows incremental functional enhancements

    Creates market for reusable, compatible components

    Only one integration instead of many

    To an open, public, standard interface

    Instead of each proprietary vendor or utility interface


    Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    Requires Integration – LOTS of integration

    Onslaught of new applications and technologies

    AMI, MDMS, HAN, DR, ADE, etc.

    In a complex IT environment

    Many custom systems, legacy technologies

    Typically departmentally controlled – within “silos”

    Need ability to govern, manage, and share resources

    at the Enterprise level and beyond (external services)

    Aging / outsourced systems and IT workforce

    Historically, extremely low R&D expenditures

    Must ramp up capabilities quickly

    Smart Grid Challenges


    It s more than just technical matters

    It’s More Than Just Technical Matters

    Driving Forces

    Restraining Forces

    • Lack of stable industry standard definitions

    • Vendor’s way = lower project costs

    • Vendors pushing for ‘proprietary lock-in’

    • Consultants pushing to be ‘thought leaders’

    • Hours-sold revenue driving System Integrators

    • Internal system experts want to remain experts

    • Project managers striving for control

    • Inertia – why change?

    • Our situation’s unique – standards hinder us

    • Consistent enterprise-wide data

    • One version of the truth

    • Access to data regardless of source

    • Business transformation agility

    • Reduced project implementation costs

    • Reduced maintenance costs

    • Reduced IT risks

    • Availability of external services

    • Scalable business process automation

    • Scalable business activity monitoring

    • Accurate reporting – regulatory, KPIs

    • Mergers and acquisitions

    Status Quo

    For further information, please refer to the article on page 56

    of the January issue of Utility T&D Automation & Engineering:

    http://www.uae-digital.com/uae/200801/


    Architecting for successful integration semantics

    Architecting for Successful Integration Semantics

    Key to Success is Understanding

    What things need central planning

    What things can be left to the local developer/project team

    Need to make active choices regarding:

    System structure and dynamics – cohesion & coupling

    Composition & decomposition

    Data life-cycle ownership across systems:

    Message level (Work Order, Trouble Ticket)

    Object level (Crew, Switch, Asset)

    Master planning is important

    Avoid falling into the trap of ‘Framework Bingo’

    Use IEC 61968-1 IRM as a starting point for service portfolio planning

    Needs to be in the context of Enterprise Information Management (EIM)


    Incremental development

    Incremental Development

    Used to engender a sense of joint ownership for the ultimate success across the organization

    Users:

    Provide feedback so that adjustments can be made impacting business functionality early in the program

    Use part of the ‘to-be’ system, improving their confidence in the programme’s ability to deliver

    Suppliers:

    Early identification of gaps improves ability for satisfactory resolutions within existing budget and schedule

    Significant changes in underlying business requirements can also be managed, without the need for expensive re-work downstream.

    Program staff

    Morale is improved as their confidence grows in their ability to deliver what the users want within the commitments they’ve made

    Leads to greater enthusiasm and a sense of achievement as their productivity increases


    Defining eim gartner

    Defining EIM (Gartner)

    Enterprise Information Management (EIM) is:

    • An organizational commitment to structure, secure and improve the accuracy and integrity of information assets,

    • to solve semantic inconsistencies across all boundaries,

    • and support the technical, operational and business objectives within the organization's enterprise architecture strategy.

  • A commitment to EIM is recognition that information in the enterprise is as important as process (application development) and infrastructure (technology)


  • Sg systems smart grid operational applications integration boot camp overview

    Enterprise Vision & Strategy

    Enterprise Architecture

    Enterprise Business & IT Core Processes

    Enterprise Business & IT Organizations

    Enterprise Infrastructure

    EIM Vision & Strategy

    EIM Governance

    EIM Core Processes

    EIM Organization

    EIM Infrastructure

    Data Quality

    Vision

    Sponsorship

    CSFs & KPIs

    Information Architecture Blueprint Management

    Data Integrity

    Mission

    Data Security & Protection

    Structure

    (Virtual, Hybrid……)

    Stewardship

    Technologies

    (DBMS, Content Mgmt, ETL, EAI, EII, Data Modeling, BI/DW, Collaboration…..)

    Data Lifecycle Management

    Strategy

    Roles & Responsibilities

    Policies, Principles & Tenets

    Data Movement

    Semantics Management

    Goals & Objectives

    Functional Services

    Alignment

    Database Management

    Knowledgebase and Repositories

    Master Data Management

    Value Propositions

    Business Value and Relationship Management

    Structure

    Information Services

    Standards & Best Practices

    Services & Support

    Overall EIM Framework


    Summary points

    Summary Points

    The Smart Grid is about Smart Data

    Too many moving parts & too much investment at risk - to go on doing “more of the same” IT practices

    Smart Data Requires:

    Planned Enterprise Information Management (EIM)

    Based on an architecture with strong interfaces

    Makes practical use of industry standards

    Decouples projects

    Architecture for incremental deployment over many years

    Master Plan implemented in phases

    Each increment must fit cohesively with previously installed components

    Getting help by leveraging effective user organizations

    Lowers costs and mitigates risks for nominal cost


    Agenda4

    Agenda

    • 3:00 Introductions and Brief Overview of SG-Systems (Greg)

    • 3:15 Requirements Gathering – Use Cases and System Requirements Overview with AMI-Ent example (Joe or Shawn)

    • 3:30 Service Definitions Process with AMI-Ent example (Shawn)

    • 3:45 OpenADE (Steve or Dave)

    • 4:00 OpenADR (Albert or Bruce)

    • 4:15 OpenHAN (Mary or Erich)

    • 4:30 EIM Task Force (Greg)

    • 4:45 General discussion, questions & answers

    • 5:00 Adjourn


  • Login