To cite is right
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 21

To Cite Is Right! PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 116 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

To Cite Is Right!. Or…. Avoiding Plagiarism, Pleasing Profs, & Living an Academically Honest Life. What is plagiarism?. Plagiarism is using the words, ideas, research results, formulae, images, or data from another person without giving credit to the originator of those words, ideas,

Download Presentation

To Cite Is Right!

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


To cite is right

ToCiteIsRight!

Or…


Avoiding plagiarism pleasing profs living an academically honest life

Avoiding Plagiarism,Pleasing Profs, &Living an Academically Honest Life


What is plagiarism

What is plagiarism?

Plagiarism is using the words, ideas,

research results, formulae, images,

or data from another person

without giving credit to the originator

of those words, ideas,

research results,

formulae, images

or data


To cite is right

Many students feel that

by using footnotes, endnotes, or citations

their papers will not be as good

as papers that make fewer references to other works.

But this conclusion is just plain wrong…


To cite is right

Paper with citations—no plagiarism

No citations—plagiarized material

In fact, the student who cites sources where appropriate guarantees a better grade than the student who writes a paper without adequately giving credit to the source material!


To cite is right

Why?!?

By providing citations to other works, a writer is showing how he or she is entering into the conversation of a given field, building upon what’s already been said and adding his or her own voice.


When do you need to cite a source

When do you need to cite a source?

Whenever you use the

  • words (written or spoken)

  • ideas

  • formulae

  • research results

  • images or

  • data

    of another person--unless that information is common knowledge


What is common knowledge

What is“common knowledge?”

“Common knowledge” is anything that is considered known by the vast majority of the population—or found in generalized encyclopedias and/or dictionaries. Examples include:

  • Chicago is the largest city in Illinois

  • a2 + b2 = c2

    In those examples, you would not be expected to cite the census or Pythagoras.


Example of when you would be expected to cite a source

Example of when you would be expected to cite a source:

When you’re including information that isn’t common knowledge, you would want to cite it:

William Butler Ogden, the first mayor of Chicago, designed the first swing bridge over the Chicago River (ByCityLight, 2).

The complete reference for this source would then be found at the end of the paper in the “Works Cited” page:

“Chicago, Illinois.” ByCityLights.com. 31 October 2007 <bycitylights.com/cities/us-il-chicago-history.php>.


Another example

As Julius Smith notes, “[i]n 2D, the Pythagorean Theorem says that when x and y are orthogonal… then we have:

║x+y║2 =║x║2 + ║y║2 (x┴y).”(Fourier Theorems)

The “Works Cited” page would include this citation:

Smith, J.O. "Fourier Theorems for the DFT" in Mathematics of the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) with Audio Applications, 2nd ed. 2007.31 October 2007 <http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Fourier_Theorems_DFT.html>.

Another example:


To cite is right

It’s fairly obvious that copying directly from a source without using quotation marks and not providing a citation is plagiarism.What about when we copy from a source and change a few words (i.e., paraphrase) without indicating its originator?

This is also plagiarism.


Why is paraphrasing plagiarism

Why is paraphrasing plagiarism?

If you steal your roommate’s pillow and put it in your pillowcase, it is still your roommate’s pillow, right?

It’s no different if you

take an idea from

someone else—it’s still

their idea, not yours.


To cite is right

ToCiteIsRight!


Thought problems

Thought problems

Properly using citations in a research paper ensures a better grade than not using any citations.T / F

WHY?


To cite is right

As long as you have a Bibliography/Works Cited/Works Consulted page, you will not need to use footnotes or endnotes or parenthetical references.T / F

WHY?


To cite is right

The above statement was taken from a scholarly journal.

If a student were to include the sentence on the right in a research paper, would it be considered plagiarism?

Students who use alcohol or marijuana are more likely to use tobacco.

Plagiarism or not?

“Tobacco use was significantly higher among white students (P<.001), users of other substances (alcohol and marijuana) (P<.001), and students whose priorities were social rather than educational or athletic (P<.05).” (Rigotti, Lee and Wechsler, 699)


To cite is right

Using the same sentence, above, determine whether the student’s statement on the right would be considered plagiarism or not.

Athletes are not as likely to use tobacco as those students who attend college with the aim of meeting friends.

Plagiarism or not?

“Tobacco use was significantly higher among white students (P<.001), users of other substances (alcohol and marijuana) (P<.001), and students whose priorities were social rather than educational or athletic (P<.05).” (Rigotti, Lee and Wechsler, 699)


To cite is right

ToCiteIsRight!


When in doubt

When in doubt…

  • Ask your professor!

  • Ask at the Writing Center!

  • Ask a librarian!

    We all want to see you succeed!


Works consulted

Works Consulted

“Chicago, Illinois.” ByCityLights.com. 31 October 2007 <bycitylights.com/cities/us-il-chicago-history.php>.

“Defining and Avoiding Plagiarism: The WPA Statement on Best Practices.” Online posting. 22 October 2007 <http://wpacouncil.org/positions/plagiarism.html>.

Moulton, Janice and George Robinson. “Plagiarism” Encyclopedia of Ethics, 2nd ed. New York: Routledge, 2002.

“Plagiarism.” Online posting. 25 October 2007 <http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/plagiarism.html>

Rigotti, Nancy A., Jae Eun Lee, and Henry Wechsler. “U.S. College Students’ Use of Tobacco Products.” Journal of the American Medical Association 284 (2000): 699-705.

Stepchyshyn, Vera and Robert S.Nelson. Library Plagiarism Policies: CLIP Note #37. Chicago: American Library Assocation, 2007.

Smith, J.O. "Fourier Theorems for the DFT" in Mathematics of the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) with Audio Applications, 2nd ed. 2007.31 October 2007 <http://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/mdft/Fourier_Theorems_DFT.html>.


To cite is right

Created by:

Jean MacDonald

Ames Library


  • Login