Embedded professional development a district s proactive model with a contracting agency
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Embedded Professional Development: A District's Proactive Model with a Contracting Agency. WASA/OSPI Special Education Workshop 2013 Ken Heikkila , Ed.D . Riverview School District Tom Powers, Ph.D. Brooks Powers Group Allison Brooks, Ph.D. Brooks Powers Group

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Embedded Professional Development: A District's Proactive Model with a Contracting Agency

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Embedded professional development a district s proactive model with a contracting agency

Embedded Professional Development: A District's Proactive Model with a Contracting Agency

WASA/OSPI Special Education Workshop 2013

Ken Heikkila, Ed.D. Riverview School District

Tom Powers, Ph.D. Brooks Powers Group

Allison Brooks, Ph.D. Brooks Powers Group

Kire Dassel, M.Ed. Brooks Powers Group


Investing time and energy

Investing time and energy….

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Investing in teaching improvement

Investing in teaching improvement:

“…we need to invest in activities that have the characteristics that research shows foster improvements in teaching. A major challenge to providing this type of high-quality professional development is cost. Schools and districts understandably feel a responsibility to reach large numbers of teachers. But a focus on breadth in terms of number of teachers served comes at the expense of depth in terms of quality of experience. …funds should be focused on providing high-quality professional experiences.” P. 937 NOTE: emphasis added

Reference: Garet, Porter, Desimone, Birman, Yoon (2001), “What Makes Professional Development Effective?” American Educational Research Journal.

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Job embedded pd

Job-embedded PD

“Job-embedded professional development (JEPD) refers to teacher learning that is grounded in day-to-day teaching practice and is designed to enhance teachers’ content-specific instructional practices with the intent of improving student learning.” (p. 2)

Reference: Croft, Coggshall, Dolan, Powers, and Killion. Job-Embedded Professional Development: What it is, Who is Responsible, and How to Get it Done Well, published by National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality, Mid-Atlantic Comprehensive Center, and National Staff Development Council.

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Embedded professional development a district s proactive model with a contracting agency

JEPD

  • School/classroom based

  • Integrated into school day

  • Focused on authentic and immediate problems

  • Ongoing process

  • Active teacher involvement

  • Cooperative practice

  • Inquiry-based work

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Objective of workshop

Objective of workshop:

Share our story of a professional development model that has:

Benefits for student learning (qualitative data)

Reduced costs over time (quantitative data)

Provides for an ongoing, proactive approach (qualitative data)

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Participants will

Participants will:

Identify concepts/ systems that can be applied in their context to strengthen professional development efforts

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Riverview school district

Riverview School District

Location: Carnation and Duvall area (east King Co.)

Community: A transformed community previously agricultural/logging to a family community with many parents employed in technology

Students:

  • Approximately 3200 students (headcount)

  • District free/reduced lunch at 19.1% (May 2012)

  • 82% white; 10% Hispanic; 3% Asian; 3% Mixed race (May 2012)

  • 2% English language learners (May 2012)

  • 10.1% special education identified (May 2012)

  • One high school; one middle school; 3 elementary; 2 other

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Special education services

Special Education Services

Inclusive: All students are served in their home school (regardless of disability)

Realistic: Understanding that no one (special education) teacher has all the skills and knowledge to work effectively with all disabilities or learning needs

Collaborative: Moving to break down “silos” of practice, i.e. goal to work more collaboratively between general and special education staff

Data Driven: Ongoing process to improve practice

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Vision for sp ed services

Vision for Sp Ed Services

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Who we are

Who we are:

  • Collaborative team of 12 individuals with complementary skills

    • Psychologists

    • Teachers

    • Mental health counselors

    • Behavior specialists

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


What we do we work with really challenging kids and their sometimes challenging adults

What we do:We work with really challenging kids (and their sometimes challenging adults)

Individual Services

School Services

Independent evaluations

FBAs, BIPs and direct behavior support

In-situ teacher training

Professional consultation and collaboration

  • Neuropsychological assessment

  • Individual counseling

  • In-home behavior support/ parent coaching

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Riverview s partnership with bpg

Riverview’s Partnership with BPG

The benefits of networking with other directors/districts—positive info about Brooks Powers Group

A chance encounter that made decision making fast and decisive

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


What drew us to riverview

What drew us to Riverview

Receptive to our “can we talk” inquiry

Acted with integrity and even generosity toward a parent hostile to school district

Committed to teaching staff skills and moving them toward independence from us

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Five years later

Five Years Later…

Sharing data on:

Benefits for student learning (qualitative data)

Reduced costs over time (quantitative data)

Provision for an ongoing, proactive approach (qualitative data)

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Benefits to student learning

Benefits to Student Learning

Based on these steps:

  • Developing relationships/building trust

  • Observing and analyzing

  • Acting when the time is right: modeling, coaching, collaborating, etc…

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Stories highlighting student benefits

Stories Highlighting Student Benefits

Student AR (told by Ken)

Teacher JL (told by Kire)

Teacher JT (told by Kire)

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Annual cost of services

Annual Cost of Services

Start of pro-active model

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Services provided

Services Provided

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Staff professional development

Staff Professional Development

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Costs by service

Costs by Service

Average Annual cost = $70,071

Average cost by student:

Year 1: $15,113

Year 5: $2,407

Average cost by staff

Year 1: $3,239

Year 5: $923

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Proactive approach

Proactive Approach

Baseline (pre-BPG)—told by Ken

Implementing change (DD or AR)—told by Ken

Systems approach—told by Kire

Model partnership example (RJ at CE)—told by Kire

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Reflection

Reflection

Concepts/systems than can be applied in other districts:

Leadership/vision

Collaborative team of experts

Relationship building

Collaborative problem solving

Real time/real situations/in the setting

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


Questions dialogue

Questions/Dialogue

WASA/OSPI Sp ED 2013


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