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Building a program based on research, field experience and evidence based behavior change models/theories. Susan Bergson Michael Robinson Jack Carrel Based on Presentation by: B.D. Hayes, DSW, MPH, MSW- Morehouse School of Medicine. Learning Objectives.

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Building a program based on research, field experience and evidence based behavior change models/theories

Susan BergsonMichael RobinsonJack CarrelBased on Presentation by: B.D. Hayes, DSW, MPH, MSW- Morehouse School of Medicine


Learning Objectives

  • To provide a model for developing your proposal ideas based on research, field experience and evidence based behavior change models/theories

  • To review winning grant writing tips

  • To identify strategies for mutually beneficial partnering/collaborations

  • To increase funding for a variety of projects


A successful grant proposal is

one that is well-prepared,

thoughtfully planned and

concisely packaged

…………….………….CFDA


Research and Write first

Fund Second


The Three Essential Laws of Successful Proposal Development and Grant Writing

  • Do your homework

  • Follow instructions

  • Use Common Sense


General Tips and Comments

  • Take sufficient time to prepare a good abstract, LOI, or a concept paper

  • Avoid the use of jargon and acronyms

  • Always include a budget and budget justification

  • Be careful when/where you cut and paste: assure uniformity of font size and type

  • ALWAYS use a reader and get editorial assistance


Traits of a Successful Grant Getter

  • Research skills

  • Salesmanship skills

  • Communication skills

  • Ingenuity skills

  • Administrative skills

  • Human relations

  • Persistence, dedication, patience

  • Ability to work hard

  • Political awareness and action

  • Integrity


Step 1: Research

  • Before writing up a proposal, look at the research or the evidence base

    • PubMed

    • Google Scholar

  • Make sure to reference research (cite articles) in your background or needs statement

  • Use what already exists:

    • Statewide Coordinated Statement of Need and Comprehensive Plan

    • HIV/AIDS Quarterly and Annual Reports

    • New report from the Southern AIDS Coalition


Step 2: Field Experience

  • What makes you think that it will work in the context in which you work and the population you will focus on?

  • Conduct focus groups and/or key informant interviews to understand why and how intervention will work

  • If changes to intervention need to be made to fit your population of interest, what are they?

  • Check out article- Cultural adaptation in translational research: field experiences. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15933334


Step 3: Understanding Behavior Change Theory


Global Causes of Death

Step 3: Understanding Behavior Change Theory

Injuries

Communicable diseases, maternal and perinatal conditions, and nutritional deficiencies

Noncommunicable diseases

Source: WHO, World Health Report 2000—Health Systems: Improving Performance (Geneva: WHO, 2000).


Behavior change reduces risky behaviors


Health Promotion Means Changing Behavior at Multiple Levels

AIndividual: knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, personality 

BInterpersonal: family, friends, peers 

CCommunity: social networks, standards, norms 

DInstitutional: rules, policies, informal structures

EPublic Policy: local policies related to healthy practices

Source: Adapted from National Cancer Institute, Theory at a Glance: A Guide for Health Promotion (2003), available online at http://cancer.gov.


Stages of Change Model

  • Changing one’s behavior is a process, not an event

  • Individuals at different levels of change

  • Gear interventions to level of change

Source: James O. Prochaska et al., “In Search of How People Change: Application to Addictive Behaviors,” American Psychologist 47, no. 9 (1992): 1102-14.


Stages of Change Model (cont.)

Precontemplation

Maintenance

Contemplation

Action

Decision


Example Combating HIV/AIDS in Uganda

  • Political support, multisectoral response

  • Decentralized behavior change campaigns

  • Focus on women and youth, stigma and discrimination

  • Mobilization of religious leaders

  • Confidential voluntary counseling and testing

  • Social marketing of condoms

  • Control and prevention of STIs

Source: Edward C. Green, Rethinking AIDS Prevention: Learning from Successes in Developing Countries (Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2003).


SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS

  • Direct, concise, compelling, convincing, capable and resourceful

  • Addresses a significant/important problem

  • Explicit goals, measurable objectives

  • Comprehensive but succinct background review

  • Methodology fits problem

  • Appropriate funding mechanism


Unsuccessful Applications

  • Lack of knowledge about relevant literature

  • Questionable reasoning in research design

  • Lack of demonstrated experience in selected methodology (lacks detail)

  • Format issues

  • Over-ambitious

  • Failure to follow directions

  • Lack of new or original ideas

  • Diffuse, superficial, or unfocused research

  • Lacks clearly stated hypothesis and rationale

  • Lack of an overall research goal; uncertainty about future directions


Developing Your Idea(s)

  • Needs Assessment

    • Evidence of problem

    • Local, county, state, national

  • Capability Assessment

    • Organizational

    • People

    • Past and present history

    • Resources (funds, expertise, etc.)


Grant Writing Process

  • Begins with a good idea

  • Review the components of a successful grant

  • Apply the model

  • Evaluate and discuss the plan

  • Literature review

  • Analysis of current research/activity in the field

  • Develop team


The Task You Face

  • Clearly Identify the Need

    • Make sure the needs are those of the target population

  • Define the Solution

    • Use a Problem/Needs approach

  • Carefully Design the Project

    • How a problem is defined often determines an approach to develop a solution


Basic Components

  • Project Methods or Design

  • Project Evaluation

  • Project Budget

  • Future Funding

  • The Proposal Summary

  • Introduction

  • Problem Statement (or Needs Assessment)

  • Project Objectives


General Tips and Comments

  • Take sufficient time to prepare a good abstract, LOI, or a concept paper

  • Avoid the use of jargon and acronyms

  • Always include s budget and budget justification

  • Be careful when/where you cut and paste: assure uniformity of font size and type

  • ALWAYS use a reader and get editorial assistance


Questions?

  • Read the directions!

  • As you are writing the LOI, please feel free to send Michael Robinson questions: [email protected]

  • Get two other people who are not involved with the proposal development to read your document

  • The Louisiana Community AIDS Partnership is available to help with technical assistance on all of your grant applications if you need us.


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