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Center for. C C F. W. Child and Family Well-being. UW Early Learning Conference: Parenting to Promote Child Well-being. Department of Psychology. UW Early Learning Conference: Parenting to Promote Child Well-being. Many sources of parenting knowledge and tools

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UW Early Learning Conference: Parenting to Promote Child Well-being

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Center for

CCF

W

Child and Family Well-being

UW Early Learning Conference:Parenting to Promote Child Well-being

Department of Psychology


UW Early Learning Conference:Parenting to Promote Child Well-being

  • Many sources of parenting knowledge and tools

    • Own wisdom or intuitions about your children

    • Respected and valued elders

    • Church and community leaders

    • Trusted experts

    • Oprah

  • Research provides objective and unbiased information

  • Incorporate research-based knowledge in parenting tool-kit


UW Early Learning Conference:Parenting to Promote Child Well-being

  • 10:00 Nature and Nurturing: Parenting with Children's Temperament Styles in Mind - Liliana Lengua

  • 11:00 Strategies That Work: How to Promote Children's Best Behavior and Effectively Manage the Less-than-Best - Suzanne Kerns

  • 12:00 Lunch

  • 1:00 Emotion Coaching Can Facilitate Children's Well-being - Lynn Fainsilber-Katz

  • 2:00 Mindfulness: Cultivating Greater Awareness of Self, Children and Our Relationship with Them - Rebecca Cortes & Yaffa Maritz

  • 3:00 Mastery Approach to Parenting in Sports: Developing Champions in Sports and in Life - Frank Smoll

  • 4:00 Networking and Questions


Nature & Nurturing: Parenting with Your Child’s Temperament Style in Mind

Liliana J. Lengua

Center for Child & Family Well-being

Department of Psychology

University of Washington


  • What is Temperament?

  • Children respond differently to parenting.

  • Parents respond differently to their children.

  • What works best with which kids?


Child Temperament

  • Individual differences in emotional reactions & regulation of emotions

  • Physiologically based

  • Inherited (genetically based)

  • Formed by experience

  • Present at birth, but changes over time


Child Temperament

  • Models that are very broad:

    • “Difficult Temperament”

    • “Spirited Child”

  • Models that are very specific:

    • Inhibited/uninhibited

    • Sensation seeking


Physiological Model of Temperament


Autonomic Nervous System

Parasympathetic System

Sympathetic System

Threat or Challenge

Nonemergency

Recover, Rest & Digest

Fight or Flight


Autonomic Nervous System

Sympathetic System

Parasympathetic System

Threat or Challenge

Nonemergency

Fight or Flight

Recover, Rest & Digest

Behavioral Activation

System:

Approach

Desire

Frustration

Behavioral Inhibition

System:

Withdrawal

Self-protection

Fear

BAS

BIS


BAS>BIS

caution

assess

attack

excitement

seek

guidance

fun

threat

ignore

instructions

new

friends

strangers

careful

charge

thrill

rejection

plan

opportunity


BAS<BIS

caution

assess

attack

excitement

seek

guidance

fun

threat

ignore

instructions

new

friends

strangers

careful

charge

thrill

rejection

plan

opportunity


BAS>BIS vs. BAS<BIS

  • Approach

  • Reward oriented

  • Impulsive

    “Go, pursue, obtain.”

  • Pleasure, delight, hope

  • Easily frustrated & angry

  • Inhibited

  • Threat oriented

  • Cautious,Withdrawn

    “Stop, look, listen, & be careful.”

  • Easily frightened or anxious


Physiological Model of Temperament

  • Individual differences in:

    • Reactivity

      • Frustration/anger (BAS)

      • Impulsivity (BAS)

      • Fearfulness (BIS)

    • Regulation

      • Ability to recover

      • Effortful Control


Effortful Control


Easily Frustrated Children (BAS)

“It’s time to leave.”

“No! I don’t want to.”

“Please don’t make this difficult!”

“You’re so mean!”

“Why is it always like this with you!”


Frustrated, Angry (BAS)

  • Children respond differently to parents:

    • Quick to anger, argumentative.

    • More oppositional and aggressive.

  • Parents respond differently to children:

    • Increasing harsh, negative & frustrated responses.

    • Decreasing consistency and reasoning.

  • What works best?

    • Build positive, warm relationship.

    • Be calm! Don’t engage with anger.

    • Be consistent: predictability helps.


Impulsive Children (BAS)

“Hey, the rule is you have to stay on the path!”

“Let’s stick together & stay on the path.”

“Come back here! I asked you to stay close!”

“That’s not safe. You need to stop now!”


Impulsive Children (BAS)


Impulsive (BAS)

  • Children respond differently to parents:

    • Don’t seem to remember or learn from previous

      experience; don’t seem to listen.

    • More likely to be “disobedient” or get in problem situations.

    • More responsive to positive, reward than negative, punishment.

  • Parents respond differently to children:

    • Increasing harsh, negative & frustrated responses.

    • Decreasing consistency and reasoning.

  • What works best?

    • Build positive, warm relationship.

    • Be calm but quick! Have a cue or code word for “stop”.

    • Be consistent: predictability helps.


Fearful, Inhibited Children (BIS)

“Do you want to join the party or stay here with me?”

“You’re in! Get in there now! No backing out and no crying!”


Fearful, Inhibited (BIS)

  • Children respond differently to parents:

    • Concerned about parents displeasure or anger.

    • More compliant and cooperative

      • Unless they are afraid or nervous…

      • Until they are pre-adolescents/adolesents…

  • Parents respond differently to children:

    • More sensitive, responsive, and warm

    • Over-protectiveness or solicitousness sustains child fear

    • Harsh or insensitive parenting increases anxiety, depression, and oppositional behaviors

  • What works best?

    • Balance of sensitivity and encouraging independence.

    • Gentle encouragement of feared activities or contexts.


Summary

  • Temperament is individual differences in reactivity & self-regulation:

    • Fearful/anxious

    • Frustration

    • Impulsivity

    • Recovery

    • Effortful Control

  • Physiologically based

  • Inherited

  • Formed by experience


Summary

  • Easily frustrated and impulsive children:

    • Build positive relationship

    • Be consistent

    • Clear expectations and contingencies

    • Parents - Stop, calm down and think!

  • Fearful, anxious children:

    • Balance warmth and sensitivity with encouraging independence


Acknowledgements

Colleagues:

Mark Greenberg, Phil Fisher,

Craig Colder

Graduate Students:

Nicki Bush, Lara Embry, Stephanie Fengler, Cara

Kiff, Erika Kovacs, Anna Long,

Lyndsey Moran, Connie Meza, Anika Trancik, Maureen Zalewski

Funding:

NICHD (R01 HD054465), NIMH (R29 MH57703), UW Center for Mind, Brain & Learning-Talaris Research Institute, & the UW Royalties Research Fund

“Temperament Lab” at Home


Questions from the audience?


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