Manual handling safe lifting
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Manual Handling & Safe Lifting. For Tulane University Departmental Safety Representatives (DSRs) May2011. Training Content. Introduction Overall Objective Manual Handling Back Stats and Facts Why Back Injury Occurs Common Causes of Injury Prevention Proper Lifting Techniques

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Manual handling safe lifting

Manual Handling & Safe Lifting

For Tulane University Departmental Safety Representatives (DSRs)

May2011

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Training content

Training Content

  • Introduction

  • Overall Objective

  • Manual Handling

  • Back Stats and Facts

  • Why Back Injury Occurs

  • Common Causes of Injury

  • Prevention

  • Proper Lifting Techniques

  • Body Management

  • Conclusions

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Overall objectives

Overall Objectives

  • Provide sufficient understanding and knowledge of manual handling, the risks involved and the control measures available.

  • Reduce lost working days through injury.

  • Protect the back, one of the most important parts of the body.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling

Lifting

Carrying

Manual Handling

Manual handling refers to any activity requiring a person to use any part of their muscular or skeletal system in their interactions with their work environment.

  • It includes the following activities:

    • Lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving

Pushing

Pulling

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling1

Manual Handling

  • Several major body parts, the hands, wrists, shoulders, and neck, are affected by force, awkward posture, and repetitive motion due to manual handing operations.

  • The one part of the body that is of particular interest for this training and is particularly vulnerable to manual handling injuries isthe back.To prevent back injuries lets get a better understanding of it, how it’s affected, and factors that may contribute to its injury.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Back stats

Back Stats

  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics sprains and strains was the leading nature of injury and illness in every major industry sector in 2005.

  • The part of the body most affected by work incidents was the trunk, including the shoulder and back. This accounted for 35 percent of all cases.

  • While overall injuries to the trunk decreased by 4 percent from 2004, of the injuries or illnesses to the trunk, those involving the back accounted for 63 percent.

    Reference: http://stats.bls.gov/news.release/archives/osh2_11172006.pdf

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Back facts

Back Facts

Back injuries cause loss of work and cost billions of dollars per year

According to the Centers for Disease Control, low back pain occurs with the same frequency in people with sedentary occupations as those in heavy labor occupations.

The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health has established that while an individual may experience back problems due to lifting, there are non-occupational factors, including the individual’s physical fitness level, strength, and posture are oftentimes associated with back injuries.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

  • The spine’s vertebrae are held together by ligaments.

  • Muscles are attached to the vertebrae by bands of tissue called tendons.

  • Between each vertebra is a cushion known as a disc.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

  • The lower part of the back holds most of the body’s weight.

  • Every time you bend over, lift a heavy object, or sit leaning forward, you put stress on your spine.

  • Over time, the discs between your vertebrae can start to wear out and become damaged.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

The forces involved:

  • Every time you bend or lean over to pick something up, you put tremendous pressure on your lower back…

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

The forces involved:

  • Think of your back as a lever. With the fulcrum in the center of the lever, how many pounds would it take to lift a 10 pound object?

5 pounds10 pounds15 pounds

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

You’re right!

It takes 10 pounds of pressure to lift a 10 pound object.

Will it take more or less force to lift the same 10 pound object with the fulcrum shifted to one side?

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

You’re right!

With the fulcrum shifted away from the object, it takes more force to lift the object.

The human back operates on a 10:1 ratio, with the waist acting as the fulcrum.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

When you add in the 105 pounds of the average human upper torso, lifting a 10 pound object puts 1,150 pounds of pressure on the human back.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

If you were 25 pounds overweight, it would put an additional 250 pounds of pressure on your back every time you bend over.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Why Back Injury Occurs

Now it’s easy to see how repetitive bending and lifting can quickly cause back problems.

Even leaning forward while sitting at a desk or table can eventually cause damage and pain.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury

Common Causes of Injury

Twisting at the waist while lifting or

holding a heavy load…

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury1

Common Causes of Injury

Reaching and lifting over your head,

across large area, or over . . . .

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury2

Common Causes of Injury

Lifting or carrying objects with awkward

or odd shapes….

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury3

Common Causes of Injury

Working in awkward, uncomfortable

positions…

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury4

Common Causes of Injury

Sitting or standing for prolonged periods of time…

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury5

Common Causes of Injury

Heavy lifting and repetitive motion activities…

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury6

Common Causes of Injury

Stress -

Tense muscles are more susceptible to strains and spasms.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injury7

Common Causes of Injury

“Overdoing It”

Don't be afraid to say, "This is too heavy for me to lift alone." It's important to recognize your own physical limitations and abilities. Many people have injured their backs because they were afraid to ask for help.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Common causes of injuries

Common Causes of Injuries

Poor physical condition

Your stomach muscles provide a lot of the support needed by your back. If you have weak, flabby stomach muscles, and are overweight your back may not get all the support it needs, especially when you're lifting or carrying heavy objects. Good physical condition in general is important for preventing strains, sprains, and other injuries.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Prevention

Prevention

The best way to prevent back injuries is to develop habits that reduce the strain placed on the back.

There are some basic things you can do to help.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Prevention1

Prevention

  • Avoid lifting and bending whenever you can.

Place objects up off the floor.

That way you won’t have to reach down to pick them up again.

Raise / lower shelves.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Prevention2

Prevention

The best zone for lifting is between your shoulders and your waist.

Put heavier objects on shelves at waist level, lighter objects on lower or higher shelves.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Prevention3

Prevention

Use carts and dollies to move objects, instead of carrying them yourself.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Assess the situation before lifting and carrying a heavy object.

How far will you have to carry the load?

Is the way clear of clutter, cords, slippery areas, overhangs, stairs, curbs, or uneven surfaces?

Will there be doors that are closed? Ask someone to hold a door open or place a wedge under the door to hold it open.

Once you get the load up, will you be able to see over the load, or will the load block your view?

Can the load be disassembled, carried in pieces, then reassembled?

Proper Lifting

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Proper lifting

Proper Lifting

  • Take a few moments to "size up the load." Test the weight by lifting a corner of the object. If it is too heavy or if the object is an odd shape, STOP!

    • Start the lift by putting your feet close to the object. Get a firm footing.

    • Center your body over your feet.

    • Bending your knees, keep your back straight or slightly arched, while letting your legs to do the lifting, not your back.

    • Grasp the load securely with your hands, and pull the load close to you.

    • Smoothly lift straight up. Avoid twisting.

Follow these steps when lifting:

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Proper lifting1

Proper Lifting

As you carry the load:

  • Keep your back straight or slightly arched.

  • Walk slowly and surely.

  • Use your feet to change directions. Never twist your back.

  • Avoid leaning over.

  • Avoid lifting a load over your head.

  • If you become tired, set the load down, and rest for a few moments.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Setting the load down

Setting the Load Down

Setting the load down is the reverse of lifting.

  • Position yourself where you want to set the load.

  • Squat down. Let your legs to do the work, not your back.

  • Avoid twisting

  • Once the load is where you want it, release your grip. Never release your grip on a load until it is secure. You don't want to drop a load on your foot. Or, if someone is helping you, dropping a load unexpectedly can injure the other person.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Body management

Body Management

It's important to know your body's limitations, and it's important to be aware of your body position at all times.

Learn to recognize those situations where your back is most a risk: bending, lifting, reaching, twisting, etc.

Then take measures to avoid an injury.

Management tips include: Stretch first, slow down, rest your back, sleep on a firm mattress, get in shape.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Remember

Remember

  • Practicing good lifting technique does not enable you to lift more than you could before. It means that, whatever your individual capabilities, your chances of injury are reduced.

  • Good technique is just one of a number of control measures, within the hierarchy of control, that the employer has to put in place to reduce manual handling risks.

  • Management of the body can help to reduce the amount of strain to the back.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


In conclusion

In Conclusion

Manual handling activities which include pulling, pushing, carrying, and lifting can lead to injury of the body, especially the back. Thus,

  • Know your own limits.

  • Avoid lifting if possible or use devices to assist with lifting.

  • Practice safe lifting techniques-put training into action at work as well as home. Prevent injury by developing habits that reduce the strain placed on the back.

  • Manage and maintain a fit, healthy body.

  • Immediately report any injury to your supervisor.

Tulane University - Office of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)


Manual handling safe lifting

Tulane UniversityOffice of Environmental Health & Safety (OEHS)http://tulane.edu/oehs Kim Chapital, Manager, Occupational Health(504) 988-2870 / [email protected]

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If unable to proceed to quiz, type the link below into your browser https://pandora.tcs.tulane.edu/ehs/enterssn.cfm?testnum=71


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