7 Secrets of Graphic Organizers
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7 Secrets of Graphic Organizers  James Lerman Coordinator NJ Consortium for Middle Schools Kean University :: Union, NJ [email protected] Getting to the point. How do you make a peanut butter sandwich?.

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7 Secrets of Graphic OrganizersJames LermanCoordinatorNJ Consortium for Middle SchoolsKean University :: Union, [email protected]


Getting to

the point


How do you make a peanut butter sandwich?


1. If you needed to save money in making the sandwich, what are some ways you could do it?

2. If you needed to save time in making the sandwich, what are some ways you could do it?

3. What if you were having a party and had to make 50 peanut butter sandwiches. Would you follow the same process? Why?

4. What if you were in a contest to make the best tasting peanut butter sandwich. Would you follow the same process? Why?

5. Suppose you were running a restaurant and had to decide how much to charge a customer for a peanut butter sandwich. What’s the most effective way to figure this out?

6. What’s the best way to make a peanut butter sandwich?


Flow Chart


Why Are Graphic Organizers Important?


Not to scale, for trend analysis only

Source: J. Lerman from state and national test data


GOs lead toward more self-managed learning


GOs lead toward more self-managed learning


GOs lead toward more self-managed learning


GOs lead toward more self-managed learning


Double Bubble Diagram

Crutch

Hammer


A tool

Not a crutch

Graphic Organizers


Here comes

the point!


The Goal of Graphic Organizers

The goal of using graphic

organizers is to develop

independent use by students.

Unless mastery of independent use

is achieved, graphic organizers

can become a crutch for the

student, rather than a tool.


A tool

Not a crutch

Graphic Organizers


(And now for a humorous interlude…)

“Please don’t give him any ideas.”

Source: The New Yorker


This is the

heavy lifting…

The Top Ten

Graphic Organizers


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix*

  • Double Bubble Map

  • Flow Map

  • Multi-Flow Map

  • Tree Map

  • Three-Circle Venn Diagram*

*Not part of David Hyerle’s Thinking Maps


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map


Brace Map :: for identifying part-whole relationships


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map


Bridge Map :: for seeing analogies

Remember to identify (name) the Relating Factor


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map


Bubble Map :: for describing and analyzing


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map


Circle Map :: for defining in context

Your topic… in the center

What you know… in the doughnut

How you came to know it … in the box


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix


Comparison Matrix :: for comparing multiple items across multiple criteria


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix

  • Double Bubble Map


Similarities

Differences

Differences

Double Bubble Map :: for comparing and contrasting


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix

  • Double Bubble Map

  • Flow Map


Flow Map :: for sequencing and ordering


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix

  • Double Bubble Map

  • Flow Map

  • Multi-Flow Map


Multi-Flow Map :: for analyzing cause and effect


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix

  • Double Bubble Map

  • Flow Map

  • Multi-Flow Map

  • Tree Map


Tree Map :: for classifying and grouping


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix

  • Double Bubble Map

  • Flow Map

  • Multi-Flow Map

  • Tree Map

  • Three-Circle Venn Diagram


Three-Circle Venn Diagram :: for analyzing multiple interactions


The Top Ten GOs

  • Brace Map

  • Bridge Map

  • Bubble Map

  • Circle Map

  • Comparison Matrix*

  • Double Bubble Map

  • Flow Map

  • Multi-Flow Map

  • Tree Map

  • Three-Circle Venn Diagram*

*Not part of David Hyerle’s Thinking Maps


“Have some respect for my learning style.”

(Another humorous interlude)

Source: The New Yorker


Now for a little more

heavy lifting…

The 9 Marzano Strategies


The 9 Marzano Strategies

  • Identifying similarities and differences


The 9 Marzano Strategies

  • Identifying similarities and differences

  • Summarizing and taking notes


The 9 Marzano Strategies

  • Identifying similarities and differences

  • Summarizing and taking notes

  • Reinforcing effort & giving recognition


The 9 Marzano Strategies

  • Identifying similarities and differences

  • Summarizing and taking notes

  • Reinforcing effort & giving recognition

  • Homework and practice


The 9 Marzano Strategies

  • Identifying similarities and differences

  • Summarizing and taking notes

  • Reinforcing effort & giving recognition

  • Homework and practice

  • Nonlinguistic representations


The 9 Marzano Strategies

6. Cooperative learning


The 9 Marzano Strategies

6. Cooperative learning

7. Setting objectives & providing feedback


The 9 Marzano Strategies

6. Cooperative learning

7. Setting objectives & providing feedback

8. Generating & testing hypotheses


The 9 Marzano Strategies

6. Cooperative learning

7. Setting objectives & providing feedback

8. Generating & testing hypotheses

9. Cues, questions, & advance organizers


Let’s take another rest for a second…


Matching

GOs to the Marzano Strategies


That’s all very nice…

But how does it help ME?


This is what GOs

help learners to do…


  • Plan approaches to a task


  • 1. Plan approaches to a task

  • Organize a sequence of actions or series of data points


  • 1. Plan approaches to a task

  • 2. Organize a sequence of actions or series of data points

  • Hold action sequences in mind until executed


  • 1. Plan approaches to a task

  • 2. Organize a sequence of actions or series of data points

  • 3. Hold action sequences in mind until executed

  • Inhibit actions irrelevant to the task at hand


  • Decide what to attend to and what to do


  • Decide what to attend to and what to do

  • Make shifts when needed


  • Decide what to attend to and what to do

    6. Make shifts when needed

  • Monitor and evaluate their own actions


  • Decide what to attend to and what to do

    6. Make shifts when needed

    7. Monitor and evaluate their own actions

    8. Adjust emotions in response to perceived success or failure


And to summarize…


Let’s try it out…

(What kind of GO is this?)


Question Creation Chart (Q-Chart)


How can GOs help teachers?


GOs lead toward more self-managed learning


We’re done!

Let’s just do a quick summary…


A tool

Not a crutch

Graphic Organizers


The Goal of Graphic Organizers

The goal of using graphic

organizers is to develop

independent use by students.

Unless mastery of independent use

is achieved, graphic organizers

can become a crutch for the

student, rather than a tool.


Matching

GOs to the Marzano Strategies


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