Universal design in student affairs engagement retention
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Universal Design in Student Affairs: Engagement & Retention. AHEAD 2011 Conference Session #1.9 Wednesday, July 13, 2011 11:00-12:30 p.m. Angela Branson, Director of Residential Education Melanie Thompson, Director, Center for Access-Ability Resources Northern Illinois University.

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Universal Design in Student Affairs: Engagement & Retention

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Universal design in student affairs engagement retention

Universal Design in Student Affairs: Engagement & Retention

AHEAD 2011 Conference

Session #1.9 Wednesday, July 13, 2011 11:00-12:30 p.m.

Angela Branson, Director of Residential Education

Melanie Thompson, Director, Center for Access-Ability Resources

Northern Illinois University


Learning objectives

Learning Objectives

Universal Design/Universal Design for Learning

Explain the principles of UD/UDL.

Demonstrate how UD with a social justice model increases access and inclusion.

Discuss how increased access and inclusion across various components of diversity may positively impact engagement and retention.


7 principles of ud

7 Principles of UD

UD – Universal Design

Equitable use

Flexibility in use

Simple and intuitive use

Perceptible information

Tolerance for error

Low physical effort

Size and space for approach and use

When factored in on front end (as design is occurring) it reduces need for retroactive fixes or accommodations, which cost more money.


3 principles of udl

3 Principles of UDL

UDL – Universal Design for Learning

Provide multiple means of representation

Provide multiple means of action and expression

Provide multiple means of engagement


Disability framework

Disability Framework

Medical Model

Disability is a deficit

Disability can be corrected

Accommodations are one way to correct

Reactive approach

Social Justice Model

Disability is neutral

Disability is magnified by barriers

Good design reduces needs for accommodations and impact of disability

Proactive design


Application format of materials

Application – Format of Materials

1. Equitable use 2. Flexibility in use 3. Simple and intuitive use 4. Perceptible information 5. Tolerance for error 6. Low physical effort 7. Size and space for approach and use

Hard copy, electronic copy

(1,2,3,4, multiple means of engagement)

Color contrast (3,4)

Font style/color (3,4)

Word choice (1,4)

Online accessible (1,3,5)


Comparison of bad vs good flyer design

Comparison of bad vs good flyer design

Images of program flyers to see Wicked in Chicago.


Application programming

Application – Programming

1. Equitable use 2. Flexibility in use 3. Simple and intuitive use 4. Perceptible information 5. Tolerance for error 6. Low physical effort 7. Size and space for approach and use

Email flyer in accessible format, in addition to posting (1,2,3,4, multiple means of engagement)

Common reading books in varied (accessible) formats (1,2,3,4, multiple means of representation and engagement)

Accessible Locations (1,2,5,6,7)


Application activities example team building

Application – ActivitiesExample: Team Building

1. Equitable use 2. Flexibility in use 3. Simple and intuitive use 4. Perceptible information 5. Tolerance for error 6. Low physical effort 7. Size and space for approach and use

Establish purpose of activity (Show learning objectives, state learning objectives, give examples)

(1,2,3,4, multiple means of representation)

Evaluate activity for inclusion and access (Physical location, different physical abilities, gender neutral, different cognitive abilities)

(1,5,6,7, multiple means of action and expression)

Wide range of options, people can select which ones to participate with (Score keeper, timer, verbal components, physical components)

(1,2,3,6, multiple means of engagement)


Application space design

Application – Space & Design

1. Equitable use 2. Flexibility in use 3. Simple and intuitive use 4. Perceptible information 5. Tolerance for error 6. Low physical effort 7. Size and space for approach and use

Sidewalks (1,3,4,5,7)

Vending machines (potentially all)

Door access (e.g. keys vs. cards; handles vs. levers; combinations) (potentially all)

Emergency alarm systems with visual, aural, and kinesthetic characteristics (1,2,3,4)

Hours of operation (1,2,6)


Application sustainable

Application – Sustainable

1. Equitable use 2. Flexibility in use 3. Simple and intuitive use 4. Perceptible information 5. Tolerance for error 6. Low physical effort 7. Size and space for approach and use

Providing resources online vs. preprinting resources

Shifting to providing resources online may encourage program contributors to be ready ahead of time

Look at ways to incorporate as moving forward


Engagement retention

Engagement & Retention

Planning & assessment

Student feedback

UDL considers learning style and student centered service, in addition to ability awareness

Who else benefits from UD

Collaborate with Student Affairs units

Understand your audience before “converting” to UD


Small group activity

Small Group Activity

Activity will be discussed during session.


Research references

Research & References

Research:

National Science Foundation

Department of Education

References:

AHEAD

Burgstahler, S.E., & Cory, R.C. (Eds.) (2008). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Literature

UD/UDL website www.udlcenter.org


You may already be applying ud

You may already be applying UD

Trainings; policies & procedures – acronyms and glossary (UD 2)

Using visual aids to compliment learning vs. just providing data (UD 2, 3, 5/UDL 1, 3)

Information on websites, brochures & flyers (UDL 1)

Programming that targets introverts & extroverts (UDL 1-3)

Open space technology for trainings (UDL 1-3)

Incorporating learning styles – similar to UDL


Conclusion

Conclusion

Thank you for your interest in utilizing UD in Student Affairs. If we can be helpful in your journey, we would be happy to hear from you!

Contact us:

Angela BransonMelanie Thompson

[email protected]@niu.edu


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