Georgia Gold Medal Winners   1996 to 2009

Georgia Gold Medal Winners 1996 to 2009 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 229 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Georgia Plant Selections Committee. . Organized in 1993, the Georgia Plant Selections Committee is composed of nursery and greenhouse growers, landscapers, landscape architects, garden center managers, botanical garden horticulturists, and university faculty, all working to promote the production, s

Download Presentation

Georgia Gold Medal Winners 1996 to 2009

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


1. Title SlideTitle Slide

2. Georgia Plant Selections Committee The Georgia Plant Selections Committee was organized in 1993 with representatives from all facets of Georgia’s Green Industry, all working together to promote the production, sale and use of superior ornamental plants.The Georgia Plant Selections Committee was organized in 1993 with representatives from all facets of Georgia’s Green Industry, all working together to promote the production, sale and use of superior ornamental plants.

3. Plant Selections Process The Committee meets 3 times each year January – Georgia Green Industry Conference June – UGA Trial Garden Open House Fall – Various Locations Plants are nominated at the Fall and January meetings and voted on at the June meeting. To allow growers lead time to grow the plants, woody selections are made four years in advance and herbaceous winners two years in advance. The committee meets 3 times each year – at the Georgia Green Industry Conference in January, at the UGA Trial Gardens Open House in June, and in the fall. The nomination process begins at the fall meeting and is added to and refined at the January meeting. The final list is voted on at the June meeting. The newly selected winners are announced to growers in the fall. In order to give growers plenty of lead time to grow the plants, woody selections are made four years in advance, and herbaceous selections two years in advance. In other words, growers will know the woody selections for 2010 in 2006. The committee meets 3 times each year – at the Georgia Green Industry Conference in January, at the UGA Trial Gardens Open House in June, and in the fall. The nomination process begins at the fall meeting and is added to and refined at the January meeting. The final list is voted on at the June meeting. The newly selected winners are announced to growers in the fall. In order to give growers plenty of lead time to grow the plants, woody selections are made four years in advance, and herbaceous selections two years in advance. In other words, growers will know the woody selections for 2010 in 2006.

4. Plant Selections Process A Gold Medal Winner is selected in each of five categories: Annual Herbaceous Perennial Shrub Tree Vine/Groundcover (Added in 2003) From 1994 to 2002 the committee selected winners in four categories: Annual, Herbaceous Perennial, Shrub, and Tree. Then, in 2003, a Vine/Groundcover category was added. From 1994 to 2002 the committee selected winners in four categories: Annual, Herbaceous Perennial, Shrub, and Tree. Then, in 2003, a Vine/Groundcover category was added.

5. Plant Selections Process Only committee members or sponsors of the Georgia Gold Medal Program can nominate plants. Membership is open to anyone in the Georgia Green Industry, but he/she must attend at least two consecutive meetings in order to nominate plants. Only committee members or sponsors of the Georgia Gold Medal Program can nominate plants. The person making the nomination must fill out a nomination form and bring photos or plants to the meeting to support their nomination. Membership is open to anyone in the Georgia Green Industry, but the member must attend two consecutive meetings before he/she is eligible to nominate plants. Only committee members or sponsors of the Georgia Gold Medal Program can nominate plants. The person making the nomination must fill out a nomination form and bring photos or plants to the meeting to support their nomination. Membership is open to anyone in the Georgia Green Industry, but the member must attend two consecutive meetings before he/she is eligible to nominate plants.

6. Selection Criteria Consumer Appeal Maintenance Requirements Survivability Ease of Propagation Non-invasive Seasonal Interest The committee considers a number of selection criteria when discussing the merits of each plant: First, the plant should offer outstanding or unusual characteristics that consumers will find appealing. If the plant is low-maintenance, has few pest problems and survives or thrives with a minimal amount of extra care, it is given special consideration. From the grower’s perspective, the plant should be easy to propagate. It should not possess invasive properties that may cause it to spread beyond where it is planted or compete with other plants. Finally, seasonal interest, such as the length of bloom, fall color, or exfoliating bark, are considered and discussed.The committee considers a number of selection criteria when discussing the merits of each plant: First, the plant should offer outstanding or unusual characteristics that consumers will find appealing. If the plant is low-maintenance, has few pest problems and survives or thrives with a minimal amount of extra care, it is given special consideration. From the grower’s perspective, the plant should be easy to propagate. It should not possess invasive properties that may cause it to spread beyond where it is planted or compete with other plants. Finally, seasonal interest, such as the length of bloom, fall color, or exfoliating bark, are considered and discussed.

7. In January, the winners for that year are announced to the general public through media releases, trade shows, and gardening events. Color fact sheets are produced for distribution and the information is posted on the Internet at: www.georgiagoldmedalplants.org In January, the winners for that year are announced to the general public through media releases, trade shows, and gardening events. Color fact sheets are produced for distribution and the information is posted on the Internet at: www.georgiagoldmedalplants.org

8. Now, let’s look at some of the award winning qualities of some of the Georgia Gold Medal Winners through the years. Now, let’s look at some of the award winning qualities of some of the Georgia Gold Medal Winners through the years.

9. 1994 Herbaceous Perennial Bath’s Pink Dianthus (Dianthus gratianopolitanus) Bath's Pink Dianthus is an ideal perennial for sunny garden spots. It is named in honor of its discoverer, Jane Bath, of Stone Mountain, Georgia. The foliage provides an attractive gray-green groundcover throughout the year. In spring, bright pink, ruffled flowers rise above the foliage and persist for about 4 weeks. The old blossoms fade away as new growth begins. Bath’s Pink Dianthus is remarkably heat-resistant and cold tolerant, but it does require both good drainage and supplemental irrigation during periods of limited rainfall. Well-established plants can be dug and divided in fall for planting in new beds. Bath's Pink Dianthus is an ideal perennial for sunny garden spots. It is named in honor of its discoverer, Jane Bath, of Stone Mountain, Georgia. The foliage provides an attractive gray-green groundcover throughout the year. In spring, bright pink, ruffled flowers rise above the foliage and persist for about 4 weeks. The old blossoms fade away as new growth begins. Bath’s Pink Dianthus is remarkably heat-resistant and cold tolerant, but it does require both good drainage and supplemental irrigation during periods of limited rainfall. Well-established plants can be dug and divided in fall for planting in new beds.

10. Mt. Airy Fothergilla is an old plant re-discovered by Dr. Michael Dirr at the Mt. Airy Arboretum in Cincinnati, Ohio. Fothergilla is a native plant but this selection has larger blooms and more brilliant fall color than what is typically found in the native population. Creamy-white, bottle-brush looking blooms with a sweet honey fragrance are borne on naked stems before the foliage emerges. The flowers are followed by gray-green, pest-free foliage. When fall arrives, the plant becomes a kaleidoscope of color, with orange, yellow and red foliage. Fothergilla 'Mt. Airy' prefers full sun or partial shade and moist well-drained soils. It grows 5 to 6 feet tall with a spread of 6 feet. Because it is deciduous (has no leaves in winter), it is best to plant it against an evergreen background. Mt. Airy Fothergilla is an old plant re-discovered by Dr. Michael Dirr at the Mt. Airy Arboretum in Cincinnati, Ohio. Fothergilla is a native plant but this selection has larger blooms and more brilliant fall color than what is typically found in the native population. Creamy-white, bottle-brush looking blooms with a sweet honey fragrance are borne on naked stems before the foliage emerges. The flowers are followed by gray-green, pest-free foliage. When fall arrives, the plant becomes a kaleidoscope of color, with orange, yellow and red foliage. Fothergilla 'Mt. Airy' prefers full sun or partial shade and moist well-drained soils. It grows 5 to 6 feet tall with a spread of 6 feet. Because it is deciduous (has no leaves in winter), it is best to plant it against an evergreen background.

11. Low-growing forms of Japanese Plum Yew add a new dimension to the landscape with their feathery evergreen texture, compact growth habit and adaptability to many soils and microclimates. Two forms are readily available in the trade: `Prostrata' and a variety called drupacea. Both have a similar growth habit growing 2 feet high and spreading 4 feet wide. Japanese Plum Yew prefers morning sun and afternoon shade and is an excellent substitute for junipers in shady environments. Moist, well-drained soils are preferred. An added feature of Japanese Plum Yew is that it is deer tolerant. Low-growing forms of Japanese Plum Yew add a new dimension to the landscape with their feathery evergreen texture, compact growth habit and adaptability to many soils and microclimates. Two forms are readily available in the trade: `Prostrata' and a variety called drupacea. Both have a similar growth habit growing 2 feet high and spreading 4 feet wide. Japanese Plum Yew prefers morning sun and afternoon shade and is an excellent substitute for junipers in shady environments. Moist, well-drained soils are preferred. An added feature of Japanese Plum Yew is that it is deer tolerant.

12. New Gold Lantana is an annual offering a profuse display of golden yellow flowers. It is perfect for sunny borders, planters, or cascading from a hanging basket. Once established, it grows rapidly, forming a dense mound 2 to 3 feet across. It blooms consistently from April until the first frost and requires no dead-heading. Heat and wet weather tolerance are other assets of Lantana 'New Gold'. It has few pest and disease problems and is highly resistant to deer browsing.New Gold Lantana is an annual offering a profuse display of golden yellow flowers. It is perfect for sunny borders, planters, or cascading from a hanging basket. Once established, it grows rapidly, forming a dense mound 2 to 3 feet across. It blooms consistently from April until the first frost and requires no dead-heading. Heat and wet weather tolerance are other assets of Lantana 'New Gold'. It has few pest and disease problems and is highly resistant to deer browsing.

13. A continuous season-long display of deep-blue flowers helped earn Blue Anise Sage a Gold Medal Award in 1995. Mature, established plants can produce several thousand nectar-producing flowers that attract hummingbirds and swallowtail butterflies. Blue Anise Sage is a trouble-free selection, growing upright to five feet with a spread of two to four feet. The plant is classified as a semi-hardy perennial and is reportedly winter hardy as far north as southern Tennessee. Few pests affect it. Full sun and well-drained soils are essential. As with other salvias, dead-heading or removing old flowers as they fade will encourage additional blooms. A continuous season-long display of deep-blue flowers helped earn Blue Anise Sage a Gold Medal Award in 1995. Mature, established plants can produce several thousand nectar-producing flowers that attract hummingbirds and swallowtail butterflies. Blue Anise Sage is a trouble-free selection, growing upright to five feet with a spread of two to four feet. The plant is classified as a semi-hardy perennial and is reportedly winter hardy as far north as southern Tennessee. Few pests affect it. Full sun and well-drained soils are essential. As with other salvias, dead-heading or removing old flowers as they fade will encourage additional blooms.

14. Annabelle Hydrangea is a magnificent spring flowering shrub ideally suited to shady, moist, well-drained, areas of the garden. It grows three to five feet tall with a 4 to 6 feet span. Annabelle Hydrangeas look particularly nice when planted in groups of 3 to 5 plants. It has no serious insect or disease problems. The flowers can be dried and used in floral arrangements. 'Annabelle' was discovered by two ladies who were riding horses near Anna, Illinois. They noticed the uniqueness of the flowers and brought the plant back to their garden in Anna. The two “belles” and the town of Anna resulted in the cultivar name. Annabelle Hydrangea is a magnificent spring flowering shrub ideally suited to shady, moist, well-drained, areas of the garden. It grows three to five feet tall with a 4 to 6 feet span. Annabelle Hydrangeas look particularly nice when planted in groups of 3 to 5 plants. It has no serious insect or disease problems. The flowers can be dried and used in floral arrangements. 'Annabelle' was discovered by two ladies who were riding horses near Anna, Illinois. They noticed the uniqueness of the flowers and brought the plant back to their garden in Anna. The two “belles” and the town of Anna resulted in the cultivar name.

15. Purple Wave Petunia is one of the most vigorous and durable petunias ever produced. It is an extremely heat-tolerant summer annual. It hugs the ground, forming a dense mat of flowers from spring to fall. A single plant will cover 4 square feet by mid-season. It doesn’t get leggy like other petunias. It’s also a showstopper in hanging baskets and patio pots. A single plant will fill a 12-inch basket. The flowers of Purple Wave Petunia are rose-purple. 'Purple Wave' was the first in a series of 'Wave' Petunias. 'Pink Wave' and 'Lavender Wave' are also popular selections. Full sun, well-drained soil, room to grow, and a steady nutrient supply are recommended. Purple Wave Petunia is one of the most vigorous and durable petunias ever produced. It is an extremely heat-tolerant summer annual. It hugs the ground, forming a dense mat of flowers from spring to fall. A single plant will cover 4 square feet by mid-season. It doesn’t get leggy like other petunias. It’s also a showstopper in hanging baskets and patio pots. A single plant will fill a 12-inch basket. The flowers of Purple Wave Petunia are rose-purple. 'Purple Wave' was the first in a series of 'Wave' Petunias. 'Pink Wave' and 'Lavender Wave' are also popular selections. Full sun, well-drained soil, room to grow, and a steady nutrient supply are recommended.

16. Yoshino Japanese Cedar can be either a tall, dense, evergreen screen or a graceful specimen tree. This tall, stately conifer will reach 30 feet in height with a spread of 15 feet. Yoshino Cryptomeria lends textural interest and color contrast to the landscape. The summer needle color is glistening blue-green. The foliage will develop a bronze-purple hue in winter. Yoshino Japanese Cedar prospers in either sun or shade. It grows fast and and provides a shade-tolerant alternative to Leyland cypress. It prefers moist, rich soils, but it is tolerant of sandy or clay soils. Little pruning is required. Yoshino Japanese Cedar can be either a tall, dense, evergreen screen or a graceful specimen tree. This tall, stately conifer will reach 30 feet in height with a spread of 15 feet. Yoshino Cryptomeria lends textural interest and color contrast to the landscape. The summer needle color is glistening blue-green. The foliage will develop a bronze-purple hue in winter. Yoshino Japanese Cedar prospers in either sun or shade. It grows fast and and provides a shade-tolerant alternative to Leyland cypress. It prefers moist, rich soils, but it is tolerant of sandy or clay soils. Little pruning is required.

17. Few plants can match the spectacular flowering of Bottlebrush Buckeye with its tall, upright spikes of white flowers. Native from South Carolina to Alabama and Florida, Bottlebrush Buckeye is a large, mounded shrub suitable for planting in shady to partially sunny sites. Since it is deciduous, it makes a nice background shrub behind herbaceous perennials or lower evergreen shrubs. Coarse, pest-free foliage adds textural interest to the landscape in summer and seasonal interest in fall as it fades from deep green to bright yellow. Pest resistance and tolerance to deer browsing are additional award-winning qualities. Few plants can match the spectacular flowering of Bottlebrush Buckeye with its tall, upright spikes of white flowers. Native from South Carolina to Alabama and Florida, Bottlebrush Buckeye is a large, mounded shrub suitable for planting in shady to partially sunny sites. Since it is deciduous, it makes a nice background shrub behind herbaceous perennials or lower evergreen shrubs. Coarse, pest-free foliage adds textural interest to the landscape in summer and seasonal interest in fall as it fades from deep green to bright yellow. Pest resistance and tolerance to deer browsing are additional award-winning qualities.

18. Trident maple is an excellent small shade tree for the landscape or city street. It grows 25 to 35 feet tall, with an equal spread. It is particularly attractive when grown as a multi-trunk tree next to a patio. The three lobed leaves are a lustrous green in summer and turn from red to orange and yellow in fall. As the tree matures the bark exfoliates to shades of gray, brown, and orange. Trident maple prefers well-drained soils and full sun to partial shade. It adapts to coastal sand and North Georgia clay, and tolerates wind, salt, and air pollution. Trident maple is an excellent small shade tree for the landscape or city street. It grows 25 to 35 feet tall, with an equal spread. It is particularly attractive when grown as a multi-trunk tree next to a patio. The three lobed leaves are a lustrous green in summer and turn from red to orange and yellow in fall. As the tree matures the bark exfoliates to shades of gray, brown, and orange. Trident maple prefers well-drained soils and full sun to partial shade. It adapts to coastal sand and North Georgia clay, and tolerates wind, salt, and air pollution.

19. Plant Pentas (also called Egyptian starflowers) to attract swarms of butterflies and flocks of hummingbirds. Native to tropical Arabia and east Africa, Pentas thrives in hot, humid summers. It is sure to please gardeners and landscapers looking for an alternative to marigolds and zinnias. Pentas are available in a variety of colors, from red to white, lavender and pink. However, the Georgia Plant Selections Committee singled out one variety, 'Nova', as superior to the rest. A single plant may have 10 to 15 clusters of rose-pink flowers, each with 10 to 30 florets. The plants grow about 15 inches wide and 2½ feet tall. Even during wet periods, Nova Pentas continues to grow and flower without major disease problems. Pentas prefers warm soils, full-sun, and good drainage. Occasional deadheading (removal of old blossoms) will keep the plants vigorous. Nova Pentas roots readily when placed in well-drained potting soil and kept moist. Cuttings can also be taken in late fall to maintain plants over the winter for spring planting. Plant Pentas (also called Egyptian starflowers) to attract swarms of butterflies and flocks of hummingbirds. Native to tropical Arabia and east Africa, Pentas thrives in hot, humid summers. It is sure to please gardeners and landscapers looking for an alternative to marigolds and zinnias. Pentas are available in a variety of colors, from red to white, lavender and pink. However, the Georgia Plant Selections Committee singled out one variety, 'Nova', as superior to the rest. A single plant may have 10 to 15 clusters of rose-pink flowers, each with 10 to 30 florets. The plants grow about 15 inches wide and 2½ feet tall. Even during wet periods, Nova Pentas continues to grow and flower without major disease problems. Pentas prefers warm soils, full-sun, and good drainage. Occasional deadheading (removal of old blossoms) will keep the plants vigorous. Nova Pentas roots readily when placed in well-drained potting soil and kept moist. Cuttings can also be taken in late fall to maintain plants over the winter for spring planting.

20. Lenten rose, (Helleborus orientalis) is a "tough as nails" herbaceous perennial and a long-time favorite of Georgia gardeners. Sometimes called Christmas rose, Lenten rose isn’t a true rose. It's a member of the Ranunculus family. Most of the year it serves as a durable, glossy, evergreen ground cover in dry, shady places. When blooms appear in midwinter, Lenten rose becomes the center of attention. Its cup-shaped, bell-like flowers may be white, pink, plum, green, magenta, and pastel shades in between. Individual leaves are large, with seven to nine leaflets spreading from a central point, like spokes on a wheel. The foliage is deer tolerant. Lenten rose is best planted in fall and may take several years to fill in and form a solid groundcover. It is a great pass-along plant for sharing with friends and neighbors.Lenten rose, (Helleborus orientalis) is a "tough as nails" herbaceous perennial and a long-time favorite of Georgia gardeners. Sometimes called Christmas rose, Lenten rose isn’t a true rose. It's a member of the Ranunculus family. Most of the year it serves as a durable, glossy, evergreen ground cover in dry, shady places. When blooms appear in midwinter, Lenten rose becomes the center of attention. Its cup-shaped, bell-like flowers may be white, pink, plum, green, magenta, and pastel shades in between. Individual leaves are large, with seven to nine leaflets spreading from a central point, like spokes on a wheel. The foliage is deer tolerant. Lenten rose is best planted in fall and may take several years to fill in and form a solid groundcover. It is a great pass-along plant for sharing with friends and neighbors.

21. Fragrant flowers, pest-free foliage, outstanding fall color and interesting, pale gray bark make American Yellowwood an excellent tree for today’s urban landscapes. It is a native tree named for the color of its heartwood. It may take an American Yellowwood five to eight years to come into bloom, but it's well worth the wait. Flowering is a sight to behold in late April and early May when fragrant panicles of white flowers cascade from the ends of branches. The rich green leaves of summer, turn to soft yellow in the fall. American Yellowwood grows best in full sun to partial shade and well-drained soils. In the wild it grows on limestone ridges, so some liming may be needed when grown in acidic soils. Few insects and diseases bother a properly maintained American Yellowwood. Drought-tolerance makes it an excellent choice for low-water-use sites.Fragrant flowers, pest-free foliage, outstanding fall color and interesting, pale gray bark make American Yellowwood an excellent tree for today’s urban landscapes. It is a native tree named for the color of its heartwood. It may take an American Yellowwood five to eight years to come into bloom, but it's well worth the wait. Flowering is a sight to behold in late April and early May when fragrant panicles of white flowers cascade from the ends of branches. The rich green leaves of summer, turn to soft yellow in the fall. American Yellowwood grows best in full sun to partial shade and well-drained soils. In the wild it grows on limestone ridges, so some liming may be needed when grown in acidic soils. Few insects and diseases bother a properly maintained American Yellowwood. Drought-tolerance makes it an excellent choice for low-water-use sites.

22. Coleus are no longer strictly plants for shade. Sun Coleus are a whole new series of Coleus that not only tolerate the sun, but thrive in it. Leaf colors are dazzling, ranging from deep crimson to brilliant chartreuse and golden sunset orange. ‘Solar Sunrise’ and ‘Alabama Sunset’ are shown here, but there are other popular selections in the sun-loving series: ‘Solar Flare’, ‘Red Ruffles’, ‘Cranberry Salad’ and ‘Purple Ducksfoot’. Several varieties of Sun Coleus are available on the market. Use sun-loving coleus as a bedding plant in the landscape, or in containers and large hanging baskets. Plants grow 18 to 36 inches tall and wide. When planted in containers, they will cascade decoratively over the side. Cuttings root easily in water or potting soil and can be used to expand your color display or as gifts for friends and neighbors.Coleus are no longer strictly plants for shade. Sun Coleus are a whole new series of Coleus that not only tolerate the sun, but thrive in it. Leaf colors are dazzling, ranging from deep crimson to brilliant chartreuse and golden sunset orange. ‘Solar Sunrise’ and ‘Alabama Sunset’ are shown here, but there are other popular selections in the sun-loving series: ‘Solar Flare’, ‘Red Ruffles’, ‘Cranberry Salad’ and ‘Purple Ducksfoot’. Several varieties of Sun Coleus are available on the market. Use sun-loving coleus as a bedding plant in the landscape, or in containers and large hanging baskets. Plants grow 18 to 36 inches tall and wide. When planted in containers, they will cascade decoratively over the side. Cuttings root easily in water or potting soil and can be used to expand your color display or as gifts for friends and neighbors.

23. Little Gem Magnolia has the same grace and charm as its native parent, Southern Magnolia, but on a much smaller scale. At maturity, height is 20+ feet and width is about 10 to 15 feet. Because of its small stature and evergreen foliage, Little Gem Magnolia can be used as a small specimen tree, as a dark-green background to shrubs, or as a hedge along the property line. With careful pruning, it also can be trained as an espalier along a wall. Leaves and flowers are smaller than the native species, which makes leaf litter much less of a problem. Flowering begins in spring and continues through fall. An added benefit of ‘Little Gem’ is that it flowers at an early age; a three-gallon size plant is likely to flower the first growing season. Flowers also are delightfully fragrant Little Gem Magnolia is very adaptable, but prefers full sun to partial shade, and acid, well-drained soils.Little Gem Magnolia has the same grace and charm as its native parent, Southern Magnolia, but on a much smaller scale. At maturity, height is 20+ feet and width is about 10 to 15 feet. Because of its small stature and evergreen foliage, Little Gem Magnolia can be used as a small specimen tree, as a dark-green background to shrubs, or as a hedge along the property line. With careful pruning, it also can be trained as an espalier along a wall. Leaves and flowers are smaller than the native species, which makes leaf litter much less of a problem. Flowering begins in spring and continues through fall. An added benefit of ‘Little Gem’ is that it flowers at an early age; a three-gallon size plant is likely to flower the first growing season. Flowers also are delightfully fragrant Little Gem Magnolia is very adaptable, but prefers full sun to partial shade, and acid, well-drained soils.

24. Few vegetable plants have made such a dramatic crossover from the vegetable garden to the landscape, but ornamental sweet potatoes have become a landscape sensation! Blackie Sweet Potato (bottom right photo, foreground) with its purple, almost black, foliage has a vigorous, vine-like trailing growth habit, excellent for landscape beds or containers. The dark foliage offers a dramatic contrast to vivid colors, like those of pink and purple ‘Wave’ petunias. Another ornamental sweet potato, ‘Margarita’, (upper left) has striking chartreuse foliage that sets the summer landscape aglow. It provides a dramatic contrast when planted with ‘Blackie’. Another selection is ‘Tricolor’ (bottom right photo, center), which has shades of pink, magenta and green all in the same leaf. The roots of ornamental sweet potatoes are edible, but they are not very palatable. The plants were bred for their foliage, not their edible roots, so plant the edible types for cooking. Ornamental sweet potatoes are aggressive growers, so they need plenty of space to grow. Avoid planting them in 12-inch baskets because they dry out quickly.Few vegetable plants have made such a dramatic crossover from the vegetable garden to the landscape, but ornamental sweet potatoes have become a landscape sensation! Blackie Sweet Potato (bottom right photo, foreground) with its purple, almost black, foliage has a vigorous, vine-like trailing growth habit, excellent for landscape beds or containers. The dark foliage offers a dramatic contrast to vivid colors, like those of pink and purple ‘Wave’ petunias. Another ornamental sweet potato, ‘Margarita’, (upper left) has striking chartreuse foliage that sets the summer landscape aglow. It provides a dramatic contrast when planted with ‘Blackie’. Another selection is ‘Tricolor’ (bottom right photo, center), which has shades of pink, magenta and green all in the same leaf. The roots of ornamental sweet potatoes are edible, but they are not very palatable. The plants were bred for their foliage, not their edible roots, so plant the edible types for cooking. Ornamental sweet potatoes are aggressive growers, so they need plenty of space to grow. Avoid planting them in 12-inch baskets because they dry out quickly.

25. To achieve a lush, rain-forest-like ambiance in shady, moist sites, consider Autumn Fern. Unlike many of our native wood ferns that die back and disappear in winter, Autumn Fern is evergreen, providing year-round interest in the landscape. It grows to 18 inches high, with arching, fine-textured fronds. The new fronds unfold as bright, coppery red fiddleheads that gradually expand to olive green fronds. Autumn Fern is a perfect plant for naturalizing in pine woodlands or for erosion control in shady drainage easements. Although freezing temperatures, ice and snow sometimes burn the foliage, Autumn Fern is reliably evergreen in most parts of Georgia. Like other woodland ferns, it prefers filtered shade and moist, well-drained, acidic soils high in organic matter. To achieve a lush, rain-forest-like ambiance in shady, moist sites, consider Autumn Fern. Unlike many of our native wood ferns that die back and disappear in winter, Autumn Fern is evergreen, providing year-round interest in the landscape. It grows to 18 inches high, with arching, fine-textured fronds. The new fronds unfold as bright, coppery red fiddleheads that gradually expand to olive green fronds. Autumn Fern is a perfect plant for naturalizing in pine woodlands or for erosion control in shady drainage easements. Although freezing temperatures, ice and snow sometimes burn the foliage, Autumn Fern is reliably evergreen in most parts of Georgia. Like other woodland ferns, it prefers filtered shade and moist, well-drained, acidic soils high in organic matter.

26. Inkberry is a native evergreen shrub found along stream banks and flood plains. It thrives in shaded, moist sites. Beekeepers have long valued the plant as an excellent honey source. Early settlers dried and roasted the leaves to make an herbal tea. Today, there are more than 20 improved selections of Inkberry in the nursery trade, including ‘Shamrock’, ‘Nigra’, ‘Georgia Wine’, ‘Compacta’ and ‘UGA’. Use Inkberry for perennial borders, hedges or simply for naturalizing in shaded moist sites. Inkberry is a native evergreen shrub found along stream banks and flood plains. It thrives in shaded, moist sites. Beekeepers have long valued the plant as an excellent honey source. Early settlers dried and roasted the leaves to make an herbal tea. Today, there are more than 20 improved selections of Inkberry in the nursery trade, including ‘Shamrock’, ‘Nigra’, ‘Georgia Wine’, ‘Compacta’ and ‘UGA’. Use Inkberry for perennial borders, hedges or simply for naturalizing in shaded moist sites.

27. Chastetree, also called Summer Lilac can be trained as a large shrub or small multi-trunk tree, 15 to 20 feet tall with an equal spread, that will thrive in full sun to partially shaded sites and adapt to both moist and dry soils. It’s tough, pest resistant, and cold hardy. Chastetree flowers on new terminal growth in May and June. Prune it in late winter, prior to spring growth. The flowers are borne in masses on large, multi-branched panicles, much like crepe myrtle or butterfly bush. Flowers may be blue, lavender, pink or white, depending on the cultivar. Chastetree can be encouraged to repeat bloom in late summer by removing the terminal seed clusters soon after the first bloom finishes.Chastetree, also called Summer Lilac can be trained as a large shrub or small multi-trunk tree, 15 to 20 feet tall with an equal spread, that will thrive in full sun to partially shaded sites and adapt to both moist and dry soils. It’s tough, pest resistant, and cold hardy. Chastetree flowers on new terminal growth in May and June. Prune it in late winter, prior to spring growth. The flowers are borne in masses on large, multi-branched panicles, much like crepe myrtle or butterfly bush. Flowers may be blue, lavender, pink or white, depending on the cultivar. Chastetree can be encouraged to repeat bloom in late summer by removing the terminal seed clusters soon after the first bloom finishes.

28. Lady in Red Salvia is a non-stop bloomer in the summer landscape. It's the focus of attention in a large container or landscape bed, providing a brilliant back-drop for gray, blue, burgundy or white. ‘Lady in Red’ is a reseeding annual, so you're likely to experience many happy returns from the original planting. Seed can also be collected in fall and planted in March for April transplants and a head start on the growing season. Lady in Red Salvia prefers morning sun and afternoon shade, along with moist well-drained soil. Lady in Red Salvia is a non-stop bloomer in the summer landscape. It's the focus of attention in a large container or landscape bed, providing a brilliant back-drop for gray, blue, burgundy or white. ‘Lady in Red’ is a reseeding annual, so you're likely to experience many happy returns from the original planting. Seed can also be collected in fall and planted in March for April transplants and a head start on the growing season. Lady in Red Salvia prefers morning sun and afternoon shade, along with moist well-drained soil.

29. Blue Mist Bluebeard flowers in August and September, and bridges the gap between summer and fall flowering plants. Its clusters of sky-blue flowers look like puffs of blue from a distance. They complement yellow daisies, orange marigolds and other early fall bloomers. Blue Mist Bluebeard is a deciduous herbaceous perennial in north Georgia but may develop into a woody evergreen shrub in south Georgia. It grows 3 to 4 feet tall and wide. Leaves are bright green above and gray-green below. Another cultivar, called 'Worcester Gold', has yellow-gold foliage. Its flowers are about the same size and color as those of ‘Blue Mist’. Bluebeards prefer full sun and well-drained soils. They have excellent drought tolerance and good deer resistance.  Blue Mist Bluebeard flowers in August and September, and bridges the gap between summer and fall flowering plants. Its clusters of sky-blue flowers look like puffs of blue from a distance. They complement yellow daisies, orange marigolds and other early fall bloomers. Blue Mist Bluebeard is a deciduous herbaceous perennial in north Georgia but may develop into a woody evergreen shrub in south Georgia. It grows 3 to 4 feet tall and wide. Leaves are bright green above and gray-green below. Another cultivar, called 'Worcester Gold', has yellow-gold foliage. Its flowers are about the same size and color as those of ‘Blue Mist’. Bluebeards prefer full sun and well-drained soils. They have excellent drought tolerance and good deer resistance.  

30. Purple Beautyberry puts on an eye-catching display of dazzling, colored berries from September to October. Long, arching branches cascade to the ground, like streams from a fountain, bearing clusters of shiny lavender berries along their entire length. Purple Beautyberry is a prized transitional plant in the landscape, blending into the background most of the year, and then bursting into the foreground just when other flowering plants are beginning to fade in late summer. Purple Beautyberry is a deciduous shrub growing 3 to 4 feet tall with a mounded growth habit. It blooms on new growth, so thinning old branches in winter should not deter flowering and fruiting. Several beautyberries exist in the trade, including our native American Beautyberry, Callicarpa Americana, but Purple Beautyberry outshines all the others with its smaller, more attractive foliage and graceful, spreading growth habit.Purple Beautyberry puts on an eye-catching display of dazzling, colored berries from September to October. Long, arching branches cascade to the ground, like streams from a fountain, bearing clusters of shiny lavender berries along their entire length. Purple Beautyberry is a prized transitional plant in the landscape, blending into the background most of the year, and then bursting into the foreground just when other flowering plants are beginning to fade in late summer. Purple Beautyberry is a deciduous shrub growing 3 to 4 feet tall with a mounded growth habit. It blooms on new growth, so thinning old branches in winter should not deter flowering and fruiting. Several beautyberries exist in the trade, including our native American Beautyberry, Callicarpa Americana, but Purple Beautyberry outshines all the others with its smaller, more attractive foliage and graceful, spreading growth habit.

31. Anyone can grow redbud, but if you dare to be different, consider planting one of the improved selections of redbud, ‘Forest Pansy’, ‘Oklahoma’, or ‘Texas White’. Forest Pansy Redbud bears a shimmering red-purple foliage in spring, which fades to a deep plum-purple as the season progresses. Rose-pink flowers adorn the twigs and branches in March. Oklahoma Redbud has glossy, somewhat leathery green leaves with wavy margins. The leaves alone make the plant worth having, while the showy magenta-rose flowers in March are an added bonus. For a real conversation piece plant Texas White Redbud, a white-flowering redbud. (Should we call it a “whitebud”?) ‘Texas White’, discovered in Fort Worth, Texas, has glossy green leaves similar to those of Oklahoma, but it bears milky-white flowers. Each of these new redbud hybrids add interesting new qualities to a beloved native plant.  Anyone can grow redbud, but if you dare to be different, consider planting one of the improved selections of redbud, ‘Forest Pansy’, ‘Oklahoma’, or ‘Texas White’. Forest Pansy Redbud bears a shimmering red-purple foliage in spring, which fades to a deep plum-purple as the season progresses. Rose-pink flowers adorn the twigs and branches in March. Oklahoma Redbud has glossy, somewhat leathery green leaves with wavy margins. The leaves alone make the plant worth having, while the showy magenta-rose flowers in March are an added bonus. For a real conversation piece plant Texas White Redbud, a white-flowering redbud. (Should we call it a “whitebud”?) ‘Texas White’, discovered in Fort Worth, Texas, has glossy green leaves similar to those of Oklahoma, but it bears milky-white flowers. Each of these new redbud hybrids add interesting new qualities to a beloved native plant.  

32. When the Plant Selection Committee was looking for a tough, low-maintenance annual that bloomed non-stop from spring to fall frost, the ‘Star Series’ of Narrow-leaf Zinnia, Zinnia angustifolia, kept rising to the top of the list. ‘Star Gold,’ ‘Star Orange,’ ‘Star White’ and ‘Starbright Mixture’ make up the ‘Star Series’. Narrow-leaf Zinnia is native to dry arid areas of Mexico. Plants are low-growing, mound-shaped, and have narrow leaves. Each stem has numerous side branches, each of which forms a terminal daisy-like flower with a purplish-orange center. Narrow-leaf Zinnias are resistant to mildew and bacterial leaf spots that plague other types of zinnias. Insects are seldom a problem. They prefer full sun and dry soils. An added bonus is that they require no dead-heading. The old blossoms just fade into the background as new ones emerge.When the Plant Selection Committee was looking for a tough, low-maintenance annual that bloomed non-stop from spring to fall frost, the ‘Star Series’ of Narrow-leaf Zinnia, Zinnia angustifolia, kept rising to the top of the list. ‘Star Gold,’ ‘Star Orange,’ ‘Star White’ and ‘Starbright Mixture’ make up the ‘Star Series’. Narrow-leaf Zinnia is native to dry arid areas of Mexico. Plants are low-growing, mound-shaped, and have narrow leaves. Each stem has numerous side branches, each of which forms a terminal daisy-like flower with a purplish-orange center. Narrow-leaf Zinnias are resistant to mildew and bacterial leaf spots that plague other types of zinnias. Insects are seldom a problem. They prefer full sun and dry soils. An added bonus is that they require no dead-heading. The old blossoms just fade into the background as new ones emerge.

33. Miss Huff Lantana is a proven perennial in Georgia. Like other lantanas, it blooms continuously from spring until fall frost. It’s also drought tolerant and attractive to butterflies. Its pungent foliage is repulsive to deer. Miss Huff Lantana is widely adaptable, growing in the beach sands of coastal Georgia and the heavy clays of north Georgia. It thrives in harsh highway islands and sidewalk plantings where other plants struggle. Miss Huff Lantana may reach 5 to 6 feet tall and 10 feet wide at maturity. Flowers are dense heads, 2 to 3 inches wide, composed of many small florets. Florets range in color from pink to orange and yellow, giving each flower cluster a multicolored appearance. Its pea-sized green fruit turn black with maturity. They produce no viable seeds, so unwanted seedlings are not a problem. Like other lantanas, ‘Miss Huff’ dies back after the first fall frost. Although it is tempting to prune back the old foliage soon after fall frost singes it, cold hardiness increases when pruning is delayed until early spring, just as new growth emerges from the crown or base of the plant.  Miss Huff Lantana is a proven perennial in Georgia. Like other lantanas, it blooms continuously from spring until fall frost. It’s also drought tolerant and attractive to butterflies. Its pungent foliage is repulsive to deer. Miss Huff Lantana is widely adaptable, growing in the beach sands of coastal Georgia and the heavy clays of north Georgia. It thrives in harsh highway islands and sidewalk plantings where other plants struggle. Miss Huff Lantana may reach 5 to 6 feet tall and 10 feet wide at maturity. Flowers are dense heads, 2 to 3 inches wide, composed of many small florets. Florets range in color from pink to orange and yellow, giving each flower cluster a multicolored appearance. Its pea-sized green fruit turn black with maturity. They produce no viable seeds, so unwanted seedlings are not a problem. Like other lantanas, ‘Miss Huff’ dies back after the first fall frost. Although it is tempting to prune back the old foliage soon after fall frost singes it, cold hardiness increases when pruning is delayed until early spring, just as new growth emerges from the crown or base of the plant.  

34. Henry Anise-tree is not really a tree but a broadleaf evergreen shrub growing 6 to 8 feet tall and wide. It thrives in dense shade and is an excellent choice for woodland settings. Added benefits are glossy, pest-free foliage and crimson-pink flowers in April and May. Deer avoid Henry Anise-tree due to its pungent aromatic foliage, which smells like licorice when crushed. While other Anise-trees thin out in shade, Henry maintains a dense, pyramidal growth form, mimicking rhododendron but requiring much less fuss. Plant Henry Anise-tree in shade or partial shade in moist, well-drained soils. Occasional irrigation during periods of limited rainfall, and mulching to conserve moisture in the soil, will keep Henry Anise-tree looking its best. Henry Anise-tree is not really a tree but a broadleaf evergreen shrub growing 6 to 8 feet tall and wide. It thrives in dense shade and is an excellent choice for woodland settings. Added benefits are glossy, pest-free foliage and crimson-pink flowers in April and May. Deer avoid Henry Anise-tree due to its pungent aromatic foliage, which smells like licorice when crushed. While other Anise-trees thin out in shade, Henry maintains a dense, pyramidal growth form, mimicking rhododendron but requiring much less fuss. Plant Henry Anise-tree in shade or partial shade in moist, well-drained soils. Occasional irrigation during periods of limited rainfall, and mulching to conserve moisture in the soil, will keep Henry Anise-tree looking its best.

35. Crossvine is the first vine to be named a Georgia Gold Medal Winner. It’s a tough, evergreen native vine found growing on trees in moist woodland soils from Maryland to Florida, and west to Louisiana. Brownish-red tubular flowers in spring attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Crossvine is heat-tolerant, drought-tolerant, and deer resistant. There are several cultivars in the trade, including ‘Jekyll’ having orange flowers and ‘Tangerine Beauty’ with ruby-tangerine flowers. It’s a vigorous climber, reaching 30 to 50 feet. The lustrous, dark green leaves turn reddish-purple in winter. Flowering continues for three to four weeks with a few additional flowers opening sporadically throughout the season. Crossvine prefers moist, acidic, well-drained soils and full sun to partial shade. Prune as necessary to control growth.Crossvine is the first vine to be named a Georgia Gold Medal Winner. It’s a tough, evergreen native vine found growing on trees in moist woodland soils from Maryland to Florida, and west to Louisiana. Brownish-red tubular flowers in spring attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Crossvine is heat-tolerant, drought-tolerant, and deer resistant. There are several cultivars in the trade, including ‘Jekyll’ having orange flowers and ‘Tangerine Beauty’ with ruby-tangerine flowers. It’s a vigorous climber, reaching 30 to 50 feet. The lustrous, dark green leaves turn reddish-purple in winter. Flowering continues for three to four weeks with a few additional flowers opening sporadically throughout the season. Crossvine prefers moist, acidic, well-drained soils and full sun to partial shade. Prune as necessary to control growth.

36. “Billowing clouds of white” describes Chinese Fringetree in bloom. The pure white, strap-like flowers are borne in such profusion they often mask the foliage. Chinese Fringetree blooms about a month later than dogwood, thus extending the spring floral display. As the tree ages, the bark exfoliates into paper-like curls which add additional interest to the plant. Pest resistance and drought tolerance are other admirable qualities that made Chinese Fringetree a Gold Medal Winner in 2003. Chinese Fringetree can be grown as a large multi-stem shrub or small tree, reaching 15 to 25 feet at maturity. Leaves are oval, leathery, and a lustrous dark green. Although the tree is deciduous, the leaves often persist into December. “Billowing clouds of white” describes Chinese Fringetree in bloom. The pure white, strap-like flowers are borne in such profusion they often mask the foliage. Chinese Fringetree blooms about a month later than dogwood, thus extending the spring floral display. As the tree ages, the bark exfoliates into paper-like curls which add additional interest to the plant. Pest resistance and drought tolerance are other admirable qualities that made Chinese Fringetree a Gold Medal Winner in 2003. Chinese Fringetree can be grown as a large multi-stem shrub or small tree, reaching 15 to 25 feet at maturity. Leaves are oval, leathery, and a lustrous dark green. Although the tree is deciduous, the leaves often persist into December.

37. Like glowing beams of sunshine, Chartreuse Joseph’s Coat is a dazzling, trouble-free addition to any landscape. It is prized for its eye-catching yellow-green foliage, compact growth habit, and durability. In container gardens and hanging baskets, it spills over the side like froth from a bubbling stream. Chartreuse Joseph’s Coat goes by several common names, including Golden Parrot Leaf, Golden Alternanthera, or Chartreuse Calico Plant. Landscapers call it Chartreuse Alternanthera to avoid the common name confusion. Joseph’s Coat is an heirloom annual that was popular in the Victorian era when formal gardens were in vogue. It prefers full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soils. Like glowing beams of sunshine, Chartreuse Joseph’s Coat is a dazzling, trouble-free addition to any landscape. It is prized for its eye-catching yellow-green foliage, compact growth habit, and durability. In container gardens and hanging baskets, it spills over the side like froth from a bubbling stream. Chartreuse Joseph’s Coat goes by several common names, including Golden Parrot Leaf, Golden Alternanthera, or Chartreuse Calico Plant. Landscapers call it Chartreuse Alternanthera to avoid the common name confusion. Joseph’s Coat is an heirloom annual that was popular in the Victorian era when formal gardens were in vogue. It prefers full sun to partial shade and moist, well-drained soils.

38. Anise Hyssop is a native aromatic herb used to flavor teas, cakes, bread and poultry. These hybrids of the native species, bred for their flowering qualities, lack some of the herbal qualities of the native species, but they are outstanding ornamental plants for the landscape. They are ‘Tutti Frutti’, ‘Firebird’, ‘Apricot Sunrise’, and ‘Blue Fortune’. Each of the Anise Hyssop Hybrids grows to a different height and has a different flower color. ‘Tutti Frutti’ grows 3 to 4 feet tall with raspberry-rose-pink tubular flowers. ‘Firebird’ grows 2 to 3 feet tall and produces copper-orange tubular flowers. ‘Apricot Sunrise’ grows 18 inches tall and bears orange-apricot tubular flowers. ‘Blue Fortune’ (shown here) grows 3 feet tall and produces an abundance of compressed, blue-purple, tubular flowers in the form of a flower spike. All selections bloom continuously from May to October, and are highly attractive to insects, hummingbirds, and butterflies. Their pungent foliage makes them undesirable to deer. Full sun and well-drained soils are required. Once established, the plants have an exceptional degree of drought tolerance. Anise Hyssop is a native aromatic herb used to flavor teas, cakes, bread and poultry. These hybrids of the native species, bred for their flowering qualities, lack some of the herbal qualities of the native species, but they are outstanding ornamental plants for the landscape. They are ‘Tutti Frutti’, ‘Firebird’, ‘Apricot Sunrise’, and ‘Blue Fortune’. Each of the Anise Hyssop Hybrids grows to a different height and has a different flower color. ‘Tutti Frutti’ grows 3 to 4 feet tall with raspberry-rose-pink tubular flowers. ‘Firebird’ grows 2 to 3 feet tall and produces copper-orange tubular flowers. ‘Apricot Sunrise’ grows 18 inches tall and bears orange-apricot tubular flowers. ‘Blue Fortune’ (shown here) grows 3 feet tall and produces an abundance of compressed, blue-purple, tubular flowers in the form of a flower spike. All selections bloom continuously from May to October, and are highly attractive to insects, hummingbirds, and butterflies. Their pungent foliage makes them undesirable to deer. Full sun and well-drained soils are required. Once established, the plants have an exceptional degree of drought tolerance.

39. Summer Snowflake Viburnum blooms continuously from spring to fall, then ends the growing season with bright red fruit and rich, wine-red fall leaves. Its vibrant, snow-white flowers are show-stoppers in the spring landscape. As spring blossoms fade and other plants begin their summer growth phase, Summer Snowflake Viburnum gears up for an encore, flowering repeatedly throughout the summer and fall. Use Summer Snowflake Viburnum as a single specimen or in groups of three to five plants. It grows smaller and is more compact than many other viburnums, reaching 4 to 8 feet tall at maturity. Few pests seem to bother Summer Snowflake Viburnum. Plant ‘Summer Snowflake’ in full sun or partial shade. Moist well-drained soils are essential. Be prepared to water this plant during periods of limited rainfall. Otherwise, leaf-scorching and a decline in bloom will occur. Summer Snowflake Viburnum blooms continuously from spring to fall, then ends the growing season with bright red fruit and rich, wine-red fall leaves. Its vibrant, snow-white flowers are show-stoppers in the spring landscape. As spring blossoms fade and other plants begin their summer growth phase, Summer Snowflake Viburnum gears up for an encore, flowering repeatedly throughout the summer and fall. Use Summer Snowflake Viburnum as a single specimen or in groups of three to five plants. It grows smaller and is more compact than many other viburnums, reaching 4 to 8 feet tall at maturity. Few pests seem to bother Summer Snowflake Viburnum. Plant ‘Summer Snowflake’ in full sun or partial shade. Moist well-drained soils are essential. Be prepared to water this plant during periods of limited rainfall. Otherwise, leaf-scorching and a decline in bloom will occur.

40. You don't have to live in a swamp to grow Bald Cypress. It is surprisingly adaptable to dry sites as well. Bald Cypress is a native American tree found in wetlands from Delaware to Florida and from Indiana to Texas. It is an ancient plant thought to be common when dinosaurs roamed the earth. Bald Cypress is a deciduous conifer. It is a tall, stately tree best used in large, open spaces, such as parks or large residential properties. The soft-textured, flat needles, are spirally arranged around the twigs. They emerge yellow-green in spring and turn bright green by summer, then bronze-orange in fall before dropping. As the tree ages, the bark becomes fibrous and turns reddish-brown. Male and female flowers are formed separately on the tree. The male flowers are drooping panicles, 4 to 5 inches long, while the female flowers are more compressed along the stems. Female flowers develop into round one-inch cones that turn brown in fall. Cypress knees seldom form on trees growing outside water. You don't have to live in a swamp to grow Bald Cypress. It is surprisingly adaptable to dry sites as well. Bald Cypress is a native American tree found in wetlands from Delaware to Florida and from Indiana to Texas. It is an ancient plant thought to be common when dinosaurs roamed the earth. Bald Cypress is a deciduous conifer. It is a tall, stately tree best used in large, open spaces, such as parks or large residential properties. The soft-textured, flat needles, are spirally arranged around the twigs. They emerge yellow-green in spring and turn bright green by summer, then bronze-orange in fall before dropping. As the tree ages, the bark becomes fibrous and turns reddish-brown. Male and female flowers are formed separately on the tree. The male flowers are drooping panicles, 4 to 5 inches long, while the female flowers are more compressed along the stems. Female flowers develop into round one-inch cones that turn brown in fall. Cypress knees seldom form on trees growing outside water.

41. Dragon Wing Begonia is a hybrid cross between angel wing begonia and wax begonia. It grows denser and larger than most angel wing types and has the heat tolerance of wax begonias. It grows fast and adapts well to landscape beds, large containers, and hanging baskets -- blooming non-stop from spring until fall. Dragon Wing Begonias average 12 to 15 inches tall and 15 to 18 inches wide. Leaves are wing-shaped, large, and dark glossy green. Plants tend to branch readily and fill out without pruning. Flowers shed naturally after bloom as new ones take their place, so plants appear neat and clean all summer. Dragon Wing Begonia does best in filtered shade. It makes a spectacular showing when combined with tropical plants having bold foliage, such as bananas, cannas, gingers and tibouchinas (Princess Flower). When frost threatens, Dragon Wing Begonias can be cut back, dug and repotted for indoor culture and over-wintering. Cuttings can be easily rooted.Dragon Wing Begonia is a hybrid cross between angel wing begonia and wax begonia. It grows denser and larger than most angel wing types and has the heat tolerance of wax begonias. It grows fast and adapts well to landscape beds, large containers, and hanging baskets -- blooming non-stop from spring until fall. Dragon Wing Begonias average 12 to 15 inches tall and 15 to 18 inches wide. Leaves are wing-shaped, large, and dark glossy green. Plants tend to branch readily and fill out without pruning. Flowers shed naturally after bloom as new ones take their place, so plants appear neat and clean all summer. Dragon Wing Begonia does best in filtered shade. It makes a spectacular showing when combined with tropical plants having bold foliage, such as bananas, cannas, gingers and tibouchinas (Princess Flower). When frost threatens, Dragon Wing Begonias can be cut back, dug and repotted for indoor culture and over-wintering. Cuttings can be easily rooted.

42. Heat and drought tolerance helped earn Georgia Blue Veronica a Gold Medal Award in 2005. Growing only 4 to 6 inches tall and 2 feet wide, this herbaceous perennial tends to hug the ground and remain compact. The small, finely toothed elliptical leaves are dark green in summer and turn burgundy-bronze in winter. Multitudes of blue flowers in spring are highly attractive to butterflies. When planted over bulbs, such as daffodils, Georgia Blue Veronica provides a dramatic color contrast and spectacular floral display. Although it's a vigorous grower and spreads by creeping rootstocks, it is not aggressive or invasive. When it reaches the limits of its growing area, it can be sheared back and easily maintained within a bed.Heat and drought tolerance helped earn Georgia Blue Veronica a Gold Medal Award in 2005. Growing only 4 to 6 inches tall and 2 feet wide, this herbaceous perennial tends to hug the ground and remain compact. The small, finely toothed elliptical leaves are dark green in summer and turn burgundy-bronze in winter. Multitudes of blue flowers in spring are highly attractive to butterflies. When planted over bulbs, such as daffodils, Georgia Blue Veronica provides a dramatic color contrast and spectacular floral display. Although it's a vigorous grower and spreads by creeping rootstocks, it is not aggressive or invasive. When it reaches the limits of its growing area, it can be sheared back and easily maintained within a bed.

43. Creeping Raspberry, Rubus pentalobus, thrives under harsh growing conditions. It will carpet ditches and slopes or cascade over a wall or container. It is a fast-growing, evergreen ground cover which creeps along by forming runners which root at their nodes and establish a new plant -- much like strawberries do. Although it’s aggressive it is not invasive. It doesn't climb trees or smother nearby shrubs, and it can readily be controlled with mechanical edging. The coarse-textured leaves have deep veins that make them appear puckered. During spring and summer, the leaves are shiny, dark green. They turn burgundy in fall and winter. White flowers appear in mid-summer, but they are lost in the foliage and are not very showy. The flowers are followed by tiny raspberry-like fruit. The fruit are edible but too small for harvesting. Creeping Raspberry prefers full sun to partial shade and well-drained soils. Avoid overhead irrigation because it will cause the plants to look ragged. Creeping Raspberry has excellent pest resistance and deer tolerance. Creeping Raspberry, Rubus pentalobus, thrives under harsh growing conditions. It will carpet ditches and slopes or cascade over a wall or container. It is a fast-growing, evergreen ground cover which creeps along by forming runners which root at their nodes and establish a new plant -- much like strawberries do. Although it’s aggressive it is not invasive. It doesn't climb trees or smother nearby shrubs, and it can readily be controlled with mechanical edging. The coarse-textured leaves have deep veins that make them appear puckered. During spring and summer, the leaves are shiny, dark green. They turn burgundy in fall and winter. White flowers appear in mid-summer, but they are lost in the foliage and are not very showy. The flowers are followed by tiny raspberry-like fruit. The fruit are edible but too small for harvesting. Creeping Raspberry prefers full sun to partial shade and well-drained soils. Avoid overhead irrigation because it will cause the plants to look ragged. Creeping Raspberry has excellent pest resistance and deer tolerance.

44. Three colorful, long-blooming, low-maintenance Cuphea species and selections are available to fill a variety of roles in your garden. They love the sun, tolerate heat and humidity, and attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Cuphea ignea, ‘Firecracker’, the aptly named Firecracker Plant (pictured here) grows about a foot tall and sparkles in containers or window boxes or in front of taller plants in a perennial border. Cuphea llavea, (not shown) commonly called Mickey Mouse Plant, Tiny Mice, or Georgia Scarlet, adds a touch of whimsy with its hundreds of blossoms that resemble mouse faces. The bushy, compact plant grows to about 2 feet tall and will add interest to containers or ground beds. Summer cuttings root readily. Cuphea micropetala (not shown) is the tallest of the three Cupheas, reaching 3 to 5 feet in height. Its common name is Tall Cigar Plant, and it makes a great background plant for perennial borders. If cut back, mulched and protected during mild winters, it may be a perennial in the warmer parts of Georgia. Three colorful, long-blooming, low-maintenance Cuphea species and selections are available to fill a variety of roles in your garden. They love the sun, tolerate heat and humidity, and attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Cuphea ignea, ‘Firecracker’, the aptly named Firecracker Plant (pictured here) grows about a foot tall and sparkles in containers or window boxes or in front of taller plants in a perennial border. Cuphea llavea, (not shown) commonly called Mickey Mouse Plant, Tiny Mice, or Georgia Scarlet, adds a touch of whimsy with its hundreds of blossoms that resemble mouse faces. The bushy, compact plant grows to about 2 feet tall and will add interest to containers or ground beds. Summer cuttings root readily. Cuphea micropetala (not shown) is the tallest of the three Cupheas, reaching 3 to 5 feet in height. Its common name is Tall Cigar Plant, and it makes a great background plant for perennial borders. If cut back, mulched and protected during mild winters, it may be a perennial in the warmer parts of Georgia.

45. Perennial Plumbago. The shiny green leaves of this durable groundcover appear in late spring. Bright blue flowers begin to emerge in late summer and keep coming until frost. The leaves turn bronze red in fall and the plant dies back in winter. Just 6 to 10 inches tall, Perennial Plumbago is a good choice for filling spaces between shrubs, creeping over rocks in a rock garden, adding a splash of blue to the perennial border, or spilling over walls. It’s excellent for interplanting with spring flowering bulbs, because it will be greening up as the bulb foliage is dying back. Perennial Plumbago. The shiny green leaves of this durable groundcover appear in late spring. Bright blue flowers begin to emerge in late summer and keep coming until frost. The leaves turn bronze red in fall and the plant dies back in winter. Just 6 to 10 inches tall, Perennial Plumbago is a good choice for filling spaces between shrubs, creeping over rocks in a rock garden, adding a splash of blue to the perennial border, or spilling over walls. It’s excellent for interplanting with spring flowering bulbs, because it will be greening up as the bulb foliage is dying back.

46. This is a wisteria you can control. It’s less invasive then the Asian wisterias, and it begins flowering at one year of age, rather than 10 or more years like its Asian relatives. The flowers are fragrant, lavender-blue, and seem to cascade from the foliage like a waterfall – hence the name, ‘Amethyst Falls’. Though a little smaller than the Asian types, ‘Amethyst Falls’ can climb to 20 to 30 feet to cover pergolas, trellises, or fences. With some staking, tying, and pruning, it also can be trained as a free-standing tree form. Deer and drought tolerance are other attributes that earned this plant a Gold Medal Award in 2006. This is a wisteria you can control. It’s less invasive then the Asian wisterias, and it begins flowering at one year of age, rather than 10 or more years like its Asian relatives. The flowers are fragrant, lavender-blue, and seem to cascade from the foliage like a waterfall – hence the name, ‘Amethyst Falls’. Though a little smaller than the Asian types, ‘Amethyst Falls’ can climb to 20 to 30 feet to cover pergolas, trellises, or fences. With some staking, tying, and pruning, it also can be trained as a free-standing tree form. Deer and drought tolerance are other attributes that earned this plant a Gold Medal Award in 2006.

47. Chinese Snowball Viburnum is a large shrub, growing 10 to 15 feet tall, which looks best when planted as a background plant in the perennial border or woodland garden. Its showy snowball-like flower clusters in April and May make it a focal point of the springtime landscape. The flowers emerge green, turn a dazzling white, and eventually fade to light brown. Sometimes a second bloom flush occurs in late summer. The flowers are commonly cut and used, both fresh and dried, in floral arrangements.Chinese Snowball Viburnum is a large shrub, growing 10 to 15 feet tall, which looks best when planted as a background plant in the perennial border or woodland garden. Its showy snowball-like flower clusters in April and May make it a focal point of the springtime landscape. The flowers emerge green, turn a dazzling white, and eventually fade to light brown. Sometimes a second bloom flush occurs in late summer. The flowers are commonly cut and used, both fresh and dried, in floral arrangements.

48. Overcup Oak, Quercus lyrata, is a fast growing, long-lived, native tree suitable for large landscapes. Under cultivation it typically grows 50 feet high and 50 feet wide. In the wild it may reach 125 feet. Overcup Oak adapts to a wide range of soils and growing environments, including heavy, compacted soils and the heat and humidity of the South. Its name comes from the unique shape of its acorns, with their warty caps that almost completely surround the nut. Other common names for this species are swamp post oak, swamp white oak, and water white oak. Overcup Oak, Quercus lyrata, is a fast growing, long-lived, native tree suitable for large landscapes. Under cultivation it typically grows 50 feet high and 50 feet wide. In the wild it may reach 125 feet. Overcup Oak adapts to a wide range of soils and growing environments, including heavy, compacted soils and the heat and humidity of the South. Its name comes from the unique shape of its acorns, with their warty caps that almost completely surround the nut. Other common names for this species are swamp post oak, swamp white oak, and water white oak.

49. Firespike is a large, vigorous, shrub-like annual that will add a tropical look to the late summer landscape. The striking, upright panicles of crimson red flowers emerge in August and persist until the first frost. They produce a sweet nectar that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. Leaves are pest free, dark green, 2 to 3 inches wide, and up to 6 inches long, with wavy margins and long pointed tips. Firespike works well as a background plant in a mixed shrub border, or in a large container with other plants. To look its best, Firespike needs full sun to partial shade, moist, well-drained soil, and weekly applications of liquid fertilizer. Firespike can be propagated from softwood cuttings in the spring or from cuttings taken in fall and overwintered. Firespike is a large, vigorous, shrub-like annual that will add a tropical look to the late summer landscape. The striking, upright panicles of crimson red flowers emerge in August and persist until the first frost. They produce a sweet nectar that attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. Leaves are pest free, dark green, 2 to 3 inches wide, and up to 6 inches long, with wavy margins and long pointed tips. Firespike works well as a background plant in a mixed shrub border, or in a large container with other plants. To look its best, Firespike needs full sun to partial shade, moist, well-drained soil, and weekly applications of liquid fertilizer. Firespike can be propagated from softwood cuttings in the spring or from cuttings taken in fall and overwintered.

50. You don’t have to live in a swamp to enjoy Swamp Hibiscus. It will also do well in ordinary garden soil, if irrigated during periods of limited rainfall. It has striking scarlet flowers, 3 to 5 inches across, from late spring until frost. The plant grows upright, 5 to 6 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide, in a single season. Swamp Hibiscus is the solution for very moist, sunny sites that are rich in organic matter, such as water gardens, pond edges, and rain gardens. Some deadheading and pruning is advisable to encourage re-blooming. In North Georgia, the stems should be cut back to the ground in late winter to make room for new growth. Swamp Hibiscus is easily propagated by seed or cuttings. You don’t have to live in a swamp to enjoy Swamp Hibiscus. It will also do well in ordinary garden soil, if irrigated during periods of limited rainfall. It has striking scarlet flowers, 3 to 5 inches across, from late spring until frost. The plant grows upright, 5 to 6 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide, in a single season. Swamp Hibiscus is the solution for very moist, sunny sites that are rich in organic matter, such as water gardens, pond edges, and rain gardens. Some deadheading and pruning is advisable to encourage re-blooming. In North Georgia, the stems should be cut back to the ground in late winter to make room for new growth. Swamp Hibiscus is easily propagated by seed or cuttings.

51. With so many azaleas to choose from, Admiral Semmes Azalea had to be special to be selected as a Georgia Gold Medal winner. Its vibrant yellow flowers light up the spring landscape. In summer the lustrous, dark green foliage makes it a good background plant in a perennial border. Admiral Semmes Azalea grows 4 to 5 feet tall with an equal spread. The leaves turn orange bronze in fall, and then drop as the plant fades into the background in winter. The flowers have a pleasant fragrance and the plant is heat tolerant and mildew resistant. Admiral Semmes Azalea is the result of a cross between the large-flowered Exbury Azalea, ‘Hotspur Yellow’ and the native Florida azalea, Rhodedendron austrinum. Introduced by Dodd and Dodd Nurseries in Semmes, Alabama, it is named after the famous Confederate Admiral, Raphael Semmes. With so many azaleas to choose from, Admiral Semmes Azalea had to be special to be selected as a Georgia Gold Medal winner. Its vibrant yellow flowers light up the spring landscape. In summer the lustrous, dark green foliage makes it a good background plant in a perennial border. Admiral Semmes Azalea grows 4 to 5 feet tall with an equal spread. The leaves turn orange bronze in fall, and then drop as the plant fades into the background in winter. The flowers have a pleasant fragrance and the plant is heat tolerant and mildew resistant. Admiral Semmes Azalea is the result of a cross between the large-flowered Exbury Azalea, ‘Hotspur Yellow’ and the native Florida azalea, Rhodedendron austrinum. Introduced by Dodd and Dodd Nurseries in Semmes, Alabama, it is named after the famous Confederate Admiral, Raphael Semmes.

52. Madison Confederate Jasmine is a cold-hardy cultivar of an old Southern favorite. It’s a fast-growing, evergreen vine, reaching 20 feet at maturity. It does not have clinging aerial roots, so it climbs by twining around some supporting structure, such as an arbor. It can also be used as a low maintenance groundcover. Creamy white, five-pointed flowers emerge in spring, temporarily overshadowing the lush green foliage. Some summer pruning and training are necessary to keep the vine in bounds. Pests are not a problem. Madison Confederate Jasmine will grow well in moist to dry soils, but does not like wet feet. It needs full sun to partial shade.Madison Confederate Jasmine is a cold-hardy cultivar of an old Southern favorite. It’s a fast-growing, evergreen vine, reaching 20 feet at maturity. It does not have clinging aerial roots, so it climbs by twining around some supporting structure, such as an arbor. It can also be used as a low maintenance groundcover. Creamy white, five-pointed flowers emerge in spring, temporarily overshadowing the lush green foliage. Some summer pruning and training are necessary to keep the vine in bounds. Pests are not a problem. Madison Confederate Jasmine will grow well in moist to dry soils, but does not like wet feet. It needs full sun to partial shade.

53. Green Giant Arborvitae is a fast growing, evergreen, screen plant or specimen plant. It is an excellent pest resistant alternative to Leyland Cypress for screening or as a windbreak. It reaches 50 to 60 feet tall, so it’s best suited to large landscapes. However, if space is limited, plant it in the front yard as a living Christmas tree. The pyramidal form develops naturally, and the soft textured evergreen foliage makes it easy to hang Christmas lights. Green Giant Arborvitae can stand up to ice storms, wind, and even deer browsing. For a screen or windbreak, space plants 15 feet apart, in full sun. It is tolerant of most soil conditions, but will not do well in wet, poorly drained soils. Green Giant Arborvitae is a fast growing, evergreen, screen plant or specimen plant. It is an excellent pest resistant alternative to Leyland Cypress for screening or as a windbreak. It reaches 50 to 60 feet tall, so it’s best suited to large landscapes. However, if space is limited, plant it in the front yard as a living Christmas tree. The pyramidal form develops naturally, and the soft textured evergreen foliage makes it easy to hang Christmas lights. Green Giant Arborvitae can stand up to ice storms, wind, and even deer browsing. For a screen or windbreak, space plants 15 feet apart, in full sun. It is tolerant of most soil conditions, but will not do well in wet, poorly drained soils.

54. The Amazon Series of Dianthus barbatus is a dazzling update of an old fashioned favorite, Sweet William. Neon duo, Bouquet Purple, Neon Cherry, and Rose Magic are all well-named examples. The fragrant flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies. As cut flowers, they will last as long as two weeks in a vase. These are cool season annuals, to be planted in the fall for winter and spring color. All members of the Amazon series will do best in full sun and well-drained soil. They adapt well to containers. Fertilize at planting, in late winter, and in the spring. Pinch out faded blooms to maintain a neat appearance and encourage re-blooming.The Amazon Series of Dianthus barbatus is a dazzling update of an old fashioned favorite, Sweet William. Neon duo, Bouquet Purple, Neon Cherry, and Rose Magic are all well-named examples. The fragrant flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies. As cut flowers, they will last as long as two weeks in a vase. These are cool season annuals, to be planted in the fall for winter and spring color. All members of the Amazon series will do best in full sun and well-drained soil. They adapt well to containers. Fertilize at planting, in late winter, and in the spring. Pinch out faded blooms to maintain a neat appearance and encourage re-blooming.

55. Rozanne Cranesbill is a hardy, perennial geranium. It performs exceptionally well in the heat and humidity of the Southeast. Rozanne’s long bloom time and general toughness has made it a popular choice for perennial borders, rock gardens, or decorative containers. Rozanne will grow in a well rounded mound to a height of 18 to 20 inches. An abundance of 2 inch wide, blue-violet flowers will appear from late May until frost. The deeply lobed foliage turns a showy brownish red in fall. Plant Rozanne in well-drained, amended soil with full sun to light shade. A complete granular fertilizer at planting time and once or twice during the growing season will encourage vigorous growth. A light shearing in mid-summer will encourage new growth and more flowers for the fall landscape. After the first frost, cut back the plant and mulch it for the winter Rozanne Cranesbill is a hardy, perennial geranium. It performs exceptionally well in the heat and humidity of the Southeast. Rozanne’s long bloom time and general toughness has made it a popular choice for perennial borders, rock gardens, or decorative containers. Rozanne will grow in a well rounded mound to a height of 18 to 20 inches. An abundance of 2 inch wide, blue-violet flowers will appear from late May until frost. The deeply lobed foliage turns a showy brownish red in fall. Plant Rozanne in well-drained, amended soil with full sun to light shade. A complete granular fertilizer at planting time and once or twice during the growing season will encourage vigorous growth. A light shearing in mid-summer will encourage new growth and more flowers for the fall landscape. After the first frost, cut back the plant and mulch it for the winter

56. Pride of Augusta is a double flowered form of our native Carolina Jessamine. As a twining evergreen vine, it is ideal for disguising a fence, shading a patio, and cascading over large containers, or walls. The clusters of bright yellow, tubular flowers may appear from February to April, and sporadically throughout the growing season. This versatile vine will add low-maintenance, pest-free, deer resistant color and interest to the landscape Pride of Augusta Caroling Jessamine is not invasive. It grows to a manageable 10 to 20 feet in length. Lacking holdfasts or tendrils, it needs help climbing a support. Some nylon fishing line and occasional pruning can direct its growth to fit the situation. Pride of Augusta is a double flowered form of our native Carolina Jessamine. As a twining evergreen vine, it is ideal for disguising a fence, shading a patio, and cascading over large containers, or walls. The clusters of bright yellow, tubular flowers may appear from February to April, and sporadically throughout the growing season. This versatile vine will add low-maintenance, pest-free, deer resistant color and interest to the landscape Pride of Augusta Caroling Jessamine is not invasive. It grows to a manageable 10 to 20 feet in length. Lacking holdfasts or tendrils, it needs help climbing a support. Some nylon fishing line and occasional pruning can direct its growth to fit the situation.

57. Paperbush is a deciduous shrub that will enhance the mid-winter landscape with fragrance and visual drama. Emerging flower buds are revealed as the summer foliage sheds. The silvery buds expand into white flower clusters which open to a creamy yellow. Chocolate brown bark and dark, leafless stems provide an interesting contrast. The summer foliage of Paperbush is coarse textured, bluish green on top and silvery green below. It has a tropical look. Paperbush will reach a height of 4 to 6 feet in height and spread to 5 feet wide. Paperbush is a plant for filtered shade and moist, well-drained soil. It does not tolerate wet feet or drought Paperbush is a deciduous shrub that will enhance the mid-winter landscape with fragrance and visual drama. Emerging flower buds are revealed as the summer foliage sheds. The silvery buds expand into white flower clusters which open to a creamy yellow. Chocolate brown bark and dark, leafless stems provide an interesting contrast. The summer foliage of Paperbush is coarse textured, bluish green on top and silvery green below. It has a tropical look. Paperbush will reach a height of 4 to 6 feet in height and spread to 5 feet wide. Paperbush is a plant for filtered shade and moist, well-drained soil. It does not tolerate wet feet or drought

58. American Hornbeam’s outstanding adaptability is one reason it has been named a Georgia Gold Medal Winner. It grows in a variety of soils and climates, in sun to shade, from Nova Scotia to Florida, and west to Texas. Other names for American Hornbeam are Ironwood and Musclewood, which describe its very hard wood and smooth, ridged, slate-gray bark. As a specimen tree, American Hornbeam is a good alternative to Bradford Pear. At maturity it will be 30 to 40 feet high and 30 feet wide. Dense foliage casts cooling shade in summer and turns shades of yellow, orange, or red in fall. American Hornbeam can also be planted as a hedge or screen plant, and sheared into a formal, box-like shape.American Hornbeam’s outstanding adaptability is one reason it has been named a Georgia Gold Medal Winner. It grows in a variety of soils and climates, in sun to shade, from Nova Scotia to Florida, and west to Texas. Other names for American Hornbeam are Ironwood and Musclewood, which describe its very hard wood and smooth, ridged, slate-gray bark. As a specimen tree, American Hornbeam is a good alternative to Bradford Pear. At maturity it will be 30 to 40 feet high and 30 feet wide. Dense foliage casts cooling shade in summer and turns shades of yellow, orange, or red in fall. American Hornbeam can also be planted as a hedge or screen plant, and sheared into a formal, box-like shape.

59. The 2009 Georgia Gold Medal Annual, Summer Snapdragon, is an outstanding choice for a sunny landscape. A wide range of colors is available, including white, rose, lilac, violet and blue. Some cultivars have speckled or bicolor flowers. Flowering occurs over an 8 to 10 week period, peaking in June and July. The plants are attractive in patio containers, and the flower spikes hold up well in floral arrangements. Summer Snapdragon is heat and drought tolerant. It should be planted in full sun with well-drained soil. Set plants 12 inches apart. They have a bushy growth habit and will reach 12 to 18 inches in height. Apply a slow-release fertilizer at planting time. To ensure best performance, supplemental liquid fertilizer can be applied throughout the growing season. Let the plants dry out between waterings, but provide additional irrigation during dry spells. Summer Snapdragon can be grown from seed, summer tip cuttings, or division of the root mass. The 2009 Georgia Gold Medal Annual, Summer Snapdragon, is an outstanding choice for a sunny landscape. A wide range of colors is available, including white, rose, lilac, violet and blue. Some cultivars have speckled or bicolor flowers. Flowering occurs over an 8 to 10 week period, peaking in June and July. The plants are attractive in patio containers, and the flower spikes hold up well in floral arrangements. Summer Snapdragon is heat and drought tolerant. It should be planted in full sun with well-drained soil. Set plants 12 inches apart. They have a bushy growth habit and will reach 12 to 18 inches in height. Apply a slow-release fertilizer at planting time. To ensure best performance, supplemental liquid fertilizer can be applied throughout the growing season. Let the plants dry out between waterings, but provide additional irrigation during dry spells. Summer Snapdragon can be grown from seed, summer tip cuttings, or division of the root mass.

60. Arkansas Blue Star has just recently become widely available in the nursery trade. Gardeners will want to use it in rock gardens, perennial borders, or meadows. Arkansas Blue Star sends up feathery green leaves in the spring. Star-shaped flowers are borne along the upper portions of the stem and persist 3 to 4 weeks. The plant is most spectacular in the fall, when the foliage turns brilliant golden yellow that enhances the appearance of other plants in the landscape. This is a clumping herbaceous perennial that will reach 3 feet high and wide. Once established, it is drought tolerant and low maintenance. It is also deer tolerant – a feature many gardeners will appreciate. Arkansas Blue Star has just recently become widely available in the nursery trade. Gardeners will want to use it in rock gardens, perennial borders, or meadows. Arkansas Blue Star sends up feathery green leaves in the spring. Star-shaped flowers are borne along the upper portions of the stem and persist 3 to 4 weeks. The plant is most spectacular in the fall, when the foliage turns brilliant golden yellow that enhances the appearance of other plants in the landscape. This is a clumping herbaceous perennial that will reach 3 feet high and wide. Once established, it is drought tolerant and low maintenance. It is also deer tolerant – a feature many gardeners will appreciate.

61. Armand Clematis is a a very useful and attractive vine for fences, arbors, trellises, or walls.. In addition, it bears fragrant, white, star-shaped flowers in the early spring (March in Athens, earlier farther south). The glossy, evergreen leaves are about 3 inches long and 1 to 2 ½ inches wide. Unlike wisteria, confederate jasmine, or Carolina jessamine, Armand Clematis can be kept in bounds by light pruning after flowering and an occasional snip or two during the growing season. It flowers on the previous season's growth, so do not prune after mid-July. Plant Armand Clematis in moist, well-drained soils in full sun to partial shade. It will require additional moisture during periods of limited rainfall. Although it can be grown in most of Georgia, except the extreme north, winter protection is advisable when temperatures dip into the low teens. Armand Clematis is a a very useful and attractive vine for fences, arbors, trellises, or walls.. In addition, it bears fragrant, white, star-shaped flowers in the early spring (March in Athens, earlier farther south). The glossy, evergreen leaves are about 3 inches long and 1 to 2 ½ inches wide. Unlike wisteria, confederate jasmine, or Carolina jessamine, Armand Clematis can be kept in bounds by light pruning after flowering and an occasional snip or two during the growing season. It flowers on the previous season's growth, so do not prune after mid-July. Plant Armand Clematis in moist, well-drained soils in full sun to partial shade. It will require additional moisture during periods of limited rainfall. Although it can be grown in most of Georgia, except the extreme north, winter protection is advisable when temperatures dip into the low teens.

62. Fragrant Tea Olive is a tough, evergreen, low-maintenance plant with few pest problems. Its flowers are hidden among the leaves, but make their presence known when their sweet perfume becomes noticeable in September and October. This is a large shrub which will reach 20 to 30 feet in height. It is best used as a background plant in a perennial border, as a specimen plant, or as an evergreen hedge. It can easily be trained into a tree form. Several cultivars are available, including 'Apricot Gold' and 'Butter Yellow'. In the north Georgia mountains, where temperatures can dip into the single digits, Fortune's Tea Olive (Osmanthus x fortunei) is a better choice. Fertilize in early spring with a complete fertilizer containing slow-release nitrogen. Azalea/camellia fertilizer can also be used.Fragrant Tea Olive is a tough, evergreen, low-maintenance plant with few pest problems. Its flowers are hidden among the leaves, but make their presence known when their sweet perfume becomes noticeable in September and October. This is a large shrub which will reach 20 to 30 feet in height. It is best used as a background plant in a perennial border, as a specimen plant, or as an evergreen hedge. It can easily be trained into a tree form. Several cultivars are available, including 'Apricot Gold' and 'Butter Yellow'. In the north Georgia mountains, where temperatures can dip into the single digits, Fortune's Tea Olive (Osmanthus x fortunei) is a better choice. Fertilize in early spring with a complete fertilizer containing slow-release nitrogen. Azalea/camellia fertilizer can also be used.

63. Lavender Twist Redbud is a unique form of the familiar native redbud. It is patented and grown by licensed growers via grafting onto a rootstock. Lavender Twist Redbud grows slowly but will reach up to 15 feet tall and wide. It provides year round interest, beginning in the spring when its lavender flowers seem to cascade down along the weeping branches. The summer's leaves give the tree an umbrella-like form. In winter, the zig-zag branches, persistent seed pods and contorted trunk make it a living sculpture. Plant Lavender Twist Redbud in moist, well-drained soil. Full sun to part shade is recommended. Some staking and training is required to achieve a more upright form.Lavender Twist Redbud is a unique form of the familiar native redbud. It is patented and grown by licensed growers via grafting onto a rootstock. Lavender Twist Redbud grows slowly but will reach up to 15 feet tall and wide. It provides year round interest, beginning in the spring when its lavender flowers seem to cascade down along the weeping branches. The summer's leaves give the tree an umbrella-like form. In winter, the zig-zag branches, persistent seed pods and contorted trunk make it a living sculpture. Plant Lavender Twist Redbud in moist, well-drained soil. Full sun to part shade is recommended. Some staking and training is required to achieve a more upright form.

64. Additional cultural requirements for these and other Georgia Gold Medal Winners can be found on the following web site. The State Botanical Garden of Georgia is now the headquarters for the Georgia Gold Medal Program, coordinating plant nominations and publicity. Additional cultural requirements for these and other Georgia Gold Medal Winners can be found on the following web site. The State Botanical Garden of Georgia is now the headquarters for the Georgia Gold Medal Program, coordinating plant nominations and publicity.

65. Look for Georgia Gold Medal Winners in your local garden centers and nurseries. The proven qualities of these outstanding plants will make them a winner in your landscape. Look for Georgia Gold Medal Winners in your local garden centers and nurseries. The proven qualities of these outstanding plants will make them a winner in your landscape.

66. Credit slide. Acknowledgement is made to Dr. Michael Dirr, Dr. Allan Armitage, and Dr. James Midcap, Department of Horticulture, The University of Georgia; and Ball Seed Company for providing illustrations for this presentation.Credit slide. Acknowledgement is made to Dr. Michael Dirr, Dr. Allan Armitage, and Dr. James Midcap, Department of Horticulture, The University of Georgia; and Ball Seed Company for providing illustrations for this presentation.

  • Login