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ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ALGORITHMS. UNIT-IV. CHAPTER 8:. DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING. OUTLINE. Dynamic Programming Computing a Binomial Coefficient Warshall’s Algorithm for computing the transitive closure of a digraph Floyd’s Algorithm for the All-Pairs Shortest-Paths Problem

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Unit iv

ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF ALGORITHMS

UNIT-IV

CHAPTER 8:

DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING


Outline
OUTLINE

  • Dynamic Programming

    • Computing a Binomial Coefficient

    • Warshall’s Algorithm for computing the transitive closure of a digraph

    • Floyd’s Algorithm for the All-Pairs Shortest-Paths Problem

    • The Knapsack Problem and Memory Functions


Introduction
Introduction

Dynamic programming is an algorithm design technique which was invented by a prominent U. S. mathematician, Richard Bellman, in the 1950s.

Dynamic programming is a technique for solving problems with overlapping sub-problems.

Typically, these sub-problems arise from a recurrence relating a solution to a given problem with solutions to its smaller sub-problems of the same type.

Rather than solving overlapping sub-problems again and again,

dynamic programming suggests solving each of the smaller sub-problems only once and recording the results in a table from which we can then obtain a solution to the original problem.


Introduction1
Introduction

The Fibonacci numbers are the elements of the sequence

0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, . . . ,

Algorithm fib(n)

if n = 0 or n = 1 return n

return fib(n − 1) + fib(n − 2)

The original problem F(n) is defined by F(n-1) and F(n-2)

If we try to use recurrence directly to compute the nth Fibonacci

number F(n) , we would have to recompute the same values of this function many times.

In fact, we can avoid using an extra array to accomplish this task by recording the values of just the last two elements of the Fibonacci sequence


Introduction2
Introduction

Notice that if we call, say, fib(5), we produce a call tree that calls the function on the same value many different times:

fib(5)

fib(4) + fib(3)

(fib(3) + fib(2)) + (fib(2) + fib(1))

((fib(2) + fib(1)) + (fib(1) + fib(0))) + ((fib(1) + fib(0)) + fib(1))

(((fib(1) + fib(0)) + fib(1)) + (fib(1) + fib(0))) + ((fib(1) + fib(0)) + fib(1))

If we try to use recurrence directly to compute the nth Fibonacci number F(n), we would have to recompute the same values of this function many times.


Introduction3
Introduction

Dynamic programming usually takes one of two approaches:

Bottom-up approach: All subproblems that might be needed are solved in advance and then used to build up solutions to larger problems. This approach is slightly better in stack space and number of function calls, but it is sometimes not intuitive to figure out all the subproblems needed for solving the given problem.

Top-down approach: The problem is broken into subproblems, and these subproblems are solved and the solutions are remembered, in case they need to be solved again. This is recursion and Memory Function combined together.


Computing binomial coefficient
COMPUTING BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT

  • Binomial coefficient, denoted as C(n, k) is the number of combinations (subsets) of k elements from an n-element set (0 ≤ k ≤ n).

  • The name “binomial coefficients” comes from the participation of these numbers in the binomial formula:

    (a + b)n = C(n, 0)an + . . . + C(n, k)an-kbk + . . . + C(n, n)bn.

  • Two important properties of binomial coefficients:

    • C(n, k) = C(n-1, k-1) + C(n-1, k) for n > k > 0 -------- (1)

    • C(n, 0) = C(n, n) = 1-------- (2)


Computing a binomial coefficient
COMPUTING A BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT

  • The nature of recurrence (1), which expresses the problem of computing C(n, k) in terms of the smaller and overlapping problems of computing C(n-1, k-1) and C(n-1, k), lends itself to solving by the dynamic programming technique.

  • To do this, we record the values of the binomial coefficients in a table of n+1 rows and k+1 columns, numbered from 0 to n and from 0 to k, respectively.

  • To compute C(n, k), we fill the table row by row, starting with row0 and ending with row n.


Computing a binomial coefficient1
COMPUTING A BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT

  • Row 0 through k also end with 1 on the table’s main diagonal:

    C(i, j) = 1 for 0 ≤ i ≤ k.

  • The other entries are computed using the formula

    C(i, j) = C(i-1, j-1) + C(i-1, j)

    i.e., by adding the contents of the cells in the preceding row and the previous column and in the preceding row and the same column.

    0 1 2 . . . k - 1 k

    01

    1 1 1

    21 2 1

    . . . .

    k1 1

    .. . .

    n-11 C(n-1, k-1) C(n-1, k)

    n 1 C(n, k)

Figure: Table for computing binomial coefficient C(n, k) by dynamic programming algorithm.


Computing a binomial coefficient2
COMPUTING A BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT

Example:Compute C(6, 3) using dynamic programming.

j

0 1 2 3

01

11 1

2 1 2 1

i3 1 3 3 1

41 4 6 4

51 5 10 10

6 1 6 15 20

C(2, 1) = C(1,0) + C(1,1) = 1+1 = 2 C(5, 1) = C(4,0) + C(4,1) = 1+4 = 5

C(3, 1) = C(2,0) + C(2,1) = 1+2 = 3 C(5, 2) = C(4,1) + C(4,2) = 4+6 = 10

C(3, 2) = C(2,1) + C(2,2) = 2+1 = 3 C(5, 3) = C(4,2) + C(4,3) = 6+4 = 10

C(4, 1) = C(3,0) + C(3,1) = 1+3 = 4 C(6, 1) = C(5,0) + C(5,1) = 1+5 = 6

C(4, 2) = C(3,1) + C(3,2) = 3+3 = 6 C(6, 2) = C(5,1) + C(5,2) = 5+10 = 15

C(4, 3) = C(3,2) + C(3,3) = 3+1 = 4 C(6, 3) = C(5,2) + C(5,3) = 10+10 = 20


Computing a binomial coefficient3
COMPUTING A BINOMIAL COEFFICIENT

ALGORITHMBinomial(n, k)

//Computes C(n, k) by the dynamic programming algorithm

//Input: A pair of nonnegative integer n ≥ k ≥ 0

//Output: The value of C(n, k)

for i ← 0 to n do

for j ← 0 to min(i, k) do

if j = 0 or j = i

C[i, j] ← 1

else C[i, j] ← C[i - 1, j - 1] + C[i - 1, j]

return C[n, k]


Time efficiency of binomial coefficient algorithm
Time Efficiency of Binomial Coefficient Algorithm

  • The basic operation for this algorithm is addition.

  • Because the first k + 1 rows of the table form a triangle

    while the remaining n – k rowsform a rectangle, we have to split the sum expressing A(n, k) into two parts:

    k i-1 n k k n

    A(n, k) = ∑ ∑ 1 + ∑ ∑ 1 = ∑ (i-1) + ∑ k

    i=1 j=1 i=k+1 j=1 i=1 i=k+1

    = (k – 1)k + k (n – k) ЄΘ(nk).

    2


Warshall s algorithm
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

  • Warshall’s algorithm is a well-known algorithm for computing the transitive closure (path matrix) of a directed graph.

  • Definition of a transitive closure:The transitive closure of a directed graph with n vertices can be defined as the n-by-n boolean matrix T = {tij}, in which the element in the ith row (1 ≤ i ≤ n) and the jth column (1 ≤ j ≤ n) is 1 if there exists a nontrivial directed path (i.e., a directed path of a positive length) from the ith vertex to the jth vertex; otherwise, tij is 0.

a b c d a b c d

a 0 1 0 0 a1 1 1 1

b 0 0 0 1b1 1 1 1

c 0 0 0 0 c0 0 0 0

d 1 0 1 0 d 1 1 1 1

a

b

A =

T =

c

d

(a) Digraph. (b) Its adjacency matrix. (c) Its transitive closure.


Warshall s algorithm1
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

  • Performing traversal (BFS or DFS) starting at the ith vertex gives the information about the vertices reachable from the ith vertex and hence the columns that contain ones in the ith row of the transitive closure.

  • It is called Warshall’s algorithm after S. Warshall.

  • Warshall’s algorithm constructs the transitive closure of a given digraph with n vertices through a series of n-by-n boolean matrices:

    R(0) , . . . , R(k – 1) , R(k) , . . . ,R(n) . ----------- (1)

  • Each of these matrices provide certain information about directed paths in the digraph. Specifically, the element rij(k) in the ith row and jth column of matrix R(k) (k=0, 1, . . . ,n) is equal to 1 if and only if there exists a directed path from the ith vertex to the jth vertex with each intermediate vertex if any, numbered not higher than k.


Warshall s algorithm2
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

  • The series starts with R(0) , which does not allow any intermediate vertices in its path; hence, R(0) is nothing else but the adjacency matrix of the graph.

  • R(1) contains the information about paths that can use the first vertex as intermediate; so, it may contain more ones than R(0) .

  • In general, each subsequent matrix in series (1) has one more vertex to use as intermediate for its path than its predecessor.

  • The last matrix in the series, R(n) , reflects paths that can use all n vertices of the digraph as intermediate and hence is nothing else but the digraph’s transitive closure.


Warshall s algorithm3
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

  • The central point of the algorithm is that we can compute all the elements of each matrix R(k) from its immediate predecessor R(k-1) in series (1).

  • Let rij (k) , the element in the ith row and jth column of matrix R (k) , be equal to 1. This means that there exists a path from the ith vertex vi to the jth vertex vj with each intermediate vertex numbered not higher than k:

    vi, a list of intermediate vertices each numbered not higher than k, vj –-(2)

  • Two situations regarding this path are possible.

    • In the first, the list of intermediate vertices does not contain the kth vertex. Then this path from vi to vj has intermediate vertices numbered not higher than k-1, and therefore rij (k-1) is equal to 1 as well.

    • The second possibility is that path (2) contain the kth vertex vk among intermediate vertices.


Warshall s algorithm4
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

  • The path (2) can be rewritten as follows:

    vi, vertices numbered ≤ k-1, vk, vertices numbered ≤ k-1, vj

  • The first part of this representation means that there exists a path from vi to vk with each intermediate vertex numbered not higher than k-1 (hence rik(k-1) = 1), and the second part means that there exists a path from vk to vj with each intermediate vertex numbered not higher than k-1 (hence rkj(k-1) = 1).


Warshall s algorithm5
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

  • If rij (k) = 1, then either rij(k-1) =1 or both rik(k-1) =1 and rkj(k-1) =1. Thus, we have the following formula for generating the elements of matrix R (k) from the elements of matrix R (k-1) :

    rij(k) = rij(k-1) or (rik(k-1) and rkj(k-1) ). ------------------ (3)

  • This formula implies the following rule for generating elements of matrix R (k) from elements of matrix R (k-1) :

    • If an element rij is 1 in R (k-1) , it remains 1 in R (k) .

    • If an element rij is 0 in R (k-1) , it has to be changed to 1 in R (k) if and only if the element in its row i and column k and the element in its column j and row k are both 1’s in R (k-1) .

j k j k

k 1 k 1

i 0 1 i 1 1

R (k-1) =

R (k) =


Warshall s algorithm6
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

a b c d

a 0 1 0 0

b 0 0 0 1

c 0 0 0 0

d 1 0 1 0

a

b

Ones reflect the existence of paths with no intermediate vertices (R(0) is just the adjacency matrix); boxed row and column are used for getting R(1) .

R(0) =

c

d

a b c d

a 0 1 0 0

b 0 0 0 1

c 0 0 0 0

d 1 1 1 0

Ones reflect the existence of paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 1. i.e., just vertex a (note a new path from d to b); boxed row and column are used for getting R(2) .

R(1) =

Figure: Application of Warshall’s algorithm to the digraph

shown. New ones are in bold.


Warshall s algorithm7
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

a b c d

a 0 1 0 1

b 0 0 0 1

c 0 0 0 0

d 1 1 1 1

a

b

Ones reflect the existence of paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 2. i.e., a and b (note two new paths); boxed row and column are used for getting R(3) .

R(2) =

c

d

a b c d

a 0 1 0 1

b 0 0 0 1

c 0 0 0 0

d 1 1 1 1

Ones reflect the existence of paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 3. i.e., a, b and c (no new paths); boxed row and column are used for getting R(4) .

R(3) =

Figure: Application of Warshall’s algorithm to the digraph

shown. New ones are in bold.


Warshall s algorithm8
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

a

b

c

d

a b c d

a1 1 1 1

b1 1 1 1

c 0 0 0 0

d 1 1 1 1

Ones reflect the existence of paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 4. i.e., a, b, c, and d (note five new paths) .

R(4) =

Figure: Application of Warshall’s algorithm to the digraph

shown. New ones are in bold.


Warshall s algorithm9
WARSHALL’S ALGORITHM

ALGORITHM Warshall(A[1...n, 1…n])

//Implements Warshall’s algorithm for computing the

//transitive closure

//Input: The adjacency matrix A of a digraph with n vertices

//Output: The transitive closure of the digraph

R(0) ← A

for k ← 1 to n do

for i ← 1 to n do

for j ← 1 to n do

R(k)[i, j] ← R(k-1)[i, j] or (R(k-1)[i, k] and R(k-1)[k, j])

return R(n)

Note:The time efficiency of Warshall’s algorithm is Θ(n3)


Floyd s algorithm
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

  • Given a weighted connected graph (undirected or directed), the all-pairs shortest-paths problem asks to find the distance (lengths of the shortest paths) from each vertex to all other vertices.

  • The Distance matrix D is an n-by-n matrix in which the lengths of shortest paths is recorded; the element dij in the ith row and the jth column of this matrix indicates the length of the shortest path from the ith vertex to the jth vertex (1 ≤ i, j ≤ n).

2

a b c d a b c d

a 0 ∞ 3 ∞ a0 10 3 4

b 2 0 ∞ ∞b2 0 5 6

c ∞ 7 0 1 c7 7 0 1

d 6 ∞ ∞ 0 d 6 16 9 0

a

b

6

7

3

W =

D =

c

d

1

(a) Digraph. (b) Its weight matrix. (c) Its distance matrix.


Floyd s algorithm1
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

  • Floyd’s algorithm is a well-known algorithm for the all-pairs shortest-paths problem.

  • Floyd’s algorithm is named after its inventor R. Floyd.

  • It is applicable to both undirected and directed weighted graphs provided that they do not contain a cycle of a negative length.

  • Floyd’s algorithm computes the distance matrix of a weighted graph with n vertices through a series of n-by-n matrices:

    D(0) , . . . , D(k – 1) , D(k) , . . . ,D(n) . ----------- (1)

  • Each of these matrices contains the lengths of shortest paths with certain constraints on the paths considered for the matrix in question. Specifically, the element dij(k) in the ith row and jth column of matrix D(k) (k=0, 1, . . . ,n) is equal to the length of the shortest path among all paths from the ith vertex to the jth vertex with each intermediate vertex, if any, numbered not higher than k.


Floyd s algorithm2
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

  • The series starts with D(0) , which does not allow any intermediate vertices in its path; hence, D(0) is nothing but the weightmatrix of the graph.

  • The last matrix in the series, D(n) , contains the lengths of the shortest paths among all paths that can use all n vertices as intermediate and hence is nothing but the distance matrix being sought.

  • We can compute all the elements of each matrix D(k) from its immediate predecessor D(k-1) in series (1).

  • Let dij (k) , be the element in the ith row and jth column of matrix D(k). This means that dij(k) is equal to the length of the shortest path among all paths from the ith vertex vi to the jth vertex vj with their intermediate vertices numbered not higher than k:

    vi, a list of intermediate vertices each numbered not higher than k, vj –---(2)


Floyd s algorithm3
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

  • We can partition all such paths into two disjoint subsets: those that do not use the kth vertex vk as intermediate and those that do.

  • Since the paths of the first subset have their intermediate vertices numbered not higher than k-1, the shortest of them is of length dij(k-1) .

  • All paths of the second subset have the following form:

    vi, vertices numbered ≤ k-1, vk, vertices numbered ≤ k-1, vj

  • Each of the paths is made up of a path from vi to vk with each intermediate vertex numbered not higher than k-1 and a path from vk to vj with each intermediate vertex numbered not higher than k-1 .


Floyd s algorithm4
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

  • If the length of the shortest path from vi to vk among the paths that use intermediate vertices numbered not higher than k-1 is equal to dik(k-1) and the length of the shortest path from vk to vjamong the paths that use intermediate vertices numbered not higher than k-1 is equal dkj(k-1) , then the length of the shortest pathamong the paths that use kth vertex is equal to dik(k-1) + dkj(k-1) .

  • Taking into account the lengths of the shortest paths in both subsets leads to the following recurrence:

    dij(k) = min { dij(k-1) , dik(k-1) + dkj(k-1) } for k ≥ 1, dij(0) = wij

dij(k-1)

Vi

Vj

dik(k-1)

dkj(k-1)

Vk


Floyd s algorithm5
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

ALGORITHM Floyd(W[1...n, 1…n])

//Implements Floyd’s algorithm for the all-pairs shortest-

//paths problem

//Input: The weight matrix W of a graph with no negative

//length cycle

//Output: The distance matrix of the shortest paths’ lengths

D ← W // is not necessary if W can be overwritten

for k ← 1 to n do

for i ← 1 to n do

for j ← 1 to n do

D[i, j] ← min { D[i, j], D[i, k] + D[k, j] }

return D

Note:The time efficiency of Floyd’s algorithm is cubic i.e., Θ(n3)


Floyd s algorithm6
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

2

a b c d

a 0 ∞ 3 ∞

b 2 0 ∞ ∞

c ∞ 7 0 1

d 6 ∞ ∞ 0

a

b

Lengths of the shortest paths with no intermediate vertices (D(0) is simply the weight matrix); boxed row and column are used for getting D(1) .

6

3

7

D(0) =

c

d

1

a b c d

a 0 ∞ 3 ∞

b 2 0 5 ∞

c ∞ 7 0 1

d 6 ∞ 9 0

Lengths of the shortest paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 1, i.e., just a. (Note two new shortest paths from b to c and from d to c); boxed row and column are used for getting D(2) .

D(1) =

Figure: Application of Floyd’s algorithm to the digraph shown.

Updated elements are shown in bold.


Floyd s algorithm7
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

2

a b c d

a 0 ∞ 3 ∞

b 2 0 5 ∞

c 9 7 0 1

d 6 ∞ 9 0

a

b

Lengths of the shortest paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 2, i.e., a and b. (Note a new shortest path from c to a); boxed row and column are used for getting D(3) .

6

3

7

D(2) =

c

d

1

a b c d

a 0 10 3 4

b 2 0 5 6

c 9 7 0 1

d 6 16 9 0

Lengths of the shortest paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 3, i.e., a, b, and c. (Note four new shortest paths from a to b, from a to d, from b to d, and from d to b); boxed row and column are used for getting D(4) .

D(3) =

Figure: Application of Floyd’s algorithm to the digraph shown.

Updated elements are shown in bold.


Floyd s algorithm8
FLOYD’S ALGORITHM

2

a

b

6

3

7

c

d

1

a b c d

a 0 10 3 4

b 2 0 5 6

c7 7 0 1

d 6 16 9 0

Lengths of the shortest paths with intermediate vertices numbered not higher than 4, i.e., a, b, c, and d. (Note a new shortest path from c to a).

D(4) =

Figure: Application of Floyd’s algorithm to the digraph shown.

Updated elements are shown in bold.


Principle of optimality
PRINCIPLE OF OPTIMALITY

  • It is a general principle that underlines dynamic programming algorithms for optimization problems.

  • Richard Bellman called the principle as the principle of optimality.

  • It says that an optimal solution to any instance of an optimization problem is composed of optimal solutions to its subinstances.


The knapsack problem
THE KNAPSACK PROBLEM

Given a knapsack with maximum capacity W, and n items.

Each item i has some weight wi and value vi(all wi , viand W are positive integer values)

Problem: How to pack the knapsack to achieve maximum total value of packed items? i.e., find the most valuable subset of the items that fit into the knapsack.


Knapsack problem a picture
Knapsack problem:a picture

W = 20

Weight

value

vi

wi

Items

3

2

This is a knapsack

Max weight: W = 20

4

3

5

4

8

5

10

9


Knapsack problem
Knapsack problem

Problem, in other words, is to find

  • The problem is called a “0-1 Knapsackproblem“, because each item must be entirely accepted or rejected.

  • Just another version of this problem is the “Fractional Knapsack Problem”, where we can take fractions of items.


Knapsack problem brute force approach
Knapsack problem: brute-force approach

Since there are n items, there are 2n possible combinations of items.

We go through all combinations and find the one with the most total value and with total weight less or equal to W

Running time will be O(2n)


The knapsack problem1
The Knapsack Problem

To design a dynamic programming algorithm, we need to derive a recurrence relation that expresses a solution to an instance of the knapsack problem in terms of solutions to its smaller sub-instances.

Let us consider an instance defined by the first i items, 1 ≤ i ≤ n, with weights w1, . . . wi, values v1, . . . vi, and knapsack capacity j, 1 ≤ j ≤ W.

Let V[i, j] be the value of an optimal solution to this instance, i.e., the value of the most valuable subset of the first i items that fit into the knapsack of capacity j.

We can divide all the subsets of the first i items that fit the knapsack of capacity j into two categories: those that do not include the ith item and those that do.


The knapsack problem2
The Knapsack Problem

Note the following:

1. Among the subsets that do not include the ith item, the value of an

optimal subset is V[i-1, j].

2. Among the subsets that do include the ith item (hence, j-wi ≥ 0), an

optimal subset is made up of this item and an optimal subset of the

first i-1 items that fit into the knapsack of capacity j-wi. The value of

such an optimal subset is vi + V[i-1, j-wi].

Thus, the value of an optimal solution among all feasible subsets of the

first i items is the maximum of these two values.

If the ith item does not fit into the knapsack, the value of an optimal subset selected from the first i items is the same as the value of an optimal subset selected from the first i-1 items.


Knapsack problem1
KNAPSACK PROBLEM

  • These observations lead to the following recurrence:

    V[i, j] = 0 if i=0 or j=0

    V[i-1, j] if wi > j

    max{V[i-1], j], vi + V[i-1, j-wi]} if wi ≤ j

    Our goal is to find V[n, W], the maximal value of a subset of the n given items that fit into the knapsack of capacity W, and an optimal subset itself.


Knapsack problem2
KNAPSACK PROBLEM

  • Below figure illustrates the values involved in equations (1) and (2):

    0 j-wi j W

    0 0 0 0 0

    i-1 0 V[i-1, j-wi] V[i-1, j]

    wi, vi i 0 V[i, j]

    n 0 goal

    Figure:Table for solving the knapsack problem by dynamic programming.

  • For i, j > 0, to compute the entry in the ith row and the jth column, V[i, j], we compute the maximum of the entry in the previous row and the same column and the sum of vi and the entry in the previous row and wi columns to the left. The table can be filled either row by row or column by column.

i.e., V[i, j] = max{V[i-1], j], vi + V[i-1, j-wi]}


Example let us consider the instance given by the following data
Example : Let us consider the instance given by the following data

Build a Dynamic Programming Table for this Knapsack Problem

Capacity W = 5


Example dynamic programming table
Example – Dynamic Programming Table

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121

w2=1, v2= 102

w3=3, v3=203

w4=2, v4=154

Item

Entries for Row 0:

V[0, 0]= 0 since i and j values are 0

V[0, 1]=V[0, 2]=V[0, 3]=V[0,4]=V[0, 5]=0 Since i=0


Example dynamic programming table1
Example – Dynamic Programming Table

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102

w3=3, v3=203

w4=2, v4=154

Item

Entries for Row 1:

V[1, 0] = 0 since j=0

V[1, 1] = V[0, 1] = 0 (Here, V[i, j]= V[i-1, j] since wi > j)

V[1, 2] = max{V[0, 2], 12 + V[0, 0]} = max(0, 12) = 12(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[1, 3] = max{V[0, 3], 12 +V[0, 1]} = max(0, 12) = 12(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[1, 4] = max{V[0, 4], 12 + V[0, 2]} = max(0, 12) = 12(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[1, 5] = max{V[0, 5], 12 + V[0, 3]} = max(0, 12) = 12(Here, wi ≤ j)


Example dynamic programming table2
Example – Dynamic Programming Table

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102 0 10 12 22 22 22

w3=3, v3= 203

w4=2, v4= 154

Item

Entries for Row 2:

V[2, 0] = 0 since j = 0

V[2, 1] = max{V[1, 1], 10 + V[1, 0]} = max(0, 10) = 10(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[2, 2] = max{V[1, 2], 10 + V[1, 1]} = max(12, 10) = 12(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[2, 3] = max{V[1, 3], 10 +V[1, 2]} = max(12, 22) = 22(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[2, 4] = max{V[1, 4], 10 + V[1, 3]} = max(12, 22) = 22(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[2, 5] = max{V[1, 5], 10 + V[1, 4]} = max(12, 22) = 22(Here, wi ≤ j)


Example dynamic programming table3
Example – Dynamic Programming Table

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102 0 10 12 22 22 22

w3=3, v3= 203 0 10 12 22 30 32

w4=2, v4= 154

Item

Entries for Row 3:

V[3, 0] = 0 since j = 0

V[3, 1] = V[2, 1] = 10 (Here, V[i, j]= V[i-1, j] since wi > j)

V[3, 2] = V[2, 2] = 12 (Here, V[i, j]= V[i-1, j] since wi > j)

V[3, 3] = max{V[2, 3], 20 +V[2, 0]} = max(22, 20) = 22(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[3, 4] = max{V[2, 4], 20 + V[2, 1]} = max(22, 30) = 30(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[3, 5] = max{V[2, 5], 20 + V[2, 2]} = max(22, 32) = 32(Here, wi ≤ j)


Example dynamic programming table4
Example – Dynamic Programming Table

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102 0 10 12 22 22 22

w3=3, v3= 203 0 10 12 22 30 32

w4=2, v4= 154 0 10 15 25 30 37

Item

Entries for Row 4:

V[4, 0] = 0 since j = 0

V[4, 1] = V[3, 1] = 10 (Here, V[i, j]= V[i-1, j] since wi > j)

V[4, 2] = max{V[3, 2], 15 + V[3, 0]} = max(12, 15) = 15(Here, wi ≤ j)

V[4, 3] = max{V[3, 3], 15 +V[3, 1]} = max(22, 25) = 25 (Here, wi ≤ j)

V[4, 4] = max{V[3, 4], 15 + V[3, 2]} = max(30, 27) = 30 (Here, wi ≤ j)

V[4, 5] = max{V[3, 5], 15 + V[3, 3]} = max(32, 37) = 37(Here, wi ≤ j)


Example to find composition of optimal subset
Example: To find composition of optimal subset

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102 0 10 12 22 22 22

w3=3, v3= 203 0 10 12 22 30 32

w4=2, v4= 154 0 10 15 25 30 37

Item

  • Thus, the maximal value is V [4, 5]= $37. We can find the composition of an optimal subset by tracing back the computations of this entry in the table.

  • Since V [4, 5] is not equal to V [3, 5], item 4 was included in an optimal solution along with an optimal subset for filling 5 - 2 = 3 remaining units of the knapsack capacity.


Example to find composition of optimal subset1
Example: To find composition of optimal subset

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102 0 10 12 22 22 22

w3=3, v3= 203 0 10 12 22 30 32

w4=2, v4= 154 0 10 15 25 30 37

Item

  • The remaining is V[3, 3]

  • Here V[3, 3] = V[2, 3] so item 3 is not included

  • V[2, 3]  V[1, 3] so item 2 is included


Example
Example

Capacity

j

i 0 1 2 3 4 5

00 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=121 0 0 12 12 12 12

w2=1, v2= 102 0 10 12 22 22 22

w3=3, v3= 203 0 10 12 22 30 32

w4=2, v4= 154 0 10 15 25 30 37

Item

  • The remaining is V[1,2]

  • V[1, 2]  V[0, 2] so item 1 is included

  • The solution is {item 1, item 2, item 4}

  • Total weight is 5

  • Total value is 37


The knapsack problem3
The Knapsack Problem

The time efficiency and space efficiency of this algorithm are both in θ(nW).

The time needed to find the composition of an optimal solution is in O(n + W).


Memory function
Memory Function

The classic dynamic programming approach, fills a table with solutions to all smaller subproblems but each of them is solved only once.

An unsatisfying aspect of this approach is that solutions to some of these smaller subproblems are often not necessary for getting a solution to the problem given.

  • Since this drawback is not present in the top-down approach, it is natural to try to combine the strengths of the top-down and bottom-up approaches.

  • The goal is to get a method that solves only subproblems that are necessary and does it only once. Such a method exists; it is based on using memory functions


Defining a subproblem
Defining a Subproblem

w1 =2

v1 =3

w2 =3

v2 =4

w3 =4

v3 =5

w4 =5

v4 =8

w1 =2

v1 =3

w2 =4

v2 =5

w3 =5

v3 =8

w4 =9

v4 =10

Weight

Value

wi

vi

Item

#

1

2

3

Max weight: W = 20

For S4:

Total weight: 14;

total value: 20

S4

2

3

4

S5

3

4

5

4

5

8

5

9

10

Solution for S4 is not part of the solution for S5!!!

For S5:

Total weight: 20

total value: 26


Memory function1
Memory Function

Initially, all the table’s entries are initialized with a special “null” symbol to indicate that they have not yet been calculated.

Thereafter, whenever a new value needs to be calculated, the method checks the corresponding entry in the table first: if this entry is not “null,” it is simply retrieved from the table;

otherwise, it is computed by the recursive call whose result is then recorded in the table.



Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Let us consider the instance given by the following data:

Capacity W = 5


Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm1
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

Initial Table contents:

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 -1 -1 -1 -1 12

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[1, 5] is computed First:


Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm2
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 -1 -1 -1 1212

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[1, 4] is computed next:

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 -1 -1 -1 12 12

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 -1 -1 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[2, 5] is computed next:


Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm3
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 -1 12 -1 1212

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 -1 -1 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[1, 2] is computed next:

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 012 -1 12 12

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 -1 -1 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[1, 1] is computed next:


Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm4
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 012 -1 1212

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 12 -1 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[2, 2] is computed next:

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 012 -1 12 12

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 12 -1 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 32

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[3, 5] is computed next:


Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm5
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 012121212

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 12 -1 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 32

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[1, 3] is computed next:

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 0121212 12

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 1222 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 -1 -1 32

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[2, 3] is computed next:


Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm6
Example of solving an instance of the knapsack problem by the memory function algorithm

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 012121212

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 1222 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 22 -1 32

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

V[3, 3] is computed next:

Item Capacity j

i0 1 2 3 4 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

w1=2, v1=1210 0121212 12

w2=1, v2=1020 -1 1222 -1 22

w3=3, v3=2030 -1 -1 22 -1 32

w4=2, v4=154 0 -1 -1 -1 -1 37

V[4, 5] is computed next:


Memory function2
Memory Function the memory function algorithm

In general, we cannot expect more than a constant-factor gain in using the memory function method for the knapsack problem because its time efficiency class is the same as that of the bottom-up algorithm

A memory function method may be less space-efficient than a space efficient version of a bottom-up algorithm.


End of chapter 8
End of Chapter 8 the memory function algorithm


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