Examples of meters associated with poetic traditions
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Examples of meters associated with poetic traditions: . blank verse (unrhymed iambic pentameter): lofty, meditative verse rhymed couplets: satire triple meters: light, often humorous verse tetrameters : OE verse, songs (e.g . ballads), common meter (4/3 ), lots else. sonnets.

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Examples of meters associated with poetic traditions

Examples of meters associated with poetic traditions:

  • blank verse (unrhymed iambic pentameter): lofty, meditative verse

  • rhymed couplets: satire

  • triple meters: light, often humorous verse

  • tetrameters: OE verse, songs (e.g. ballads), common meter (4/3), lots else


Sonnets

sonnets

  • all traditional sonnets: 14 lines, iambic pentameter, strict rhyme scheme

  • 2 major types in English:

    • English (or Shakespearean)

    • Italian (or Petrarchan)

  • the main formal difference lies in their rhyme schemes


Examples of meters associated with poetic traditions

That time of year thou mayst in me behold 
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, 
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. 
In me thou seest the twilight of such day 
As after sunset fadeth in the west, 
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. 
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire 
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, 
As the death-bed whereon it must expire 
Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. 
   This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
   To love that well which thou must leave ere long.


Examples of meters associated with poetic traditions

Death be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think'stthou dost overthrow 

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.

From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,

Much pleasure; then from thee, much more must flow,

And soonest our best men with thee do go, 

Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery. 

Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,

And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell, 

And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well

And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,

And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.


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