Question Types for Analytical Reading of Informational Text
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 12

Question Types for Analytical Reading of Informational Text PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 67 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Question Types for Analytical Reading of Informational Text. What are the usual ingredients in informational text? . Side dishes : anecdotes cause/effect statements descriptions comparison/contrast embedded definitions examples metaphors. Meat of the Sandwich: Main idea. Bread:

Download Presentation

Question Types for Analytical Reading of Informational Text

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Question Types for Analytical Reading of Informational Text


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

What are the usual ingredients in informational text?

Side dishes:

anecdotes

cause/effect statements

descriptions

comparison/contrast

embedded definitions

examples

metaphors

Meat of the Sandwich:

Main idea

Bread:

Vocabulary

Condiments:

Cohesive devices:

conjunctions

relative pronouns

punctuation

Utensils:

What is referred to by

the pronouns?

What do the words

and phrases mean?

What is the organizing principle? (classification? narrative? process? problem/solution? description?)


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close (analytical) Reading:

  • Generic Questions for Informational Text: (In alphabetical order)

  • Main Idea: Is the main idea stated explicitly, or is it implied? Is it stated once

  • only, or more than once?

  • Other “ingredients” (aka details)

  • Anecdotes:Are there little “side stories” involving people that the author

  • includes to illustrate the main idea?

  • 2.Cause/effect statements: What, if any, statements in the text answer the

  • question “Why?”

  • 3.Comparison/contrast:What things, if any, are being compared and contrasted? What are the similarities and differences between these things?

  • 4.Descriptions:Are there any detailed descriptions in the text? Of what? What

  • words allow you to visualize the thing described?

  • 5.Embedded Definitions: What, if any, words or phrases are defined within the

  • text?


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close (analytical) Reading:

6. Examples: What, if any, examples, are given in the text? Examples for what?

7. Metaphor:Are there metaphors? If so, what do they mean?

8.Numbers & Statistics: If there are numbers and/or statistics, what do they refer to? How do they support the information?

Utensils:

Organization: What organizational system does the author use? Chronological?

Spatial? Order of importance? Story? Classification?

Pronoun Antecedents:Do we know the referents of all of the pronouns?

Vocabulary: Are there any key words in the text that are used in an unfamiliar

or unusual way? Does the reader have to “recalculate” the meaning of any

key words?


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Model

The South China Sea is part of the Pacific Ocean and is surrounded by China, Taiwan, and many countries of Southeast Asia. Because the sea

links the Pacific and Indian oceans, it is one of the world’s busiest shipping

lanes. The South China Sea is also an important region because of the

significant deposits of oil and natural gas that lie beneath its waters.

In addition, the South China Sea has one of the most diverse ecosystems

on Earth. In fact, according to environmental studies conducted in the Philippines,

the sea contains one-third of the world’s marine biodiversity. Tuna, mackerel,

anchovies, shrimp, and other fish are abundant. Seafood caught in the South

China Sea is the main source of protein for the millions of people living around the

sea.

In 2007, Chinese archaeologists watched as an 800-year-old ship was hauled

from the bottom of the South China Sea. It was loaded with 60,000 to

80,000 artifacts. Some researchers estimate that 2,000 ships lie at

the bottom of the South China Sea. However, dying coral reefs and

contaminated fish also lie underwater—the result of pollution.

“Water Resources”. National Geographic Global Issues. McGraw Hill.


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Model:

Stopping Points (Analysis through Cohesive Devices)

The South China Sea is part of the Pacific Ocean and is surrounded by China, Taiwan, and many countries of Southeast Asia. Because the sea

links the Pacific and Indian oceans,itis one of the world’s busiest shipping

lanes. The South China Sea is also an important region because of the

significant deposits of oil and natural gas that lie beneath itswaters.

In addition, the South China Sea has one of the most diverse ecosystems

on Earth. In fact, according to environmental studies conducted in the Philippines,

the sea contains one-third of the world’s marine biodiversity. Tuna, mackerel,

anchovies, shrimp, and other fish are abundant. Seafood caught in the South

China Sea is the main source of protein for the millions of people living around the

sea.

In 2007, Chinese archaeologists watched as an 800-year-old ship was hauled

from the bottom of the South China Sea. Itwas loaded with 60,000 to

80,000 artifacts. Some researchers estimate that 2,000 ships lie at

the bottom of the South China Sea. However, dying coral reefs and

contaminated fish also lie underwater— the result of pollution.

“Water Resources”. National Geographic Global Issues. McGraw Hill.


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Model: AWL Words

The South China Sea is part of the Pacific Ocean and is surrounded by China, Taiwan, and many countries of Southeast Asia. Because the sea

links the Pacific and Indian oceans, it is one of the world’s busiest shipping

lanes. The South China Sea is also an important region (2) because of the

significant (1) deposits of oil and natural gas that lie beneath its waters.

In addition, the South China Sea has one of the most diverse ecosystems

on Earth. In fact, according to environmental(1) studies conducted in the Philippines, the sea contains one-third of the world’s marine biodiversity. Tuna, mackerel, anchovies, shrimp, and other fish are abundant. Seafood caught in the South China Sea is the main source of protein for the millions of people living around the sea.

In 2007, Chinese archaeologists watched as an 800-year-old ship was hauled

from the bottom of the South China Sea. It was loaded with 60,000 to

80,000 artifacts. Some researchers (1) estimate (1) that 2,000 ships lie at

the bottom of the South China Sea. However, dying coral reefs and

contaminated fish also lie underwater—the resultof pollution.

“Water Resources”. National Geographic Global Issues. McGraw Hill.


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Model: “Ingredients”

The South China Sea is part of the Pacific Ocean

and is surrounded by China, Taiwan, and many countries

of Southeast Asia. Because the sea links the Pacific and Indian

oceans, it is one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes. The

South China Sea is also an important region because of the

significant deposits of oil and natural gas that lie beneath its waters.

In addition, the South China Sea has one of the most

diverse ecosystems on Earth. In fact, according to environmental

studies conducted in the Phillippines,the sea contains one-third

of the world’s marine biodiversity. Tuna, mackerel, anchovies,

shrimp, and other fish are abundant. Seafood caught in the South

China Sea is the main source of protein for the millions of people

living around the sea.

In 2007, Chinese archaeologists watched as an 800-year-old

ship was hauledfrom the bottom of the South China Sea. It was

loaded with 60,000 to 80,000 artifacts. Some researchers estimate

that 2,000 ships lie at the bottom of the South China Sea.

However, dying coral reefs and contaminated fish also lie

underwater—the result of pollution.

-anecdotes?

-cause & effect

statements?

-comparison/

contrast?

-descriptions?

-embedded

definitions?

-examples?

-metaphor?

-statistics?

“Water Resources”. National Geographic Global Issues. McGraw Hill.


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Mode: AWL Words:

Harmful Fishing Practices

Certain fishing practices are causing additional problem in

the South China Sea. Fish for food—as well as fish for aquariums—

are caught in the South China Sea using cyanide fishing. Fishermen spray a

poison called sodium cyanide into the water above coral reefs because reefs

are like underwater jungles where many species live. Since the poison is diluted

in the water, it usually doesn’t kill the fish. Instead it stuns the fish and allows the

fishermen to catch them. However, the poison weakens the fish. Many owners

of tropical aquariums oppose cyanide fishing because fish caught using that

method often die sooner than others.

Cyanide fishing can also harm coral reefs. The poison collects on the reefs and

kills them. Coral reefs are made from the skeletons of tiny marine animals, a

process that takes years. Scientists are worried that coral reefs around

the world are being killed by human activities more quickly than nature can

replace them. Coral reefs are important because they provide a home for many

different species of fish. They also supply food, jobs, and even sourcesof

medicines for millions of people.


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Mode: Stopping Points

(Analysis through Cohesive Devices)

Harmful Fishing Practices

Certain fishing practices are causing additional problems in

the South China Sea. Fish for food— as well as fish for aquariums—

are caught in the South China Sea using cyanide fishing. Fishermen spray a

poison called sodium cyanide into the water above coral reefs because reefs

are like underwater jungles where many species live. Since the poison is diluted

in the water, it usually doesn’t kill the fish. Instead it stuns the fish and allows the

fishermen to catch them. However, the poison weakens the fish. Many owners

of tropical aquariums oppose cyanide fishing because fish caught using that

method often die sooner than others.

Cyanide fishing can also harm coral reefs. The poison collects on the reefs and

kills them. Coral reefs are made from the skeletons of tiny marine animals, a process

that takes years. Scientists are worried that coral reefs around the world are being

killed by human activities more quickly than nature can replace them. Coral reefs

are important because they provide a home for many different species of fish. They

also supply food, jobs, and even sources of medicines for milliions of people.


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Mode: Content “ingredients”

Harmful Fishing Practices

Certain fishing practices are causing additional problem

in the South China Sea. Fish for food—as well as fish for

aquariums—are caught in the South China Sea using cyanide

fishing. Fishermen spray a poison called sodium cyanide into

the water above coral reefs because reefs are like underwater

jungles where many species live. Since the poison is diluted

in the water, it usually doesn’t kill the fish. Instead it stuns the

fish and allows the fishermen to catch them. However, the

poison weakens the fish. Many ownersof tropical aquariums

oppose cyanide fishing because fish caught using that

method often die sooner than others.

Cyanide fishing can also harm coral reefs. The poison

collects on the reefs and kills them. Coral reefs are made

from the skeletons of tiny marine animals, a process

that takes years. Scientists are worried that coral reefs

around the world are being killed by human activities more

quickly than nature can replace them. Coral reefs are

important because they provide a home for many different

species of fish. They also supply food, jobs, and even sources

of medicines for millions of people.

-anecdotes?

-cause & effect

statements?

-comparison/

contrast?

-descriptions?

-embedded

definitions?

-examples?

-metaphor?

-statistics?


Question types for analytical reading of informational text

Close Reading Mode: AWL Words:

Harmful Fishing Practices

Certain fishing practices are causing additional problem in

the South China Sea. Fish for food—as well as fish for aquariums—

are caught in the South China Sea using cyanide fishing. Fishermen spray a

poison called sodium cyanide into the water above coral reefs because reefs

are like underwater jungles where many species live. Since the poison is diluted

in the water, it usually doesn’t kill the fish. Instead it stuns the fish and allows the

fishermen to catch them. However, the poison weakens the fish. Many owners

of tropical aquariums oppose cyanide fishing because fish caught using that

method often die sooner than others.

Cyanide fishing can also harm coral reefs. The poison collects on the reefs and

kills them. Coral reefs are made from the skeletons of tiny marine animals, a

process (1) that takes years. Scientists are worried that coral reefs around

the world are being killed by human activities more quickly than nature can

replace them. Coral reefs are important because they provide a home for many

different species of fish. They also supply food, jobs, and even sources (1) of

medicines for millions of people.


  • Login