S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp
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S upportive E ducation for the R eturning V eteran Helping Ohio’s Best, Brightest and Bravest get their degree By John Schupp SERV Director, Cleveland State University. The Reality. 1,861,926 Deployed veterans since 9/11 257,582 Currently Deployed 1,342,272 Active Duty

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S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

Supportive Education for the Returning Veteran

Helping Ohio’s Best, Brightest and Bravest get their degree

By John Schupp

SERV Director, Cleveland State University


The reality

The Reality

1,861,926 Deployed veterans since 9/11

257,582 Currently Deployed

1,342,272 Active Duty

519,654 Guard/Reserve

Less than 1% of the population have protected the other 99%

288,952 veterans on America’s Campuses today

15% of total available- Less than 1 in 5 attend college!

If you find the right program, they will be on your campus

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Learning community for veterans

Learning Community for veterans

Basic Needs for a Learning Community Success

From The Cohort/Group…

Share common origin-

All military based experiences

Share common goal-

All want to finish the education mission

Be an Under-served demographic

Large % of GI Bill eligible veterans did not use their benefits

Have the potential to build group camaraderie

The Military has created this Camaraderie for the learning comm.

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

1985-1994 GI Bill eligible Vets

52,000 of 641,000 eligible veterans (8%) used all of GI Bill*

2008 GI Bill data

Less than 6%** use it completely

Avg less than 17 months used of 36 months eligible

Department of Education, 1995-2001***

30% of all College Freshmen get 4-yr degree in 5yrs or less

3% of College freshmenvets get 4-year degree in 5yrs or less

Veterans only have 36 months of GI Bill money

why the L.C. is needed

*http://chronicle.com ; Section: Students Volume 51, Issue 36, Page A31

**Keith Wilson, VA Education Secretary, ACE Summit Georgetown University Jun 6 2008

***The Soldier and the Student By Aaron Glantz in ‘The Nation’ November 27, 2007

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


They did use it at one time what worked back then

They did use it at one time, what worked back then?

Shows success of military ‘at risk’ group

Success was/is environment based

32%

20%

12%

9%

The Demography of U.S. Veterans: Changing Military Staffing Policy, Risk of Service, and Human Capital for Black and White Men, 1950 – 2000

Amy Kate Bailey, Department of Sociology, University of Washington West Coast Poverty Center Dissertation Fellow

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Reasons for low usage rate

Reasons for low usage rate

First Day walking onto the Campus-

Don’t know where to go, who to talk to

Registration

Admission requirements-may not qualify

Counseling

How ready are they for campus life

Financial

Up front costs, books, cost of living

Classes/Curriculum

Trying to fit in-dealing with the ‘freshmen question’

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


What the veteran brings home

What the veteran brings home

What the Soldier Brings Home

Heightened sensory awareness of sights, sounds & smells.

Identification and closeness with their military unit

Regimentation into highly structured and efficient routines.

Reconnecting with friends more difficult than expected.

Difficulties arise in trying to generate a “new normal”

Life at home/campus may not have the edge and adrenaline associated with wartime duty

These qualities insured survival during the war, but may not work in the classroom

SERV Proprietary and Confidential

Edgardo Padin-Rivera, Ph.D. Chair, PTSD Experts Workgroup Ohio VA Health Care NetworkChief, Psychology Service Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center


University transition solutions with

First day on campus

Personal walk-thru by other vets on campus

Paperwork

One contact handles Registrars, Admissions, Bursar,

Financial

Solved with new Post 9/11 GI Bill

Counseling

Bringing the VA to the campus

Classes-Transition to Civilian/Campus Life

Create a more ‘vet friendly’ environment in the classroom

Offer vets only sections of General Ed. Classes

University Transition Solutions with

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Focuses on their strengths

Focuses on their strengths

Military ‘at risk’ group

Individuals who have succeeded with

Goal Setting

Missions accomplished daily

Discipline

Takes Orders/direction

Respect for authority

Motivation

Volunteered to Serve their country

Self-Responsibility

Can survive on own

Does not blame others

Camaraderie

Generating success within their unit


Disability services focuses on their weaknesses

Disability Services focuses on their weaknesses

Typical ‘at risk’ group-weaknesses

Concentration in class

Individual based

Corrected by recording class lecture

Test Taking

Individual based

Corrected by taking test alone

Campus Facilities

Individual based

Corrected with campus maps, guides, etc

Trying to fit in

Individual based

Corrected with campus counseling

Military ‘at risk’ group-weaknesses

Concentration in class

Environment based

Corrected with

Test Taking

Environment based

Corrected with

Trying to fit in

Environment based

Corrected with

Finding a new ‘normal’

Individual based

Corrected with

Corrected with VA on campus

Dealing with adrenaline rush

Individual based

Corrected with VA on campus

Veterans will not be part of a program if it looks, smells, acts like it came from disability services


1 reason for low veteran success

Ability to concentrate when taking exams

Environment distractions very high

Concentration on questions very low

Exam scores are low-Grades drop-Vet drops out

How to improve concentration on exams

Minimize environmental distractions

Remove civilians from the environment

Guardian mode drops-Vets feel more comfortable

Memory/recall improves-Scores/Confidence Improves

#1 reason for Low Veteran Success

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


The civilian campus transition

the civilian/campus transition

Created Vets only ‘Gen Ed’ Sections as an option

English 101, Math 101, Science 101

Support for vets, not isolation

12 credit hrs (full time benefits) ‘vets only’ 1st semester

9 credit hrs, ‘vets only’ classes 2nd semester

Forced to take 3 more credit hrs in civilian classes

Track progress of Vets in the classes

Can watch/teach them as a group-

Confidence improves-Transition to civilian life improves

Civilian transition occurs slowly

While they are taking college credit classes

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Results 1 st semester spring 2008

-Results 1st Semester, Spring 2008

4 classes-

History 201, Chemistry 101 , Biology 106, Math 087

Chemistry difficult without the math background

The Students

Chemistry-14 started out

10 finished with C’s or better

2 had medical withdraws

1 had family withdraw

1 joined a fraternity……

Retention Rate

All ten went on to Summer 2008

71% freshmen retention rate-vs 72-77% avg for Ohio

No test anxiety reported on First exam in Chemistry

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Results 2 nd semester fall 2008

Results 2nd Semester Fall 2008

Four Classes, started with 25 different students total-

Had 85% attendance rates

Intro to Biology (BIO 106)

English 085 (Remedial)-Most Challenging-have to read, recall & comment

Math 087 (Remedial)

Intro to College Life (ASC 101)

Intro to Bio-

16 students initially-1 dropped, 1 failed, 14 have ‘C’ or better- 87.5%

English 085

12 students intially-2 failed,10 have Satisfactory grade- 83.3%

Math 087

10 students initially-9 have satisfactory grade – 90.0%

Intro to College Life

12 students initially- 11 have passed with ‘C’ or better- 91.7%

23 different students going on to Spring Semester- 92.0%

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Results 3 rd semester spring 2009

Results 3rd Semester Spring 2009

23 from Fall ‘08 taking Spring classes

18 new students for Spring 2009

Four Classes 41 different students total-

English 101-

15 students total, 8 new students

Intro to Psychology

12 students, 4 new

Intro to Chemistry and the lab

All have completed the math 088 course or math placement

26 students in both lab and lecture

37/41 students will go on to Summer/Fall 2009- 90%

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Vets enrolled in classes

vets enrolled in Classes

Fall 2009* projected based on new recruits from Dec 08 to present

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Overall csu vet population with

Overall CSU vet population with

*

*

*

Slight increase from Fall ‘07 to Spring ‘08, Significant increase Fall ‘08-Spring ‘09

(Most campuses see a civilian drop in these numbers from Fall to Spring)

Fall 2009 numbers as of May 2009

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Overall results

overall results

  • Increase # of vets in classes every semester

    • Increased overall veteran population on campus

    • Not all CSU campus vets are in classes

      • Less than 100 in Fall 2005, to nearly 400 in spring 2009

  • VA supports and recognizes it as a model program for returning veterans

    • This helps with recruiting


Good program created recognized

Good program created, recognized

  • There are many model vet programs available

    • Check the list of the initial ACE/Wal-Mart awardees

      • Select the one that you feel you can do best

    • Convince your campus to adopt a similar type of program

      • Follow the lead of other models

        • Easier to modify than create

    • Get backing from the campus administration

      • Have to show local veteran groups that the campus is serious

        • Vets know the difference between a ‘feel good’ act and the real thing


How to get support from the campus administration

How to get support from the campus administration

Garner Support from people in 3 departments

Registrars

They need to admit them, and review their applications

Treasury

They need to know the economic impact

They will listen to you and think ‘it’s a good, warm fuzzy idea’

They will act when you show them the financial impact

Faculty

Find those that have served and are GI Bill grads

They may teach for free in the early going

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


How to get treasury to move

How to get Treasury to move

Vets have guaranteed tuition dollars

Not mom/dad money,

Not Student loan, pay back someday money

Present financial institutions stability may change this availability

Private Universities can now compete

New GI Bill opens doors to more institutions

Community Colleges will be impacted

No longer the ‘monthly stipend for all expenditures’

Direct Bill to campus changes need for up front payment

Find the number of vets in your region

Show the potential financial impact with % of vets attending

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Recruiting how to get them and keep them on your campus

recruiting How to get them and keep them on your campus

  • Before you start to recruit

    • You need a good veteran program

    • You need to get support (non-binding support)

      • From local veteran programs, the local VA

      • Official university documentation showing university support

    • You need to identify your potential market

      • How many post 9/11 veterans in the area

      • How many are on campus right now?

        • If X% of the available market was recruited

          • Does this income support the program

        • Grants/outside funding can start it,

          • Sustainability depends upon the customers


How to recruit cont d

How to Recruit cont’d

  • Methods of Recruiting veterans

  • Freshmen/Adult Learners approach does not work

    • Whole different demographic

      • Different way of thinking

    • Focus on One on one, not groups

    • Focus on support personnel of veterans

    • Understand the reason why they enlisted

      • This gives you a glimpse into who they are

        • 1% of the population who have chosen to defend the other 99%


College university support

College/University Support


University support

University support

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


State or local legislature

State or local legislature

Does not have to be financial in nature, just a letter of support/recognition helps


Local legislature and university support can then be shown to local va officials in community

Local legislature and university support can then be shown to local VA officials in community

Recognized by the VA in Washington

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

Local VA support grows to other vet departments/programs

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


How the pre military veteran thinks

How the pre-military veteran thinks

  • Why they signed up

    • Majority of the 1,861,926 post 9-11 vets enlisted for 2 reasons

      • They wanted to do something when we were attacked on 9/11

        • Small town USA women and men wanting to protect their families & neighbors

      • Didn’t know what to do when the graduated from High School

        • They knew they weren’t ready for college…but… what else is there to do?

        • Felt they were not ready for College…..yet

          • This shows the maturity of the veteran.


How the post military veteran thinks

How the post-military veteran thinks

  • Where do they go from here?

    • Many of the 1,861,926 post 9-11 veterans enlisted for life

      • They wanted to be in for 20yrs

      • After 3-4 years, politics of the military made them leave

        • This is troubling, because the military gave them security

          • Always had your day planned, knew who was in charge

        • Difficult to leave the women and men in their unit

          • They trusted each other with their lives

          • Friendship and trust not found in civilian world

    • Now what to do with the rest of their lives?

      • Who can they trust?; Who can they depend upon?

        • Veterans are very cautious of civilians because of this experience


What the post military veteran is exposed to

What the post military veteran is exposed to

  • Civilian World

    • Much Less Order

      • Day is not planned by someone else

        • No daily ‘mission’, no daily recognition of ‘mission accomplished’

    • People/organizations wanting to help

      • Vets are over-whelmed by ‘do gooders’

        • Those who want to ‘Help the Soldiers’ because it makes them feel good to do so.

        • They are cautious of those organizations who want to take their GI Bill money to become ‘locksmiths’ or other quick easy certificates

  • Family and loved ones

    • Pressure to go to college because they promised their families

      • Parents bought into the military choice; ‘money for college’

        • Not sure if they can handle college after many years out of high school

  • No one else understands them except for other OEF/OIF veterans


And your local va center

and your local VA center

  • VA supports a type program

    • Difficult/costly to find OEF/OIF vets in outer regions of VA service area

      • If vets are attracted to a campus with a vet friendly program

        • They will go to the campus

      • If VA is on campus they can see more vets

        • Improves efficiency of the VA

      • If VA is on campus more vets will attend the campus

        • Easier to get their questions answered between classes

        • Vs driving/waiting for hours among the ‘old vets’ at the VA


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

Veteran seeks counseling only after it is needed

Referred to by spouse, family, law enforcement

Many times after problems have arose

Instructor observes vet/student daily

Rather than once/month with VA appts

Level of involvement can be determined early

Respecting confidentiality

Intervention can occur before big problems arise

Why the VA supports a type program

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Why the va supports a type program

Why the VA supports a type program

  • Today’s campus very multi-cultural

    • students are from region where the vet has served

  • Veteran comes into contact with many cultures

    • More so than any job could do

  • Veteran begins to adjust to the cultures

    • The different culture student is just a student, not a threat

      • Veteran gets used to this slowly over a period of months

        • May not adjust if their environment does not create this opportunity

  • This did not happen after previous wars!


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

Improves VA and OEF/OIF contact

Have VA rep be on college campus 1 day/week

Designated hours

Vets know the day (s) and time (s) ahead of time

Have office set aside for VA representative

Vets can see the VA rep in-between classes

VA rep can see 4 different campuses/week

1 day to report to Main Veteran office

VA rep can be from 4 different VA areas

Counseling, Medical, Benefits, education

One day/month vet students visit the VA dept of their choice

Why the VA supports a type program

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


And ohio s va efficiency

and Ohio’s VA efficiency

Among all 1.86M separated OIF/OEF Veterans

  • 40% (347,750) obtained VA care since FY 2002

    • 96% (333,000) seen as outpatients only

    • 4% (14,700) hospitalized at least once

  • This constitutes:

    • 41% former active duty troops

    • 39% National Guard and Reserve troops

  • Over 11,000 OIF/OEF veterans seen in Ohio.

  • 56,998 total deployed in Ohio since 9/11-

    • Only ~1/5 oh Ohio’s OEF vets have visited the VA

Edgardo Padin-Rivera, Ph.D. Chair, PTSD Experts Workgroup Ohio VA Health Care NetworkChief, Psychology Service Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center


Total for all four ohio va medical centers

Total for all four Ohio VA medical centers

  • $956 million total Budget

  • 1,593,356 total unique patients

  • 7,583 combined FTE’s

    • 476 Physicians, 1,553 nurses

  • Average of 210 unique patients/FTE

  • **Unique Patients are ALL patients, from WWII to OEF/OIF


Oef oif veterans and ohio va

OEF/OIF Veterans and Ohio’ VA

  • 56,998 Ohio OEF/OIF veterans deployed since 9/11

    • Only ~11,000 have visited Ohio’s VA centers since 9/11

      • Less than 1 in 5 OEF/OIF veterans visited Ohio’s VA’s

    • 7,583 FTE’s from all Ohio’s VA centers

      • 476 Physicians, 1,553 nurses

      • 5,554 non medical VA employees

        • Support Staff, LISW, Outreach personnel, etc

      • 11,000 OEF/OIF veterans/5,554 FTE staff

    • 1.9 OEF/OIF veterans per FTE


Va impact on northeastern ohio

VA impact on Northeastern Ohio

  • Present Vet campus population

  • One VA rep Visit 4 campuses

    • Monday

      • Lorain County Community-~200 vets

    • Tuesday

      • Cleveland State-345 vets

    • Wednesday

      • Akron University-574 vets

    • Thursday

      • Cuyahoga Community-705 vets, three campuses

  • One VA rep has seen 1,824 vets in one week

    • 1,824/FTE when having the VA being on campus

    • 1.9/FTE when staying in the VA offices

  • This improved ratio is the force that makes your local VA want to work with your campus!


Now how to reach them

What not to do (What I Did 1st)

Hold a ‘veteran fair’

Vets call them ‘loser fairs’

Lots of people = suicide bomber

Use Mass media approach

Costly

Flooding the area for a small % of the population

Don’t believe the media

Based on what they have seen while in Iraq

Mass e-mails or letters

Will ignore the e-mails

Place the letters in the ‘Do gooder’ pile

What to do (What I did 2nd)

Reach them on a 1 on 1 basis

Eliminate fear of mass of people

Use military friendly media/events

Parades, Military Times, etc

Reach the parents of vets

Parent support groups

‘THE’ Brochure

Use other OEF/OIF on your campus to accompany you

Vets will believe other vets

Have local VA get the word out

They come into contact everyday with OEF/OIF vets

Use National Guard 360 briefings

Can reach guard troops as a group

Now, How to reach them

Most Important, how many in our area, how many can we reach?


Two types of veterans to recruit

Active Duty

Marines, Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard

They come back home individually

Harder to find in the general population

National Guard/Reserve

They come home as a unit

Easier to address them when they come home

Guard Has ‘briefings’ every 30,60 and 90 days

Military sponsored

Easier to address many at one time as a group

Difficult for a campus to get into these briefings

Very little time during these weekend events

Two types of veterans to recruit

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

Total Deployed by State- Active Duty +Guard/ Reservesince December 2008

8,185

10,110

57,109

10,927

4,476

22,910

5,268

19,832

73,279

22,738

52,650

10,587

5,079

10,877

25,049

16,319

162,213

16,426

6,380

12,819

56,988

69,573

68,203

38,308

11,405

14,533

24,862

12,101

30,044

22,058

49,179

17,084

35,156

18,165

43,578

19,899

53,047

9,254

24,513

29,276

27,635

30,925

11,687

47,319

21,107

32,981

233,099

27,856

180,032

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

3,146

2,789

12,335

2,845

2,072

11,538

2,519

9,165

19,956

5,370

12,154

3,820

2,815

3,451

10,853

8,113

35,926

2,818

1,524

4,634

18,175

20,622

15,850

9,998

5,208

4,841

9,900

6,989

12,628

6,258

19,129

7,683

11,684

18,165

15,192

9,842

12,058

5,100

10,132

7,985

10,295

13,544

3,048

16,459

10,742

2,752

30,641

10,254

20,053

Total Deployed by State- Guard/Reserve, since 12/08

2,125

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

5,039

7,321

44,774

8,082

2,404

11,372

2,749

10,667

53,323

17,368

40,496

10,587

2,264

7,426

14,196

8,206

126,287

13,608

4,856

8,185

38,813

48,951

52,353

28,310

6,197

9,962

14,962

5,112

17,416

15,800

30,050

9,401

23,472

10,494

28,386

10,057

40,989

4,154

14,181

22,291

17,340

17,381

8,369

30,860

10,365

30,229

202,458

17,602

159,979

Total Deployed by State- Active Duty, since 12/08

2,560

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


How to find the veterans within your state

How to find the veterans within your state?

  • How many are on campus already?

  • Is our state Vet friendly? Which one’s aren’t?

  • has extensive database

    • Number of veterans in ‘Top 500 Vet Friendly’ campuses

    • Number of veterans deployed by county

      • Deployed veterans most likely ones who need

  • has data for every county t/out country


Top vet friendly colleges in ohio

Top Vet Friendly colleges in Ohio


Top vet friendly colleges in indiana

Top Vet Friendly colleges in Indiana

Data from the IAVA ‘Top 500’ Spring 2008


Top vet friendly colleges in kentucky

Top Vet Friendly colleges in Kentucky


Using present vet campus population

Using present vet campus population

  • Getting approval/input from present veteran population on campus

    • Try to reach the vets already on your campus

      • Without ‘Calling Them Out’

  • Have faculty place inquiries on their syllabi*

    • ‘Requesting input from present vet campus population’ on bottom of syllabi

      • Vets can call the number provided

      • Campus vets are recruited ‘silently’

      • Their input is of tremendous value

      • They will help recruit other veterans to your campus

* From Montgomery College veteran program review, Louisville conference Feb 2009


How many oef oif veterans in the region

How many OEF/OIF veterans in the Region?

  • has extensive database

    • Number of veterans DEPLOYED since 9/11 is known

      • Deployed veterans most likely ones who need

        type program

  • has data for every state in the country

  • has data for every county in every state


Deployment data for ohio

1,211

2,115

995

301

210

230

4,765

318

436

1,420

494

173

156

629

1,064

2,769

803

113

323

387

727

359

318

222

970

206

729

1,994

81

131

650

748

645

191

216

125

322

334

140

151

408

469

206

123

275

323

289

237

507

172

465

266

823

314

610

278

5,370

727

261

196

63

236

722

2,798

82

865

345

83

175

107

710

1,761

510

303

400

478

209

80

3,397

131

102

1,066

303

329

273

526

153

296

Deployment data for Ohio

  • 56,998 total deployed

    • Total of 16,617 in

      • Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Toledo, Y-Town

    • 40,381 in small town Ohio

      • 7,353 currently deployed


Deployment data for indiana

556

1,143

138

105

719

96

256

1,903

783

276

202

342

128

176

123

1,945

89

191

262

76

124

175

263

210

129

117

97

467

993

339

93

135

85

102

162

195

650

81

163

631

689

201

137

3,670

183

442

453

95

559

73

100

169

191

82

104

730

293

108

158

545

496

313

133

268

136

117

138

173

55

122

266

125

197

62

148

215

56

116

98

146

599

151

163

102

317

91

137

155

209

182

80

747

Deployment data for Indiana

  • 30,044 total From Indiana Deployed since 9/11

    • 7,518 from Indianapolis, Gary, Ft. Wayne and Chicago suburbs

  • 22,526 from Small Town Indiana

    • 3,637 currently deployed


And the individual veteran

and the individual veteran

  • The Off campus one on one visit

    • Meet off campus for coffee/breakfast-they are always up early

    • Don’t discuss military events, status, etc

    • Ask why they signed up

      • Ask about parents reaction to them enlisting

        • This gives you an idea about them before they enlisted

    • Bring college admission form with you

      • No charge for application for veterans to your campus

    • Have them come to campus for the next scheduled visit

      • Give them a personal walk thru to all important campus personnel

  • All This reduces the pressure of the first day on campus


And the parents loved ones

and the Parents/Loved Ones

  • Loved ones will help recruit for your college/university

    • Reach the parents/spouses in the region

      • They worried for 3-5 years over their loved one,

      • They Go through 4 phases of adjustment

  • Family Readiness Groups (FRG’s)

    • Sponsored by the Army

      • 50% of all deployed veterans are from the Army

  • Marine Mom support groups

  • Every county/region has at least one of these military support groups

    • They usually meet once/month

    • Connect with them, and attend their meetings regularly

    • They are as cautious as their sons/daughters about ‘do gooders’ so you have to earn their respect

      • Tell them what the campus has in store for them

      • Let them communicate that to their deployed sons/daughters

      • The word will then reach other OEF/OIF military that are back home


Places events to find oef oif veterans

Places/Events to find OEF/OIF veterans

  • County Fairs-Biggest event in Small Town USA

    • Most vets in each state come from small town USA

      • County Fairs have been around for a long time

      • VFW, AMVETS, other veteran groups have booths there

  • Parades

    • Most always have the flag in the front on display

      • Chance to show their respect for it

  • Car shows

    • Many, many mechanics got their start in the military


At the county fair local festivals

at the County Fair/Local Festivals

  • 88 Counties in Ohio- 88 Fairs

  • All are at least 150 yrs old

    • Rich Tradition in these rural counties

    • People meet, compete and visit

      • Fairgoers show off their

        • Crops, Livestock, Hobbies/crafts/collections

        • Teens show off their boyfriends/girlfriends

  • 19yr old enlisted women and men

    • Just left this tradition and they miss it

    • ‘Fair Time’ is ‘Fair Time’, whether in Baghdad or back home


And share the fair

and ‘Share the Fair”

  • “Share the Fair with the Troops”

    • Loan video cameras to families of service-members serving overseas during the fair

    • Create DVD’s of fair memories for that soldier

      • Have two copies made

        • One for the Soldier to send overseas

        • One for the family to keep locally

    • Put campus vet program info on DVD along with their memories

    • Direct Marketing to your target audience

      • Campus admissions info, veteran program etc.

      • Mom/Dads see it, service-members sees it

      • Service-members friends see it

      • Campus has great PR by doing it

  • Goal- Families will take part in the video process, and campus gets its message out to the families and the troops


Results of share the fair pickaway county

Results of Share the Fair-Pickaway County


Results of share the fair madison county

Results of Share the Fair- Madison County


Results of share the fair mahoning county

Results of Share the Fair- Mahoning County


S upportive e ducation for the r eturning v eteran helping ohio s best brightest and bravest get their degree by john schupp

Results of “Share the Fair” ExperimentMahoning County-Top News Story on all three Youngstown area TV networks, 6 and 11pm Sunday Sept 3rd 2008


Results of share the fair mahoning cty

Results of Share the Fair- Mahoning Cty

  • From the Soldier who rec’d the DVD

    • Hey guys!

    • That video was amazing and i loved it so much! i heard that on the actual news i was like just plastered all over the place and they showed it like 4 different times and each time was a little different and they showed on 2 different stations. Did you get all of them on video? I thought that it was amazing and that i never even came close to expecting it. once i was watching the video i kinda thought maybe something was on the news but i wasn’t for sure... i totally missed the note on the front that said something about a news clip but i read it but i read it in a hurry. I watched that thing over and over and over on my buddies lap top and i kept rewinding it and listening to it. mom you looked really good too. Your hair is so fluffy like you stood under a hair dryer for hours haha. I love you though and i think you look really good. Dad you looked crazy on the news. Your hair was slicked back and you were movin all over the place hahaha it was awesome though that you guys had such a good time actually doing it. but thank you so much for it. it was the most amazing gift that i think i have ever gotten. It really means alot to me and and made me feel really good……. ...ive been sitting in front of the tv for like the past 11 hours. But take care and ill be writing again soon. I love you guys and ill talk to you later!

    •             Nathan


Parents loved ones cont d

Parents/Loved Ones-cont’d

  • ‘THE’ Brochure

    • Many campuses stress creating a brochure about their veteran program

      • Costly to create-

        • Need a ‘Mission Statement’, A ‘Purpose’ etc.

        • Outside marketing firms can charge substantial amount

        • Printing costs, distribution, etc

      • Many people do not read them-

        • They are looked at and tossed out

    • There is one brochure that is read from cover to cover and is never tossed out!!


Recruiting the brochure

Recruiting- ‘THE’ Brochure

  • The Church Bulletin

    • Nothing else to do while waiting for service to start

    • Feel to guilty to throw it away…. Immediately

  • Reaches three generations of loved ones

    • Parents, grandparents, spouses, children

  • It Already has troop announcements in it

    • Just add the info of the university program to it

  • It is trusted for its authenticity

    • After all It is in the ‘Church Bulletin’


Area veteran population deployed since 9 11

Area veteran population- Deployed since 9/11

Counties in and around Cuyahoga county

Counties in Ohio

Total deployed = 17,036

Counties in western PA

Total deployed = 13,778

Only 3 Community colleges in the region

2,215

1,211

916

995

318

588

4,765

747

1,064

1,420

2,769

803

723

970

727

1,059

1,994

1,169

6,361


Effect on vet enrollment at csu

effect on vet Enrollment at CSU

Cleveland State Univeristy Enrollment- Fall 2008

17,000

Total area Deployed personnel available

30,814

If program and marketing success improves enrollment to 5% of available

Approx 1,540 GI Bill students sign up

From direct marketing techniques to individual veterans


Effect on csu vet enrollment

effect on CSU vet Enrollment

National Guard recruiting techniques

Find ways to get info to troops through national guard officials

Total Ohio National Guard in state- -18,175

Spread out over ~50 bases in Ohio

Average 363 National Guard troops/base

8 bases in northeastern Ohio = 2,908 guard troops in region

If improves enrollment to 10% of available

Approx 290 National Guard GI students

Fully paid academic scholarships


Letting your va recruit for you

Letting your VA recruit for you

  • For Ohio, 2007

  • 1,593,356 total unique patients in 2007

  • 7,583 combined FTE’s (potential Univ recruiters)

  • Let 1% of Unique patients be Chapter 31

    • Fully paid tuition, books, parking etc.

    • 15,933 have option for a fully paid academic scholarship

    • Let 5% of these attend Univ’s program = 796 students


And potential campus enrollment

From Regional VA center recruiting for the university-

Chapter 31

1% of 1.59M patients in 2007 be chapter 31 =15,933

Let 5% attend CSU – 796 new students

From 1 on 1 recruiting and other events to attract OEF/OIF vets

30,814 Deployed vets from Northeast OH and PA

Using Marine Moms, Share the Fair and other recruiting techniques

Let 5% attend CSU = 1,540 new CSU students

National Guard recruiting

18,175 Active Guard/Reservists in Ohio

2,908 in northeastern Ohio

Let 10% attend CSU = 290 new CSU students

2,626 new CSU Students

and potential campus enrollment


Financial impact of on retention rates at csu

Financial Impact of on retention rates at CSU

increases Vet Freshmen Class to 2,626

Tuition = ~$3,100/semester 12 credit hours

Total income Fall Semester-$8.1M

70% retention from Fall Semester with

1,838 veterans in Spring Semester

Total Income Spring Semester- $5.7M

Total income Fall/Spring Semester- $13.8M

Total income from CSU Freshmen Vet Class- $13.8M

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Financial impact of on grad rates at csu

Financial Impact of on grad rates at CSU

Grad Rates- 3% for GI’s at a 4yr campus

Allow to increase grad rate to national avg.

At a 35% Grad Rate

2,626 freshmen = 919 grads = $22.7M

Impact on Cleveland State University Income

$22.7M/yr from grads

$13.8M/yr from freshmen retention

Veterans have guaranteed tuition money

Cash Paying Customers!

These numbers help convince your university to adopt a veteran program!

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Financial impact on cleveland

Financial impact on Cleveland

Tuition dollars saved

Cost of Living allowance

SERV Propreitary and Confidential


Effect on tuition saved

effect on Tuition saved

Cuyahoga County Civilians

If 919 CSU grads/yr

~$7,000 student loans/yr

$22.7M in student loans/yr

Goes to out of town banks

Cuyahoga County Vets

919 CSU GI Grads/yr

No Student Loans

$22.7M/yr goes directly into area Economy

Vets first paycheck their own

Not paying back student loan

SERV Propreitary and Confidential


Cost of living allowance on communities around cleveland ohio

Cost of Living allowance on communities around Cleveland Ohio

2,626 GI Bill eligible vets since 9/11 on campus

Allow 75% to have 100% benefits = 1,970

Each will receive ~$950/month while in School

9 months of school/year

$16.8 Million/yr guaranteed federal dollars

Into Cuyahoga and surrounding counties’ communities

For them to live while in school!

SERV Propreitary and Confidential


Why is working and will work

Why is working and will work

This generation vs. ‘The Greatest Generation’

How did it Happen?

How many WW II GI’s enrolled?

What were their graduation rates?

How many 2yr and 4yr degrees?

What were the factors?

How were they prepared to be the ‘Greatest Generation’ ?

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


U s in the 1940 s pre post wwii

U.S. in the 1940’s Pre/Post WWII

WWII veteran demographics

In the 1940s,

23% had a high school diploma

77% DID NOT HAVE A HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA

3% had college degrees.

1940,

160,000 US citizens had college degrees.

1950

500,000 US citizens had college degrees

320,000 were service-members

50% of 2.2M campus veterans were married,

25% had children

Vast Majority of US campus veterans were 25-29yrs old

Milton Greenberg-report taken from the U.S. Department of State publication, Historians on America

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Wwii campus population in the classroom

WWII campus population in the classroom

2.2M veterans enrolled in ~1,800 Colleges/Univ’s

Average of 1,222/campus

1.6M Nationwide University enrollment in 1939; 2.9M in 1949

University of Michigan-

1940- 10,000 students; 1948- 30,000 enrolled

Syracuse University

1941- 6,000 students; 1947- 19,000 students

1949 more than 45% of all College Students were Vets

The Classroom was full of WW II veterans

They had that camaraderie right away

The ‘Unit Mentality’ was already in place!

Dr Jennifer Adams, Penn State Univ. ASHE meeting Sacramento Nov 18 2000

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Results of the first gi bill era

Results of the First GI Bill era

1956 –

11 years after final victory –

2.2 million WWII veterans attended college

180,000 College educated engineers,

200,000 College educated accountants,

238,000 teachers,

91,000 scientists,

67,000 doctors,

22,000 dentists,

1 million other college-educated individuals.

~1.7M college degrees

78% Graduation Rate

Milton Greenberg-report taken from the U.S. Department of State publication, Historians on America

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Oef oif ww ii college preparation

OEF/OIF & WW II College preparation

WW II vets

2.2M went into College

All four year institutions, no community colleges then

Only 23% had high school diplomas

The other 77% did not finish high school

1.7M graduated with 4 yr degree

78% Grad rate for Bachelors Degree

Their decision to serve, allowed them to graduate

The ‘Unit Mentality’ took over, no one left behind

Re-Creates the ‘Unit Mentality’ Success

Milton Greenberg-report taken from the U.S. Department of State publication, Historians on America

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Universities ready to launch

Universities ready to launch

  • Fall 2009

    • Youngstown State Univ

      • Jim Olive

        • Cleveland VA

          • Pat Hall

    • Univ of Akron

      • Rick Young

        • Cleveland VA

          • Pat Hall

    • University of West Virginia

      • Terry Miller

        • Morgantown VA

  • Fall 2009

    • Thiel College

      • John Rindy

      • Mercer County VA

    • Univ. of New Mexico

      • Eleese Wheeler

      • Albuquerque NM

        • Brian Pilgrim

    • Univ of Louisville

      • Joe Dablow

      • Louisville VA

        • Crystal Woodard

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Univ s considering for spring 2010

Univ’s considering for Spring 2010

Ohio

Ohio University, Hocking College, Univ of Dayton, Stark State College, Owens Community College, BGSU,OSU, Walsh University

Pennsylvania

Robert Morris, Art Institute of Pittsburgh

Kentucky

University of Louisville, Eastern Kentucky, Northern Kentucky, Kentucky State, Western Kentucky, Morehead State Univ

West Virginia

University of West Virginia, Shepherd University

Michigan

Northern Michigan University, U of M-Flint, Ferris State, Eastern Michigan

Arizona

University of Arizona, Arizona State, Northern Arizona, Maricopa CC


Universities interested in concept

Universities interested in Concept

  • Michigan

    • Grand Valley State, Madonna Univ, Northern Michigan, Central Michigan

  • Florida

    • University of South Florida, St. Petersburg College

  • Texas-

    • UTPB, Sam Houston, Univ. of Houston, UTPA

  • Oklahoma

    • East Central University

  • Kansas

    • University of Kansas, Washburn Univ

  • Alabama-

    • Univ of Alabama Tuscaloosa, UAB

  • Illinois

    • Lewis University

  • Arkansas

    • Southern Arkansas University

  • Alaska

    • Univ. of Alaska

SERV Proprietary and Confidential


Va medical centers supporting serv

VA Medical Centers Supporting SERV

Ohio

Cleveland, Dayton, Columbus

Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh(2 ea), Butler County

Arizona

Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott

Southwest Texas

El Paso, Big Spring

New Mexico

Albuquerque

Louisville

13 total VA Medical Systems

Veterans Affairs-Washington DC


Neighboring states updates

Neighboring States updates

  • Indiana

    • Eli Lilly has donated $5M to the cause

      • To distribute to IN campuses for veteran programs

    • MFRI group to review the proposals

      • Seed money, not forever grant money

    • Is surrounded by vet heavy states

      • Can/Will recruit outside of its borders

  • West Virginia

    • University of West Virginia starting in Fall

      • Low overall vet population, high vet campus population

        • Will recruit in southern Ohio


Neighboring states updates1

Neighboring States updates

  • Michigan-Fall 2009

    • Meeting Eastern, Western, Central Michigan univ’s next week

      • U of M Flint starting type program in Fall

      • ROTC on campuses are getting it started quickly

  • Kentucky-Fall 2009

    • University of Louisville starting type program in Fall

      • Northern, Eastern, Western, Kentucky State all starting this fall

      • Again, Low overall vet population, high vet campus population

        • Will recruit in southern Ohio

  • Pennsylvania-Fall 2009

    • Thiel College, Robert Morris starting type program


And potential veteran impact college tuition income

52 OH comm. colleges

60% to attend CC’s

23,935 total

Avg. 460/campus

Avg Tuition/yr = $2,800

Avg. Income/campus

$1.3M/yr each campus

$67M/yr for all campii

and potential veteran impact College Tuition Income

56,998 deployed vets in Ohio, if 70% attend OH’s campuses, 39,892 on campus

  • 16 OH Univ’s

    • 40% to attend Univ’s

      • 15,957 total

        • Avg. 997/campus

        • Avg Tuition/yr = $7,800

        • Avg. Income/campus

          • $7.7M/yr each campus

          • $124M/yr for all campii


And potential veteran impact cost of living at campus communities

52 OH comm. colleges

52 Communities

60% of vets on campus

Avg. 460/campus

75% have Full benefits

Avg. Cost of Living/campus

$950/month

9 months/year

$3.9M/yr for all communities

and potential veteran impact Cost of Living at Campus Communities

56,998 deployed vets in Ohio, if 70% attend OH’s campuses, 39,892 on campus

  • 16 OH Universities

    • 16 Communities

    • 40% of vets on campus

      • Avg. 997/campus

      • 75% have Full benefits

      • Avg. Cost of Living/campus

        • $950/month

        • 9 months/year

        • $8.6M/yr for all communities

Total dollars per year into Ohio in Cost of Living Alone- $341M


With their military experience and their 2 or 4 yr degree from ohio s campuses

With Their Military Experience and Their 2 or 4 yr Degreefrom Ohio’s Campuses

WE can make this generation

  • The Next “Great Generation”


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