Literary p resent tense
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Literary P resent Tense. Writing in ONLY the present tense as if the story is happening NOW! -used to summarize the plot or subject matter of a work of literature - referring to a writer’s relationship to his/her work. Why use literary present tense?.

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Literary P resent Tense

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Literary p resent tense

Literary Present Tense

Writing in ONLY the present tense as if the story is happening NOW!

-used to summarize the plot or subject matter of a work of literature

- referring to a writer’s relationship to his/her work


Why use literary present tense

Why use literary present tense?

  • In every poem, or novel the action is happening now—it’s timeless

  • Never write in past tense when you discuss the work of literature in your own writing.


Examples

Examples

Incorrect Example:

In “The Raven,” Edgar Allan Poe wrote about

a talking bird. This bird spoke to the main

character and repeated the word “nevermore.”

Correct Example:

In “The Raven,” Edgar Allan Poe writes about

a talking bird. This bird speaks to the main

character and repeats the word “nevermore.”


Literary present tense and voice

Literary Present Tense and Voice

In order to create a strong, formal voice in your writing you must use an active voice in addition to using literary present tense.

  • Passive Voice – the subject is not doing the action in a sentence

  • Active Voice – the subject is doing the action in a sentence


Passive and active voices

Passive and Active Voices

Passive Voice – the subject is not doing the action in a sentence

The tornado was photographed by a student.

Shingles were torn from the roof by the high winds.

Active Voice – the subject is doing the action in a sentence

A student photographs the tornado.

The high winds tear shingles from the roof.

**In your thesis statements try not to use any form of the verb “to be”.


Literary p resent tense

Now, try it… rewrite the following sentences, changing the passive voice to active voice and present tense.

  • Due to severe storms the film festival at the community center was canceled by officials.

  • My sisters and I were told the news by our parents, who had planned an all-day party.

  • An alternative plan for a “Davis Family Film Festival” was made by my parents.

  • Old videos from the time we were kids were pulled out of storage by Dad.

  • Movies such as Aladdin and The Lion King were enjoyed by everyone, and popcorn was eaten by us in mass quantities.

    Remember - have the subject performing the actions!!


More practice

More practice…

Elements of Language - pg 520-521

1.Review Examples on page 520

2.Exercise 5 - all

Remember - we are not only using active voice but present tense to strengthen our writing!


Wednesday 11 3 10 passive and active voices

Wednesday 11-3-10Passive and Active Voices

Rewrite the following sentences using the active voice – remember - have the subject performing the actions.

1. Trees were being blown over by the wind.

2. The cave was explored by the science class.

3. The Gettysburg Address was written by Abraham Lincoln.

Writing Review Activity – materials on the desks. 


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