The basic outline for your argumentative speech
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The Basic Outline for your Argumentative speech. Introduction Your introduction needs to do three things: 1-Grab the attention of the audience! By the end of the first sentence the audience has usually decided if they’re interested.

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The Basic Outline for your Argumentative speech

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The basic outline for your argumentative speech

The Basic Outline for your Argumentative speech


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

Introduction

Your introduction needs to do three things:

1-Grab the attention of the audience! By the end of the first sentence the audience has usually decided if they’re interested.

2-Provide the background information necessary for your audience to understand what you’re talking about (definitions, history, etc.)

3-Lead into your claim.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Introduction continued…

  • You will need a good attention getting device to begin your speech.

  • Don’t start with questions, “Have you ever…?”, “What if…?”, “ My topic/name is…”, “Don’t you hate it when…?” or anything equally icky.

  • Some possibilities for good beginnings are:

    • anecdote (Your parents tell you these all the time. For example, “When I was a kid….”)

    • Interesting and amazing fact or statistic (and it needs to be REALLY interesting or amazing!)

    • Proverb (You never really understand a man until you walk a mile in his shoes.)

    • Fantastic quote

    • True story


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

Claim

(sometimes called a thesis statement)

  • This is a powerful statement that tells the audience what your topic is and what side of the argument you are on. Your audience should have no question about what your topic is and whether you are going to argue for or against it.

  • Never include examples or evidence in your claim. That comes later.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

Sub-claim 1

  • This is the first reason that you believe your claim to be true.

  • Never include examples or evidence in your claim. That comes later.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

Evidence & Explanation

for Sub-claim 1

  • Use evidence from your research to prove your sub-claim is true.

  • Explain or elaborate on the evidence.

  • Always give the source of the evidence using internal citations (who said it and what their qualifications are)

  • Use MLA format to cite the source in the bibliography.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

Sub-claim 2

  • This is the first reason that you believe your claim to be true. It should be the strongest of your two points.

  • Never include examples or evidence in your claim. That comes later.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Evidence & Explanation

  • For Sub-claim 2

  • Use evidence from your research to prove your sub-claim is true.

  • Explain or elaborate on the evidence.

  • Always give the source of the evidence using internal citations (who said it and what their qualifications are)

  • Use MLA format to cite the source in the bibliography.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

Warrant: After hearing all the evidence, there should be an obvious conclusion that your audience should come to. This is your warrant. A warrant is a re-statement of the facts that explains to your audience how they should interpret the evidence. Do two things in your warrant:

  • Briefly summarize your claim, subclaims and evidence.

  • State the obvious conclusion.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Counterclaim

  • This is the argument that people who believe the opposite of you would give.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Evidence & Explanation for the Counterclaim

  • Find evidence that the opposite side would use to prove the counterclaim is true

  • Explain or elaborate on the evidence.

  • Always give the source of the evidence using internal citations (who said it and what their qualifications are)

  • Use MLA format to cite the source in the bibliography.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Backing

  • The backing has two jobs:

    • 1-Discredit the evidence from the counterclaim.

    • 2-Explain why the counterclaim is wrong.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Evidence & Explanation

  • for the Backing

    • Present more evidence that will back up your warrant and further discredit the counter-claim.

  • Explain or elaborate on the evidence.

  • Always give the source of the evidence using internal citations (who said it and what their qualifications are)

  • Use MLA format to cite the source in the bibliography.


The basic outline for your argumentative speech

  • Conclusion

  • This is like a lawyer's closing argument.Be sure the audience clearly understands what you want them to believe.

  • Summarize and restate both your claim and evidence.

  • Persuasively appeal to your audience one last time.

  • Don’t introduce new material.

  • Wrap it up nicely. NEVER end with "and that's my speech", “I’m done” , “That’s all” , Amen” oranything like it.


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