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SCOTTISH ENGLISH. ARABIA MARTÍNEZ SEGUÍ. INDEX. Background Grammar Vocabulary Phonetics Test. SCOTLAND. Scotland is part of United Kingdom The money used is called the sterling pound The population of Scotland is 4.996.000. GEOGRAPHY OF SCOTLAND. Edinburgh Glasgow Aberdeen.

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SCOTTISH ENGLISH

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SCOTTISH ENGLISH

ARABIA MARTÍNEZ SEGUÍ


INDEX

  • Background

  • Grammar

  • Vocabulary

  • Phonetics

  • Test


SCOTLAND

  • Scotland is part of United Kingdom

  • The money used is called the sterling pound

  • The population of Scotland is 4.996.000


GEOGRAPHY OF SCOTLAND

  • Edinburgh

  • Glasgow

  • Aberdeen


LANGUAGE

  • Scottish English: varieties of English spoken in Scotland

    • Gaelic is an ancient language of Scotland

    • Most of the Gaelic speaking-people live in the north-west


LANGUAGE HISTORY

  • Union of the Crowns (1603)

  • Union of the Parliaments (1707)

  • Steady decline of Scots begins in 16th century, by the end of the 17th century

  • English has gained considerable influence in Scotland

  • English learned formally in Highlands and northern and western


NATIONAL SYMBOLS


GRAMMATICAL CHARACTERISTICS


Characteristics I

  • Willinstead of shall .

    Ex: Will I seeyouafter?

  • Passiveexpressedby “get”

    Ex: I gottold off

  • Verbs of motionmaybeelidedbeforeadverbs of motion

    Ex: I’llaway home then; thecatwantsout.

  • “Have” behave more likeanauxiliary

    Ex: he’d a good time


Characteristics II

  • “Needto”, “use to” and “dareto” are used as mainverbs.

    Ex: he didn’tneedto do that; he doesn’tdaretotalk

  • Perfectaspect of a verbisindicatedusing “be” as auxiliarywiththepreposition “after”

    Ex: “he is after going” instead of “ he had gone”

  • Someverbs are usedprogressively.

    Ex: I washopingtoseehimortheyweremeaningto come


Characteristics III

  • Pronouns in –selfmaybeused non- reflexively

    Ex: How’syourselftoday?

  • Anybody, everybody, nobody, somebody are preferredtoanyone, everyone, no one, someone.

  • Amn’t I? isusedvirtuarllytotheexclusion of aren’t I?

    Ex: I’mexpectedtoo, amn’t I?


Characteristics IV

  • The use of “not” ratherthan “n’t”

    Ex: he’llnot come; you’renotwanted.

  • The adverbial particlefollowstheverb

    Ex: he turnedoutthe light

  • Use of participleafter “need”

    Ex: My car needswashed


LEXICAL CHARACTERISTICS


ScotEng words used in Scotland

  • Dinnae= Don’t

  • Aye= yes

  • Brae= hill

  • Wee = small

  • To mind= to remember

  • Dram= drink

  • Gate= road

  • Nippin’ = nagging

  • Paddock = frog

  • Canny = careful

  • Kirk= church

  • Kilt = Scottish Skirt

  • Lassies = girls


Idioms

  • How are youkeeping ? = how are you?

  • That’s me away = I’mgoingnow

  • The back of nine o’ clock = soonafternine o’ clock

  • I’vegotthecold = a cold


PHONETIC CHARACTERISTICS

Vowels and consonants


Characteristics I

  • Strongly rhotic (trilled alveolar /r/ or alveolar tap /R /)

  • Monophthongized diphthongs:

    • RP/əU / as /o/ (“go” /go/);

    • RP /εI/ as /e/ (“play” /ple/);

    • RP /aU/ as /u:/ (“house” /hu:s/)

  • Unstressed vowels often realized as /I/ where RP has /ə/

    • “pilot” as /pʌilIt/,“letter” as /lEtIr/


Characteristics II

  • /u:/ and /U /, e.g. “pool” and “pull” are homophones

  • /ɔ/ and /ɒ/ merged to /ɔ/ such that “cot” and “caught” are homophones


Characteristics III

  • /I / and /ʌ/ are always short

  • RP diphthong /AI / becomes longer. e.g., in “tied”, “high”, “prize”.

  • Non-initial /t/ often replaced by /ʔ / (“butter” /bʌʔIr/) , use decreases in higher social classes


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDJflQfNUE8

“Donald wheresyourtroosers?”


Test

  • Which is the second largest city of Scotland?

    • Aberdeen

    • Glasgow

    • Edinburgh 

  • When did the Union of the Parliaments happen?

    • 1607

    • 1807

    • 1707

  • Which is a national symbol of Scotland?

    • Sunflower

    • Thistle

    • Rose


Test

  • In Scottish English, “have” could be….

    • A modal

    • An auxiliar

    • Both of them

  • Perfect aspect of a verb is indicated using “be” as auxiliary with the preposition…

    • Before

    • After

    • At


Test

  • What does “wee” mean?

    • Small

    • Big

    • Cold

  • What does “kilt” mean?

    • Church

    • Scottish skirt

    • Trousers

  • In Scottish English, which are homophones?

    • /u:/ and /U/

    • /U/ and /I/

    • /U/ and /A/


Test

  • /I / and /ʌ/ are always…

    • Homophones

    • Long

    • Short

  • When does Scottish use glottal stop?

    • Consonant “t”

    • Consonant “d”

    • Consonant “k”


THANKS FOR YOUR ATTENTION


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