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Video Part 1. http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=e89NczRc9hQ. Relationship of Assessment and Environmental Factors . By: Sonya Felmly KIN 582 West Chester University. Objectives. This presentation will include information on… The importance of assessments in physical education

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Video Part 1

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e89NczRc9hQ


Relationship of Assessment and Environmental Factors

By: Sonya Felmly

KIN 582

West Chester University


Objectives

This presentation will include information on…

  • The importance of assessments in physical education

  • Norm-Referenced Assessment/Criterion-Referenced Assessment

  • Measurement

  • Assessment Decisions, Identification Decisions, Placement Decisions, Instructional Decisions

  • Environmental Factors

  • Getting to know your student

  • Summary


Why assess in Physical Education?

  • The primary goal of assessment should be seen as the enhancement of learning, rather than simply the documentation of learning" (NASPE, 1995).

  • However, when physical educators assess students on their dress, attendance, effort, or attitude what is it that we are enhancing (Johnson, 2008).

  • Assessment- “planned technique used to measure, judge or diagnose a student’s achievement and to make inferences based on that evidence for a variety of purposes, including planning” (Doolittle,1986)


Assessment in APE

Purposes

  • Identifying if a student qualifies for adapted physical education

  • Develop appropriate goals

  • Implement appropriate instructional activities and that supports achievement towards IEP goals

  • Determine the most appropriate placement

    Zero Exclusion/ Zero Failure


Review IDEA

  • Emotional Disturbances

  • Hearing Impairment

  • Intellectual Disability

  • Multiple Disabilities

  • Orthopedic Impairment

  • Other Health Impairments

  • Specific Learning Disability

  • Speech or Language Impairment

  • Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Visual Impairment, including blindness

  • IDEA considers students to be eligible for special education, and adapted physical education if they are identified with one of the 14 disabilities stated in the law.

  • Autism

  • Deaf-Blind

  • Deafness

  • Developmental Delay


Identification Decisions

Eligibility or Classification Decisions

Determines if a child’s performance level needs special attention

Physical education teachers must select and administer assessments to identify students needs


Placement Decisions

  • Determine the most appropriate instructional placement and least restrictive environment. (Figure 2.4 page 18)

    • Childs needs and develop an appropriate program

    • Where is the program is going to be implemented?


Different Placements For Adapted PE

IDEA requires students with disabilities to be instructed in the least restricted environment.

  • General Physical Education

  • General Physical Education with APE Consultation

  • APE direct services in General Physical Education

  • Part-Time APE and Part-Time GPE

  • Reverse Mainstreaming

  • Self-Contained APE


Instructional Decisions

  • The decisions can be made by using a variety of assessment tools.

    • Data collect is used to make informed instructional decisions

    • Assessment is ongoing,- part of the instructional process

  • Best Practices


Video Part 2

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMhUStZDUEg


Assessment/Testing

  • Assessment Vs. Testing

  • Instruments, tests, assessments, items, and tools

    • Procedures used to collect information on the behavior being assessed.

      • What is being assessed

      • Conditions

      • Equipment required

      • Administration instructions

      • Scoring


Assessment Instruments

  • Norm-Referenced Instruments

    • standardized test designed to collect performance data that is compared with reference standards composed of normative data provided with the instrument.

  • Standardized Test

  • Peabody Developmental Motor Scales 2 Pg. 11


Assessment Instruments

  • Criterion-referenced instruments

    • less standardized and involve more evaluating performance against set criteria.

    • Skipping

      • Move forward by stepping and then hopping

      • Maintain an upright body posture

      • Alternate the step-hop pattern between feet

      • Move arms in opposition to legs

  • Figure 2.2 Pg. 13


Assessment Instruments

Assessments Instruments must include:

  • Validity

  • Reliability

  • Objectivity

  • Norms


Validity

  • Instrument is valid if the scores collected measure what the instrument was designed to measure.

    • Face Validity

    • Content Validity

    • Concurrent Validity

    • Construct Validity

    • Criterion Validity

  • Pg.38-42


Measurement

  • Type of data collected

    • Throwing

      • Knowledge of key components

      • How far the student can throw

      • How accurate the student can throw

      • Perform the key components correct

  • Process Vs. Product


Reliability

  • Consistency of the resultsover a multiple of trials.

  • Administration procedures

  • Case Study 2 on Page 43

  • Provide more trials and Attempts


Video Part 3

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5P84VShUx8


Objectivity/Norms

  • Reliability between two different people administering the same test to the same group of students. (Interrater Reliability)

  • Norms are a description of how a sample of students performs on a test in relation to the children in the normative sample.

    • Norms can be gender, grade, or age

    • On page 48 Table 4.1- Normative Data for Males and ages on Mastery of Batting.


Environmental Factors

  • Space/boundaries

  • Type of Equipment

  • Equipment laying around

  • Class Format

  • Reduce visual and auditory distractions

  • Time of Day/Duration

    Other things to think about..

  • Start and Stop Signals

  • How the student communicates with you

  • Level of Motivation

  • Level of Difficulty

  • Order of the assessments

  • Demonstrations


Assessments

  • When giving a student with a disability an assessment remember…

    • Autism

      • Use pictures for criteria

      • Give directions in chunks

      • Demonstrate cues

      • Positive behavior Reinforcements

      • Let student choose the color or texture of the equipment

      • Have set boundaries


Disabilities

  • Deaf/Hard of Hearing

    • Use visuals to give directions and criteria

    • Have students close to you

    • Model the skill

    • Provide extra demonstrations

    • Make sure the testing environment has adequate lighting

    • Avoid excessive noises

    • Give appropriate wait time

  • Serious Emotional Disturbance

    • Have a calm environment

    • Lots of Praise

    • Give students more time to practice

    • Assess individually

    • Use visual aids


Disabilities

  • Intellectual Disabilities

    • Give directions in chunks

    • Model Skills

    • Give appropriate wait time

    • Class Formats

    • Immediate positive feedback

  • Multiple Disabilities

    • Modify equipment

    • Modify criteria/what you are assessing/ Is it appropriate?

    • Think Safety First

  • Visual Impairments

    • Think Safety

    • Use tactile or Auditory Boundaries

    • Modify Equipment

    • Give specific verbal directions

    • Translate directions into Braille


Disabilities

  • Orthopedic Impairment

    • Use assistive technology

    • Modify Equipment

    • Know your student

  • Deaf-Blindness

    • Think Safety

    • Use tactile or Auditory Boundaries

    • Modify Equipment

    • Give specific verbal directions

    • Translate directions into Braille

    • Have students close to you

    • Model the skill

    • Provide extra demonstrations

    • Make sure the learning environment has adequate lighting

    • Avoid excessive noises

    • Give appropriate wait time


Disabilities

  • Specific Learning Disability

    • Use visuals

    • Give directions in chunks

    • Clear directions

    • Demonstrate

    • Positive feedback

  • Speech or Language Impairment

    • Give directions in chunks

    • Demonstrate

    • Give appropriate wait time- Do not rush the student

    • Use visual s

  • Traumatic Brain Injury

    • Safety- Soft equipment

    • Clear Boundary lines

    • Give appropriate wait time


Disabilities

  • Other Health Impairments

    • ADD/ADHD

      • Give Breaks

      • Break Up Assessments

      • Have an assessment schedule

    • Obesity

      • Give Rest Breaks

      • Positive Feedback

    • Type 1 Diabetes

      • Watch for fatigue

      • Water Breaks

      • Use visuals

      • Demonstrate


Disabilities

  • Other Health Impairments

    • Rheumatic Arthritis

      • Be aware of the amount of stress on joints

      • Less Trials

      • Be mindful when weight lifting

    • Asthma

      • Be mindful of how much you are assessing

    • Sickle Cell/ Leukemia/ Tourette's Syndrome

      • Provide Rest and Water Breaks


Summary

  • Assessment is used to make identification, placement, and instructional decisions.

  • All assessments must be reliable and valid

  • Assessment is important for students with disabilities.


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