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Science Leadership Network. Please complete the “Science and Engineering Practices Implementation” handout and return it to the sign in table. Fall 2014. Framing the Day. high school. The Geologic History of Science Education in the State of Washington. Washington State Transition Plan.

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Science leadership network

Science Leadership Network

Please complete the “Science and Engineering Practices Implementation” handout and return it to the sign in table.

Fall 2014


Framing the day

Framing the Day

high school


Science leadership network

The Geologic History of Science Education in the State of Washington


Washington state transition plan

Washington State Transition Plan


Assessment timeline

Assessment Timeline


Goals

Goals

What does infusing some “Practices” and “Crosscutting Concepts” look like in “my classroom”?

  • Apply the practice of Developing and UsingModels to instructional design.

  • Connect the practices called Constructing Explanations & Designing Solutions, Engaging in Argument from Evidence to Developing and UsingModels and WA State Learning Standards (ELA).

  • Develop the capacity to engage all learners in classroom discourse and the public representation of their ideas.

  • Identify an appropriate student growth goal.


Is it developing and using models

Is It Developing and Using Models?


The milk chocolate melts in your mouth not in your hands

The milk chocolate melts in your mouth, not in your hands.


Human scatterplot the milk chocolate melts in your mouth not in your hands

Human Scatterplot

The milk chocolate melts in your mouth, not in your hands.


Grade level groups

Grade Level Groups

  • K-2

  • 3-5

  • 6-8

  • 9-12


Take a 15 minute break

Take a 15 minute Break!


Initial thinking model

Initial Thinking - Model

  • Draw a labeled diagram that describes what you think happens to an M&M in your mouth and in your hand that supports your claim.

  • Use your best scientific explanation based on your current understanding.

  • What is happening before, during, and after the candy goes from your mouth to your hand?

  • Be prepared to share your ideas.


Competing ideas

Competing Ideas

  • How does your explanation differ from others’ in the room? Or is it similar?

  • What should your model include?


Dissolving vs melting

Dissolvingvs. Melting


More evidence

More Evidence


Science leadership network

Lunch!

Take care of important Building or Department conversations.Share the NGSS shifts you are infusing (or are considering) in your classroom this year


Adding to our model

Adding to Our Model

  • What new information can you include in your model?

    or

  • Is there anything you want to change in your model?

  • Consider…

    • What happened to the different parts of the candy?

    • What is happening at the particle level?

    • What is happening to the matter and energy?


Adding to our model sticky notes and language scaffolds

Adding to Our Model:Sticky-Notes and Language Scaffolds

Added to our model -

Revised our model -

Questions we still have -

We added….

Use the Sentence Frames!

We used to think….

We are wondering….


Reflecting on developing and using models

Reflecting on Developing and Using Models

  • How have your ideas changed?

  • Revisit the probe. Any new insights?

  • What should students at your grade band know and be able to do with the practice of developing and using models? (Appendix F p.6)


Science leadership network

http://tinyurl.com/isitmelting


Make your probe explanation cl ev r

Make Your Probe Explanation

Cl-Ev-R

Claim

  • Relevant

  • Stands Alone

    Evidence

  • Appropriate

  • Sufficient

    Reasoning

  • Stands Out

  • Link Between Claim and Evidence


Reflecting on formative assessment

Reflecting on Formative Assessment

  • Reflect on the use of the Sticky-notes and Language Scaffolds, the “Gotta-have” checklist, and your small group model:

    • as an illustration of developing and modifying models

    • as a formative assessment tool

  • Reflect on the use of the probe as an assessment tool.


Take a 10 minute break

Take a 10 minute Break!


Application to our classroom

Application to Our Classroom


In washington

In Washington…

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

8 Criteria - Teachers

8 Criteria - Principals

RCW 28A.405.100

Instructional and Leadership Frameworks

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

EducatorEvaluation

WAC

Student Growth Rubrics

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

g

A capital “G!” indicates that the guidance represents Washington state law (RCW) or rules (WAC).

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

A lower-case “g” indicates that the guidance represents research-based best practice but is not mandated by law or rules.


Reviewing key terms

Reviewing Key Terms

G!

RCW 28A.405.100

  • Student Achievement: The status of subject-matter knowledge,skills, understanding or performance at a given point in time.

  • Student Growth: The change in student achievement between two points in time.

It is student growth, not student achievement, that is relevant in demonstrating impacts teachers and principals have on students.


Science leadership network

Exhibiting collaborative and collegial practices focused on improving instructional practice and student learning


Follow a sequence

Follow a Sequence:

Determine the academic needs for the pertinent group (all-grade, one class, sub-group)

Determine which of those needs are enduring or transferable knowledge or skills

Determine which of those are in your control


Smart goal process for student growth

SMART Goal Process for Student Growth


Specific

SPECIFIC

  • Does the goal identify a specific area of need within the content, based on a learning standard?

  • Is the goal necessary for the next level of instruction?

  • Is the goal clearly written?


Measurable

MEASURABLE

  • Does the goal identify the sources of evidence/measures that will be used to show student growth?

  • Are the sources of evidence/measures appropriate for demonstrating growth for the identified area of need?

  • Are there two or more points in time indicated?


Appropriate

APPROPRIATE

  • Is the goal standards-based and directly related to the subject and students taught?

  • Does the content selected represent enduring skills, concepts or processes?


Realistic

REALISTIC

  • Is the goal doable, but rigorous enough to stretch the outer bounds of what is attainable?

  • Is there a good match between the goal and the level of rigor expected in the standards addressed?


Time bound

TIME-BOUND

  • Is there sufficient time within the interval of instruction to determine goal attainment?

The goal is bound by a timeline that is definitive and allows for determining goal attainment.


What should our goal be around

What should our goal be around?

  • What did we learn today?

    • Developing and Using Models

    • Engaging in Argumentation From Evidence

    • Constructing Explanations

  • What are some resources to assist you?

    • Public Representations

    • Ambitious Science Teaching


Supporting your work

Supporting Your Work

  • tools4teachingscience.org

  • Public representations of students’ thinking (PDF)


Getting feedback

Getting Feedback

  • Pass the goals around the table

  • Each participant provides specific feedback to the writer on how to improve the goal

  • Keep passing until the goal returns to the writer

  • Once the goals are back with the author, he/she rewrites them based on feedback.

  • Shares with a partner

  • All participants select their best goal, and write it on a sticky note. Post the note on the chart.


Monitoring student progress

Monitoring Student Progress

36


Between now and then

Between now and then...

  • Consider how you will monitor your students’ growth based on your written goal.

  • What strategies will you be implementing?

  • What evidence will you be able to share in January at our next meeting?


Goals1

Goals

What does infusing some “Practices” and “Crosscutting Concepts” look like in “my classroom”?

  • Apply the practice of Developing and UsingModels to instructional design.

  • Connect the practices called Constructing Explanations & Designing Solutions, Engaging in Argument from Evidence to Developing and UsingModels and WA State Learning Standards (ELA).

  • Develop the capacity to engage all learners in classroom discourse and the public representation of their ideas.

  • Identify an appropriate student growth goal.


Wrapping up

Wrapping Up

  • Complete your postcard reminder and place it on the table in front.

  • Take the AESD Survey found here...


Science leadership network1

Science Leadership Network

Fall 2014


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