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TEAM ADVSIOR: Mitch Tyler, MS PE Department of Biomedical Engineering PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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TEAM MEMBERS: Miguel Benson, Erik Bieging, Ross Gerber, Aman Ghotra, Abdikarim Mahamud Department of Biomedical Engineering. TEAM ADVSIOR: Mitch Tyler, MS PE Department of Biomedical Engineering. TEAM CLIENT: Tom Brazelton, MD, MPH Department of Pediatrics

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TEAM ADVSIOR: Mitch Tyler, MS PE Department of Biomedical Engineering

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Team advsior mitch tyler ms pe department of biomedical engineering

TEAM MEMBERS:Miguel Benson, Erik Bieging, Ross Gerber, Aman Ghotra, Abdikarim MahamudDepartment of Biomedical Engineering

TEAM ADVSIOR:

Mitch Tyler, MS PE

Department of Biomedical Engineering

TEAM CLIENT:

Tom Brazelton, MD, MPH

Department of Pediatrics

UW-Madison Hospital and Clinics


Abstract

Abstract

We propose a physical prototype of a gurney-compatible- child seat for transporting children in ambulances. Current seats do not recline; Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) must unstrap the child out of seat and remove the seat off the gurney to lay the child flat on the gurney for specific medical treatments. However, this procedure takes up valuable time (~3 minutes) and protracts the time it takes to reach the hospital. As a result, our prototype reclines, and eliminates the need to remove the seat off the gurney to lay the child flat on the gurney. Also, our prototype supports children (1-10 years old) of various anatomical features unlike current ambulatory child seats. Initial testing of four subjects (1-10 year old) have given promising results but more testing needs to be done to assess prototype’s mechanical and safety constraints. Also, we need to seek lighter yet robust material to fabricate future design of the child seat.


Background

Background

  • An estimated 5000 ambulance crashes annually [1]

  • Safest to transport children sitting up(<30 kg) in child seat attached to gurney in an ambulance [2]

  • For specific medical conditions, EMTs must unstrap child out of seat and remove the seat off the gurney to lay the child flat on the gurney [3]


Background motivation

Background/Motivation

  • Problems with Current Design:

    • Seat does not recline

      • Time consuming (~3 mins) because must remove the seat off gurney to lay child flat

    • Seat is bulky

      • Do not always carry seats in ambulances

        • Children more prone to injury


Problem statement

Problem Statement

Develop a safe and compact child seat for transporting children (6-30 kg) in ambulances that allows Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) to recline the child in the seat from the sitting position to the lying position when strapped onto a stretcher.


Design constraints

Design Constraints

The Child Seat:

1. Must be compatible with current stretchers;

2. Must secure a child (up to 10 year old)

-Mass: 6-30 kg

-Shoulder width:12.9-30.8 cm,

-Hip to shoulder height: 20-44 cm [4];

3. Must not restrict EMT’s ability to care for the child;

4. Must be cost-efficient and user-friendly;

5. Must be collapsible;

6. Must recline from 120-180 degrees;

7. Must be easily sterilized.


Overview of the design

Overview of the Design

  • We have incorporated four unique features that make the child seat more conducive to ambulance transportation:

    • Recline Lock

    • Sliding Strap

    • Back Rest

    • Leg Support

Overview of Design Concept


Recline lock mechanism

Figure A: Design Concept

Figure B: Prototype Model

Figure C: Prototype Model

Recline Lock Mechanism

  • Function:

    • Reclines the seat

  • Mechanism:

    • Similar to a hinge joint

    • 2 plates joined at center rotate freely about the joint

    • 1 plate permanently fixed to the seat while the other is attached to the back rest on a rail mechanism

    • Lock in position with pin

  • Materials:

    • Wood and Screws


Sliding strap anchor

Figure D: Design Concept

Figure E: Prototype Design

Figure F: Prototype Design

Sliding Strap Anchor

  • Function:

    • Used to adjust straps

  • Mechanism:

    • Latch secures slide in place

    • Over-center design allows for free hands

    • Deformable rubber disk for latch support

  • Materials:

    • Wood, Screws, Nails, Plastic


Back rest track

Figure G: Design Concept

Figure H: Prototype Design

Back Rest Track

  • Function:

    • Anchors back of seat to stretcher

    • Allows seat and stretcher to be reclined simultaneously

  • Mechanism:

    • Beam tracks on the back rest slide into groves in anchored back

    • Anchored back is strapped firmly to stretcher

    • Allows back rest to move relative to the stretcher while reclining

  • Materials:

    • Wood, PVC piping, screws


Leg support

Leg Support

  • Function:

    • Elevates patient’s legs if necessary

  • Mechanism:

    • Slides out from beneath base of seat

    • Supported metal rails fit into base of seat

  • Materials:

    • Wood, railing

Figure I: Design Concept

Figure J: Prototype Design


Materials and cost

Materials and Cost


Subject testing

Tested our prototype on four subjects from the following age groups:

1 year old

4 year old

6 year old

10 year old

Subject Testing

Figure K: 1 year old subject in upright position

Figure L: 1 year old subject in laying position


Testing cont

Subject Testing Results:

All 4 subjects fit well in seat

Easy to adjust seat with subjects in it

Difficult for one operator to adjust seat and straps simultaneously

Testing (cont.)

Figure M: 6 year old subject in upright position

Figure N: 6 year old subject in laying position


Future considerations

Future Considerations


Team advsior mitch tyler ms pe department of biomedical engineering

Acknowledgements:We would like to thank Dr. Tom Brazelton and his colleagues, and Biomedical Engineering Department for providing us an opportunity to work on this project. Also, we would like to thank our advisor, Mitch Tyler, for providing us feedback and pointing us in the right direction.

References:

[1] Safe Ride News. http://www.saferidenews.com/html/Spec_Amb.html

[2] Detroit News. http://www.detnews.com/2003/specialreport/0301/27/a11-68893.htm

[3] Brazelton, T. University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. Interview.

[4] Physical Characteristics of Children. http://www.itl.nist.gov/iaui/ovrt/projects/anthrokids/child.html


Ambulatory

AMBULATORY


Child safet

CHILD SAFET


Y seat

Y SEAT


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