The clause and sentence structure self test
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The Clause and Sentence Structure Self-Test. Identifying a Clause. Is this a clause? I ate three pieces of pie . Yes. Why?

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The Clause and Sentence Structure Self-Test

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The clause and sentence structure self test

The Clause and Sentence StructureSelf-Test


Identifying a clause

Identifying a Clause

Is this a clause? I ate three pieces of pie.

Yes. Why?

Ate is the verb. It is action since one can eat. I is the subject since it answers “Who ate?/What ate?” I ate. Since there is both a subject and a verb, it is a clause.


Identify clauses

Identify Clauses

Is this a clause? Running down the street

No. Why?

There is not both a subject or a verb.


Identifying a clause1

Identifying a Clause

Is this a clause? Because Susan ran late

Yes. Why?

Ran is the action verb since one can run. Susan is the subject since it answers “Who/what ran?” Susan ran. This group of words includes both a subject and a verb; therefore it is a clause.


Identifying a clause2

Identifying a Clause

Is this a clause? Theo driving the car

No. Why?

There is no verb. Driving is a ving without a helping verb; therefore it is not in a verb phrase. It is a participle (a verbal used as an adjective) describing Theo. “Which Theo?” The Theo driving the car. Since there is no verb, this cannot be a clause.


Identifying a clause3

Identifying a Clause

Is this a clause? Who sang for her mother

Yes. Why?

Sang is an action verb since one can sing. Who is the subject since it is a pronoun replacing the identification of the singer which answers “Who/what sang?” Who sang. Since there is both a subject and a verb, it is a clause.


Types of clauses

Types of Clauses

What kind of clause is this and why?

I ate three pieces of pie

It is an independent clause since it states a complete thought.


Types of clauses1

Types of Clauses

What kind of clause is this and why?

Because Susan ran late

It is a subordinate/dependent clause since it cannot stand alone as a complete thought.


Types of clauses2

Types of Clauses

What kind of clause is this and why?

Who sang for her mother

It is a subordinate/dependent clause since it cannot stand alone as a complete thought.


Because susan ran late i ate three pieces of pie

Because Susan ran late, I ate three pieces of pie.

Identify all clauses and explain why and what types they are.

Independent clause is I ate three pieces of pie because there is a verb (ate), a subject (I), and a complete thought.

Subordinate/dependent clause is Because Susan ran late because it has a verb (ran), a subject (Susan), a modifier, (adverb late modifying ran – “Ran how?” Ran late), and does not express a complete thought.

What kind of subordinate clause and why?

It is an adverbial clause since it modifies the verb ate from the independent clause. It answers “Ate why/when?” Ate because Susan ran late.

Comma alert! Why the comma?

Place a comma after an introductory adverbial clause.


Whenever i try my best earns me the highest grades

Whenever I try my best earns me the highest grades.

Identify all clauses and explain why and what types they are.

Whenever . . . best is a subordinate clause used as a noun – the subject of the independent clause. It has both a subject (I) and a verb (try). Best belongs because it is a direct object (“Try what/whom?” Try my best). The entire sentence, Whenever . . .grades, is an independent clause since it has a subject (Whenever. . . best which answers the question “What/who earns?” Whenever . . . best earns), and a verb earns since that is an action.

Comma alert! Why no commas?

No commas are used to separate the subject from the verb in a sentence. Since the first subordinate clause is a noun clause used as a subject, no commas are needed. (But a comma is needed after subject in the previous sentence since the sentence begins with an adverbial clause modifying are needed. It answers “Are needed when/under what conditions?” Are needed since the . . .subject.)


Mr miller who sang for my mother became part of our extended family

Mr. Miller, who sang for my mother, became part of our extended family.

Identify all clauses and what types they are.

Independent clause is Mr. Miller became part of our extended family since it has a subject (Mr. Miller), a verb (became), a complement (part as a predicate nominative since became is a linking verb =), and a prepositional phrase used as an adjective answering “Which part?” Part of our extended family. In addition, it expresses a complete thought.

Subordinate/dependent clause is who sang for my mother because it has a subject (who), a verb (sang), a prepositional phrase used as an adverb modifying sang since it answers “Sang why/under what conditions?” Sang for my mother, but it does not alone express a complete thought.

What kind of subordinate clause is it and why?

It is an adjective clause since it modifies Mr. Miller. It answers “Which Mr. Miller?” The Mr. Miller who sang for my mother.

Comma alert! Why are there commas?

Use a comma to set off all non-essential adjective clauses. The author has determined that the reader does not need to know Mr. Miller sang for my mother. If more than one Mr. Miller was in both the audience’s and authors’ prior knowledge, there would not be commas since it is essential to know which Mr. Miller is being included in this idea.


Types of sentences by structure

Types of Sentences by Structure

What kind of sentence is this and why?

I ate three pieces of pie.

There is one independent clause. Using the Types of Sentence by Structure Scoreboard, the score is 1-0; therefore, it is a simple sentence.


Types of sentences by structure1

Types of Sentences by Structure

What kind of sentence is this and why?

Mr. Miller, who sang for my mother, became part of our extended family.

There is one independent clause (Mr. Miller became . . .family). There is one subordinate/dependent clause (who sang …mother). Using the Types of Sentence by Structure Scoreboard, the score is 1-1; therefore, it is a complex sentence.


Types of sentences by structure2

Types of Sentences by Structure

What kind of sentence is this and why?

When I chopped down the tree which fell on my house, I dreaded calling the insurance company.

There is one independent clause (I dreaded . . .company) There are two subordinate/dependent clauses (When I . . . tree+ which fell . . .house). Using the Types of Sentence by Structure Scoreboard, the score is 1-2; therefore, it is a complex sentence.

Comma alert! Why is there a comma?

Use a comma after an introductory adverbial clause.


Types of sentences by structure3

Types of Sentences by Structure

What kind of sentence is this and why?

Quickly running to the store, I bought apples, and then I hurriedly returned home to prepare the meal.

There are two independent clauses (Quickly running . . .apples + then . . . meal). There are no subordinate/dependent clauses. Using the Types of Sentence by Structure Scoreboard, the score is 2-0; therefore, it is a compound sentence.

Comma alert! Why is there a comma?

Use a comma to set off a non-essential adjective clause (Quickly . . . store). Use a comma after each independent clause up to the conjunction in a compound sentence.


Types of sentences by structure4

Types of Sentences by Structure

What kind of sentence is this and why?

After we spent a sweet summer afternoon at the pool, the skies opened up, and those ominous clouds that we watched poured rain upon us.

There are two independent clauses (the skies opened up + those ominous . . . us).

There are two subordinate clauses. After . . .pool is an adverbial clause modifying opened answering “Opened when?” Opened after we spent . . . pool. That we watched is an adjectival clause modifying clouds answering “Which clouds?” The clouds that we watched. Using the Types of Sentence by Structure Scoreboard, the score is 2-2; therefore, it is a compound-complex sentence.


The clause and sentence structure self test

After we spent a sweet summer afternoon at the pool, the skies opened up, and those ominous clouds that we watched poured rain upon us.

Comma alert! Why are the commas where they are?

The comma after pool is used after an introductory adverbial clause. The comma after up is used after each independent clause up to the conjunction. There are no commas to set off the adjectival clause that we watched because that is a necessary part of the sentence’s idea. Necessary adjectival clauses do not use commas.


How did you do

How Did You Do?

If you have any questions or issues, please do not hesitate to Gaggle me or to come in during tutoring for extra support.


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