Grammar rule of the week
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Grammar Rule of the Week. Capitalize names of people, titles used in front of a person’s name, places, days, months, holidays, and special events. Vocabulary Word:. Altercation (n)—a noisy dispute. Sentence Correction:.

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Grammar Rule of the Week

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Grammar rule of the week

Grammar Rule of the Week

Capitalize names of people, titles used in front of a person’s name, places, days, months, holidays, and special events.


Vocabulary word

Vocabulary Word:

Altercation (n)—a noisy dispute

Sentence Correction:

The altercation on friday between joe and sam was recorded on cell phones and posted on the internet over the labor day weekend.


Journal 1 paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm up

Journal 1: (paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm-up)

Many names have special meaning or history. For example, the name Hannah means “favor” or “grace.” The name Vito means “life.” Write your own name. Who named you? What does your name mean? Does it have a special ethnic or religious significance? Are you named after someone in your family? If you could change your name, would you?


Grammar rule of the week1

Grammar Rule of the Week

Capitalize names of nationalities, languages, direction words referring to parts of the country, school subjects from the name of a country or followed by a Roman numeral, and the first and all important words in titles of books, etc.


Vocabulary word1

Vocabulary Word:

Ambrosial (adj)—delicious; fragrant; divine

Sentence Correction:

According to the cookbook, the food of greece, the food in southern greece is ambrosial.


Vocabulary word2

Vocabulary Word:

Ambulatory (adj)—walking or moving; alterable

Sentence Correction:

The french patient was ambulatory after the surgery; he fell in love with the american nurse.


Vocabulary word3

Vocabulary Word:

Apex (n)—highest point, summit

Sentence Correction:

The apex of the book around the world in eighty days was when the protagonist almost lost his bet.


Vocabulary word4

Vocabulary Word:

Appendage (n)—something attached to a larger item

Sentence Correction:

When traveling south on the highway towards cousin’s house in the north, I saw an accident where someone lost an appendage.


Journal 2 paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm up

Journal 2: (paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm-up)

To the naked eye, it looks like junk, but you know it’s precious: the beat-up stuffed animal you slept with every night as a kid, the raggedy baseball mitt you used in Little League, the tooth you couldn’t bear to throw away after it fell out. Choose a beloved object from your own childhood and explain why you feel sentimental about it or treasure it so much.


Grammar rule of the week2

Grammar Rule of the Week

Use apostrophes to show ownership, form contractions, and in place of omitted numbers in a year.


Vocabulary word5

Vocabulary Word:

Bedlam (n)—uproar; confusion

Sentence Correction:

The teachers class was bedlam; it took five administrators to control it.


Vocabulary word6

Vocabulary Word:

Bellicose (adj)—warlike; quarrelsome

Sentence Correction:

The students bellicose behavior made the teacher send him out of class.


Vocabulary word7

Vocabulary Word:

Billet-doux (n) – a love letter

Sentence Correction:

The billet-doux taped to Sallys locker wasnt the first one she had received from Tom.


Vocabulary word8

Vocabulary Word:

Bona fide (adj) – made in good faith; genuine

Sentence Correction:

The teenagers offer to wash the dishes was a bona fide one, even though he didnt follow through on it.


Journal 3 paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm up

Journal 3: (paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm-up)

An almost infinite variety of types of love exists. The love of parents for their children is very different from the love of brothers for their sisters, of wives for their husbands, of kids for their pets, and on and on. Choose two people in your life whom you love, and explain how your love for each of them is different.


Grammar rule of the week3

Grammar Rule of the Week

Fragments may lack a subject, verb, or both, or may be punctuated incorrectly to form an incomplete thought.


Vocabulary word9

Vocabulary Word:

Brouhaha (n)—hubbub; uproar; furor

Sentence Correction:

Creating a brouhaha in class.


Vocabulary word10

Vocabulary Word:

Buffoon (n)—a clown, comedian, or laughable person

Sentence Correction:

The buffoon in first period.


Vocabulary word11

Vocabulary Word:

Cacophonous (adj)—harsh-sounding or confused-sounding

Sentence Correction:

The cacophonous music was coming from.


Vocabulary word12

Vocabulary Word:

Cadence (n)—rhythm

Sentence Correction:

In cadence with each other, singing together.


Journal 4 paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm up

Journal 4: (paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm-up)

If you had to give up one piece of technology that you use all the time, what would it be and why? Do you think you’d be better off without it?


Grammar rule of the week4

Grammar Rule of the Week

A run-on sentence is two or more complete sentences written as though they were one sentence; a comma splice is a type of run-on with only a comma separating the two sentences.


Vocabulary word13

Vocabulary Word:

Circumvent (v)—to avoid by going around; to encircle; to outwit

Sentence Correction:

Many people believe that you cannot circumvent your fate, others believe that you have no fate and can make your life what you want it to be.


Vocabulary word14

Vocabulary Word:

Cogitate (v)—to ponder or think intently

Sentence Correction:

The teacher encouraged the students to cogitate about the answer to the question many students answered quickly.


Vocabulary word15

Vocabulary Word:

Comatose (n)—unconscious; inactive

Sentence Correction:

After the surgery, Tom was comatose, he was moved to intensive care.


Vocabulary word16

Vocabulary Word:

Conflagration (n)—large, destructive fire

Sentence Correction:

The conflagration in the mountains was the worst in history, the firefighters managed to extinguish it.


Journal 5 paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm up

Journal 5: (paraphrase the prompt in the space provided on your warm-up)

Suppose you win $10 million in the lottery, but there’s a catch: You have to donate half of the money to charity. What charity would you choose? What would you do with the money you got to keep?


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