module 10 creating traditional constructed response assessment items
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Module 10: Creating Traditional Constructed-Response Assessment Items. Essay (item-writing guidelines): Communicate desired extensiveness of response. restricted-response item extended-response item Choose “action verbs” carefully in the instructions .

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module 10 creating traditional constructed response assessment items

Module 10: Creating Traditional Constructed-Response Assessment Items

Essay(item-writing guidelines):

Communicate desired extensiveness of response.

restricted-response item

extended-response item

Choose “action verbs” carefully in the instructions.

Clarify time-limit and/or item-value parameters.

Avoid using optional items.

slide2
Developing scoring rubrics for essay items:
    • Avoid task-specific rubrics (stress skillmastery instead).
    • Share rubric with students in advance of assignment.
    • Score holistically or analytically(pp. 192, 193, & 196).
    • Establish evaluative criteria on which to determine an“overall impression” score (holistic).
      • Limit yourself to, say, 3 - 6 criteria.
      • Label criteria clearly and succinctly (e.g., neatness, completeness, accuracy, variety).
    • Create quantified scoring for the evaluative criteria (analytic).
      • Assign point values to each criterion. With Likert inventories or graphic rating continua, use an odd-numbered numerical scale (e.g., 1–3 pts. for younger child and 1-5 pts. for older child) & short verbal descriptors (e.g., 5 = exceptional, 4 = above average, 3 = average, 2 = needs improvement, 1 = unsatisfactory, 0 = no attempt/NA) with defining narratives for each numerical rating and its accompanying descriptive label.
      • Rank-order or weight evaluative criteria accordingly.
      • Convert rubric point-totals to numerical or letter grades.
slide4

Additionalscoring guidelines for essay items:

  • Always “mentally preview” students’ responses by composing a teacher-generated prototype.
  • Decide in advance about the importance assigned to mechanics of writing.
  • Score one item at a time for the entire class.
  • Evaluate student responses anonymously.
slide5

Short-answer (item-writing guidelines):

    • Use direct questions over incomplete statements.
    • Structure items to elicit concise responses.
    • Look for unique responses.
    • Position blanks judiciously when used in incomplete statements.
    • Limit the number of blanks for incomplete statements.
    • Keep all blanks equal in length.
slide6

Refer to comparisons between selected- and constructed-response tests.

slide7
Complete Self-Check 6 on pp. 201-202 and Extended Applications 1-5 and 7 & 8 on pp. 469–472.
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