STUDIES ON SHOT SLEEVE BEHAVIOR DURING USE TO IMPROVE ITS LIFE
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 29

Ladle PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 160 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

STUDIES ON SHOT SLEEVE BEHAVIOR DURING USE TO IMPROVE ITS LIFE. Stationary Platen. Ejector Platen. Ladle. Die Cavity. Hydraulic Cylinder. Shot Sleeve. Ejector Box. Plunger. Ejector Die. Cover Die. Stationary Platen. Ejector Platen. Ladle. Die Cavity. Hydraulic Cylinder. Shot Sleeve.

Download Presentation

Ladle

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Ladle

STUDIES ON SHOT SLEEVE BEHAVIOR DURING USE TO IMPROVE ITS LIFE

Stationary Platen

Ejector Platen

Ladle

Die Cavity

Hydraulic Cylinder

Shot Sleeve

Ejector Box

Plunger

Ejector Die

Cover Die

Stationary Platen

Ejector Platen

Ladle

Die Cavity

Hydraulic Cylinder

Shot Sleeve

Ejector Box

Plunger

Ejector Die

Cover Die


Ladle

Steel Shot Sleeves – Modes of Failures

Wash-out progressive loss of material because of corrosion and erosion

Soldering adhesion and buildup of aluminum to the surface of the shot sleeve

Deformation temperature gradients between bottom and top of the shot sleeve cause uneven thermal expansion

Gross Cracking caused by thermal shock or severe jamming of the plunger tip

Thermal Fatigue Cracking surface cracking caused by repeated thermal stress/strain

Heat Lossrapid heat extraction can cause premature solidification


Ladle

Damage Flow

Soldering

Wash-out

Distortion

Uneven friction

Plunger/sleeve damage

Plunger tip sticking

Aluminum blow by

Sleeve rupture

Sleeve and Plunger Replacement


Ladle

Basic Schematic of the Experimental Facilities

Ladle

Funnel

Cylinder

Launder

Sleeve

Furnace


Ladle

Experimental Facilities


Ladle

Experimental Facilities (another view angle)


Ladle

Timing of Operation

Cycle time 36 seconds

Ladle

Filling, 14 sec

Ladle

Arm Advancement, 7 sec

Pouring, 4 sec

Ladle

Plunger

Injection, 4 sec

Arm Retracting, 11 sec

Plunger

Tip Retracting

Ladle

Lubrication

Shot Sleeve/Plunger Tip


Ladle

Design for Accelerated Testing of Nitrided Shot Sleeve

Under pour hole area


Ladle

Under pour hole area

Design for Accelerated Testing of Shot Sleeves with (TiAl)N PVD Coating, Stellite #6 Insert and Thermal Sprayed Molybdenum Coating


Ladle

Shot Sleeve Failure – Damaged Area Under Pouring Hole


Ladle

Nitrided H13 Shot Sleeve - Temperature Measurement Under The Pouring Hole

0.060”

0.060”

Shot sleeve and plunger tip were both nitrided H13

> 1000 °F


Ladle

0.060”

0.060”

Nitrided H13 Shot Sleeve Temperature Measurement


Ladle

Pressure in Hydraulic Cylinder During Operation


Ladle

Schematic of the Washout/Soldering Testing Arrangement

Al jet from slit

ca. 70 in/sec

Cavity

Test Pins

Plunger

Shot Sleeve


Ladle

Schematic Diagram of the Accelerated Test Die

Gate

Test pin

Die cavity

Molten Aluminum

Plunger

Shot sleeve


Ladle

Test Pin, Test Pin Location and Casting Design

Pin location

Test pin

Casting

5

Biscuit

Runner

Gate

10


Ladle

Effect of Coating on Washout by Pin Testing

H13-Base

(TiAl)N PVD Multilayer Coated H13

Nitrided H13


Ladle

Washout Resistance of Slected Materials by Pin Testing

100 shots

100 shots

50 shots

100 shots


Ladle

Damage Evolution on Nitrided H13 Sleeve

600 shots

1000 shots

2200 shots

1600 shots


Ladle

The Mechanism of Soldering and Wash-out in Nitrided H13

  • Soldering initiates by intermetallic formation at aluminum-steel interface

  • Wash-out takes place by iron dissolution at aluminum -intermetallic interface

  • Both processes involve diffusion of aluminum and iron across the interfaces

Nitrided Layer

H13 substrate

x 100

Aluminum

Intermetallic

H13 substrate

x 200

x 50


Ladle

Damage Depth of Nitrided H13 Sleeve - Longitudinal Section Through the Area Under Pouring Hole

Soldered Aluminum

0.50" initial

0.33"

final

Steel

Shot Sleeve

Original ID surface

Thermocouple Hole


Ladle

TiAlN PVD Coating

  • Inert in molten aluminum

  • Relatively thick coating (10-12 mm)

  • Thermal conductivity similar with steel’s

  • Very high hardness/strength

  • Very low steel-coating friction coefficient


Ladle

Welded plug

Stellite 6 Welded Insert

  • Lower solubility in molten aluminum than Fe

  • Wear resistant

  • Thermal expansion and conductivity similar with steel’s

  • High hardness/strength

Steel plug with Stellite 6 weldment about 6 mm

Welded plug


Ladle

Methods For Improving the Shot Sleeves

Stellite 6 Welded Insert

Note: Dimensions are in inch.


Ladle

Molybdenum Thermal Sprayed Coating

  • Very low solubility in molten aluminum

  • Thicker than TiAlN PVD (~250 mm)

  • High thermal conductivity

  • Good hardness/strength

  • - Very good thermal fatigue properties

Pouring hole

Molybdenum thermal sprayed coating (250 mm)


Ladle

Depth of Damage vs. Number of Cycles

Nitrided H13

Stellite 6 insert

TiAlN coated

Molybdenum thermal spray


Ladle

Area of Damage vs. Number of Cycles

Nitrided H13

Stellite 6 insert

TiAlN coated

Molybdenum thermal spray


Ladle

CONCLUSIONS

  • The molybdenum coating provided the very best material for avoiding damage to the shot sleeve steel. The molybdenum held up longer than any other material. With an improved bond, the molybdenum coating would have lasted for a longer period of time.

  • The hard coating (TiAlN PVD) performed excellent manner as long as the coating was maintained. However, its thickness was limited to about 10 microns (0.01 mm). After this coating wore off, the behavior was that of the nitrided H13.

  • 3. Stellite 6 material showed considerable wear under the action of the molten aluminum alloy; cracking occurred in the weldment. The wear is the result of solubility of cobalt in molten aluminum.

  • 4. The nitrided coating of the H13 provided some assistance to withstanding the wearing and soldering effect on the H13 shot sleeve.


Ladle

Acknowledgements

This research work is supported by DOE funds provided through by Casting Metals Coalition program. The NADCA and the members of Die Materials Committee in that Association approved this work and provided background. The appreciation of this group of people is hereby acknowledged.


  • Login