Management of the Agitated Patient
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Management of the Agitated Patient Adam Watchorn July 28, 2011 PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Management of the Agitated Patient Adam Watchorn July 28, 2011. Learning Goals. Causes of Agitation Verbal De-escalation Physical Restraints and Conducted Electrical Weapons Chemical Sedation. Causes of agitation What are the most common causes of agitation in the ED? .

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Management of the Agitated Patient Adam Watchorn July 28, 2011

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Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

Management of the Agitated Patient

Adam Watchorn

July 28, 2011


Learning goals

Learning Goals

  • Causes of Agitation

  • Verbal De-escalation

  • Physical Restraints and Conducted Electrical Weapons

  • Chemical Sedation


Causes of agitation what are the most common causes of agitation in the ed

Causes of agitationWhat are the most common causes of agitation in the ED?


Causes of agitation

Causes of agitation

  • Organic

    • Substance related

      • Cocaine, Amphetamines, Alcohol

    • Medical conditions

      • Hypoxia, hypoglycemia, brain injury, pain stimulus, CNS infection

        • Rare: brain tumors, thyroid disorders, hyperparathyroidism, Wilson’s disease, Huntington disease

  • Psychiatric

    • Psychosis

      • Manic episode

      • Schizophrenia

  • Non-organic and Non-psychiatric

    • Personality disorders


Causes of agitation what causes of agitation can we reverse in the ed

Causes of agitationWhat causes of agitation can we reverse in the ED?


Reversible or potentially treatment conditions

Reversible or Potentially Treatment Conditions

GOT IVS

  • Glucose – hypoglycemia

  • Oxygen – hypoxia

  • Trauma – brain, pain

  • Infectious – meningitis, encephalitis

  • Vascular – stroke, SAH

  • Seizure


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

45M

CC: “I feel sick to my stomach”

PMHx: Smoker, ETOH

PsychHx: none

After waiting 45 min he left for a smoke

He returned and became angry, demanding to be seen and uttering threats

Staff tried to calm him but he left irate

Within minutes….this happened


Could this have been prevented

Could this have been prevented?


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

28M BIBP

Smashed store windows and lit car on fire

4 officers required to restrain him

He’s already TASERED twice

PMHx: Bipolar

Meds: Lithium, Celexa


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

He continues to struggle against 4 RCMP officers without any sign of tiring

Security is called to help

He is diaphoretic and extremely agitated and violent


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

When would you consider physical restraints?


Indications for physical restraints

Indications for Physical Restraints

Patients are not responding to verbal techniques, are not cooperative and refusing oral treatment plus

  • At risk to harming themselves or staff

  • Delaying diagnosis and treatment

DOCUMENT THIS!!!


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

What are some

complications?


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

Local trauma

Aspiration

Rhabdomyolysis

Positional Asphyxia

Complications of

physical restraints


I ve been tasered

I’ve been TASERED!

A) None

B) ECG

C) ECG, Troponins

D) ECG, Troponins, ECHO


I ve been tasered1

I’ve been TASERED!

A) None

B) ECG

C) ECG, Troponins

D) ECG, Troponins, ECHO


What evaluations are needed in the ed after a taser device activation

What evaluations are needed in the ED after a TASER device activation?

AAEM Clinical Policy Statement 2010

  • No support for routine laboratory studies, ECGs, or prolonged ED observation for ongoing cardiac monitoring in an asymptomatic awake and alert patient (Level of Recommendation: Class A)

  • “….no evidence of dangerous lab abnormalities, physiological changes, or immediate or delayed cardiac ischemia or dysrhythmias after exposure to TASER electical discharges of up to 15 seconds.”


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

The patient is now physically restrained but continues to struggle in the seclusion room

The nurses manage to get some vital signs

40.8, 156, 186/94

WHAT IS YOUR MANAGEMENT PLAN?


Management

Management

Medical Emergency: Resuscitation room

Agitation: Benzodiazepines +/- Intubation

Hyperthermia: COOL – fluids, ice

Acidosis: Bicarb 1-2 amps?


Despite your management plan he continues to struggle then suddenly goes limp

despite your management plan he continues to struggle then suddenly goes limp


Monitor shows asystole

Monitor shows asystole


Excited delirium syndrome

EXCITED DELIRIUM SYNDROME

Described in literature as a combination of:

  • Acute drug intoxication

  • Mental illness

  • Struggle with law enforcement

  • Physical, chemical or TASER restraint

  • Sudden unexpected death


Why do these patients die

Why do these patients die?

Multifactorial

  • Positional asphyxia

  • Hyperthermia and acidosis

  • Catecholamine-induced fatal arrhythmias

  • Stress cardiomyopathy


What s your favourite chemical sedation

What’s your favourite chemical sedation?


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

75M

Admitted 8 days ago for NSTEMI

36.5, 62, 136/74, 96%

Bizarre behaviour

Agitated and aggressive

Meds:

LWMH, B-blocker, ACEI, Statin, ASA

PMHx:

CAD, DM, COPD, Depression

Why is he agitated?

How would you manage this patient?


Oral is the best

Oral is the best!

Risperidone 2mg +

Ativan 2mg

Haldol 5mg +

Ativan 2mg


5 10 mg im q30min

5 – 10 mg IM q30min


Acute extrapyramidal syndromes

Acute Extrapyramidal Syndromes

Haldol injection IM = 5% chance

Higher with repeat injections

Cogentin 1-2 mg IV (IM,PO)

Benadryl 25-50 mg IV (IM,PO)


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

Should long QT intervals worry us?


Proportion of abnormal qt intervals dorm study

Proportion (%) of abnormal QT intervalsDORM STUDY


Is there a benefit of combining haldol and ativan

Is there a benefit of combining Haldol and Ativan?


Sedation more rapid with combination

Sedation more rapid with combination


Patients with eps symptoms

% PATIENTS WITH EPS SYMPTOMS


What medication works the fastest

What medication works the fastest?


Mean time to sedation min

Mean time to sedation, min


However no mention of side effects

However, no mention of side effects…..

Another study with MIDAZOLAM showed:

20% required supplemental oxygen

50% required rescue medication

BOTTOM LINE:

FAST but UNPREDICTABLE


Why would you choose olanzepine over haldol

Why would you choose Olanzepine over haldol?


Summary of chemical sedation

Summary of Chemical Sedation


Oral first risperidone 2 5 mg ativan 2 mg

Oral firstRisperidone 2.5 mg + Ativan 2 mg


Undifferentiated agitation 1 haldol 2 10 mg ativan 2 4 mg 2 midazolam 5 10 mg

Undifferentiated Agitation1) Haldol 2 – 10 mg + Ativan 2-4 mg2) Midazolam 5-10 mg


Agitation related to psychosis 1 haldol 2 10 mg ativan 2 4 mg 2 olanzepine 10 mg

Agitation related to psychosis1) Haldol 2-10 mg + Ativan 2-4 mg2) Olanzepine 10 mg


Management of the agitated patient adam watchorn july 28 2011

55M

BIBA collared/boarded

Fell down flight of stairs

Smells of Alcohol

GCS 12 (E3, V4, M5)

36.1, 76, 172/86

Large scalp hematoma

Becomes AGITATED and AGGRESSIVE to staff and pulls out his IV and and pulls off his collar

What are your management priorities?


Management1

Management

  • Agitation: Sedation  Intubation

    • Protect C-spine

    • Facilitate CT scan

  • Prevent Hypoxia and Hypotension


Take away points

Take away points

  • Your voice + Oral Meds when possible

  • Perform an early assessment because:

    • Agitation + Abnormal VS = emergency

    • Agitation + Head trauma = emergency

  • Be aware of the complications with restraints and chemical sedation

  • Choose your weapon wisely (Haldol, Ativan, Midazolam, Olanzepine, etc)


Questions

Questions

Thanks for listening!

Thanks to Colleen Carey!


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