Teaching and engaging computer literacy students in a digital environment
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Teaching and Engaging Computer Literacy Students in a Digital Environment. Bill Jaber, PhD and Mava Wilson, PhD Computer Information Systems Lee University, Department of Business. Background. Computer literate student population Varying degrees of literacy

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Teaching and engaging computer literacy students in a digital environment

Teaching and Engaging Computer Literacy Students in a Digital Environment

Bill Jaber, PhD and Mava Wilson, PhD

Computer Information Systems

Lee University, Department of Business


Background
Background

  • Computer literate student population

  • Varying degrees of literacy

  • Disengaged in the introductory course

  • Computer literacy classes not meeting needs

  • Met and discussed with the administration a new plan for the computer literacy courses


Student needs
Student Needs

  • Students largely disengaged

    • Students growing up with technology

  • Misunderstood surfing and social networking as computer literate

  • Experience indicated students not skilled in computer concepts

    • CISS 100 (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint)

    • CISS 101 (Excel and Access)


The plan
The Plan

  • Past computer literacy exam produced few passing scores

  • Developed two proposals for consideration

    • Plan 1 - The courses are going to be self-paced with a schedule using SAM and e-books/traditional textbooks

    • Plan 2 - The courses are going to traditional classroom setting

  • Presented these plans to Department Chair and Dean

    • The administrations elected to try Plan 1

  • Pilot in Fall 2010, Expanded Pilot in Spring 2011

  • Implementation in Fall 2011


The design
The Design

  • General Literacy Course

    • Pre/Post-Tests in Excel, Word, PP, Computer Literacy

      • Option to receive “P” by passing all four with 80+

        • No one was eligible Fall 2010 and Spring 2011

    • Fall 2010

      • SAM and e-book

      • Two sections

    • Spring 2011

      • SAM and B/W printed copy of textbook

      • TA for every 25 - 30 students

      • Tutoring Labs monitored by TAs

      • Two sections


The design cont
The Design (cont)

  • Business Literacy Course

    • Two regular sections (30 – 32 students) – Fall 2010

      • SAM and Printed textbooks

      • Pre/Post-Tests in Excel & Access

    • Two large sections (50 – 60 students) – Spring 2011

      • SAM and e-books

      • Added TAs for every 25 – 30 students

      • Added multiple tutoring labs monitored by TAs

      • Class divided into half - Students attend one day a week, plus labs

      • Pre/Post-Tests in Excel & Access


The design administrative issues
The Design (Administrative Issues)

  • Fewer Sections

  • Fewer Part-time faculty

  • Faculty Administrator responsible for all sections to maintain continuity between sections (especially SAM)

  • Tutoring Lab TAs/Coordinator

  • Scheduling Rooms for Labs

  • ROI vs Student Achievement/Satisfaction


The design class setup
The Design (Class Setup)

  • Calendar with DUE dates

  • Pre-Tests

  • Training (simulation; observe, practice, apply; not for grade)

  • Tutorials (simulation; up-to-three times; 10 chances per task; graded)

  • Projects (case problem; live in software; submit/receive feedback immediately; submit up-to-three times; graded)

  • Quizzes (second scenario; live in software; submit one time; graded)

  • Capstone Projects (cumulative; graded)

  • Post-Tests (graded as test)


The operation
The Operation

  • Attendance not required

  • Self-paced, meeting deadlines

  • Material completed = course completed

  • Help = mini-lectures / explanations

    • In class

    • TAs

    • Tutoring Labs

    • Via email

  • Pre/Post Tests In-Class


Student experience
Student Experience

  • No one passed all pre-tests

  • eBook/access codes slow purchasing

  • B&W book/access codes purchased quickly

  • Time to get into method of learning

Little attendance for 8:00 class

Student group attend class

SAM Very “picky” & doesn’t follow standards

Mac issues


Faculty experience
Faculty Experience

  • TAs mediated excessive emails to faculty

  • Tutoring labs minimized last minute “help” on due dates

  • Grading scale “curve”

Difficulty getting everything setup

Issues with access first few days

Important to have everything ready




The feedback cont
The Feedback (cont)

  • “really enjoying self-paced nature. With my schedule it makes it much easier”

  • “puts a lot of responsibility on the students…catch myself doing it last minute…a good grade it’s easy to attain…a matter of time management…”

  • “Like doing the assignments in SAM not from book” & “I love SAM!!! I hate SAM and the book together…” & “I love this kind of learning method. All CISS 100 classes should use SAM 2007”

  • “…wish training covered the whole project just not part…”

  • “…love not having to go to class in order to learn…”


The feedback cont1
The Feedback (cont)

  • “I like the way it works. …wasn’t so picky or would give a more definitive answer to ones that are missed” & “SAM… is temperamental…”

  • “format of class is excellent; SAM site is not always the best to work with…automated feedback on projects … obscure or confusing leading to some degree of frustration instead rather than learning”

  • “Do not like this way of learning. .. Feel like I am failing in the class because of the lack of one-on-one help. Yes, I can come to class but that one period can only do so much since we do everything outside of class. I’d rather have this be a lecture class explaining in a clearer way what is in each chapter…”


The feedback cont2
The Feedback (cont)

  • “…tutorials, case problems and quizzes are a bit of overkill. I definitely know the material by the time I am done with each section but can't help feeling like I've been asked the same question four or five times. I think it could be toned back a little bit and still learn the material well…”

  • “…to me, all the materials for this course helps me learn in the best possible way.”

  • “…the material covered in SAM is not sufficient for the Case Problems…. the instructions for Case Problems in the book are really confusing and SAM explains them MUCH better…”

  • “…assignments hard to complete on macbooks”


The feedback unexpected learning
The Feedback - Unexpected learning

  • 2010 - 87%

    • 12 - strongly agree

    • 8 - moderately agree

    • 3 - neutral

    • 0 - moderately disagree

    • 0 - disagree

  • 2011 – 72%

    • 26 - strongly agree

    • 29 - moderately agree

    • 10 - neutral

    • 3 - moderately disagree

    • 8 - disagree

  • Quick feedback on the Case problem projects is helping me to pay more attention to detail and reading instructions carefully


The feedback 2011 preferred method
The Feedback - 2011 Preferred Method

  • Doing Case Problems in:

    • 66 - SAM 85%

    • 12 - Course book 15%

  • Using an eBook vs Paperbook:

    • 9 - strongly agree

    • 10 - moderately agree

    • 19 - neutral

    • 8 - moderately disagree

    • 27 - disagree

26% preferred method

26% neutral

48% NOT preferred method


The feedback where did coursework occur
The Feedback - Where Did Coursework Occur?

  • General Literacy

    • 4 - in the classroom

    • 19 - in my dorm

    • 6 - at home

    • 0 - where I work

    • 8 - computer labs on campus

  • Business Literacy

    • 6 - in the classroom

    • 26 - in my dorm

    • 13 - at home

    • 1 - where I work

    • 32 - computer labs on campus


General literacy ta responsiveness helpfulness
General Literacy TA Responsiveness/Helpfulness

  • Inquiries Outside of Class

    • 3 - Poor

    • 3 - Fair

    • 8 - Good

    • 23 - Excellent

  • During Classtime

    • 2 - Poor

    • 1 - Fair

    • 11 - Good

    • 23 - Excellent

  • During Tutoring Lab Time

    • 2 - Poor

    • 1 - Fair

    • 11 - Good

    • 22 - Excellent


Business literacy ta responsiveness helpfulness
Business Literacy TA Responsiveness/Helpfulness

  • Inquiries Outside of Class

    • 5 - Poor

    • 9 - Fair

    • 27 - Good

    • 37 - Excellent

  • During Classtime

    • 2 - Poor

    • 8 - Fair

    • 28 - Good

    • 39 - Excellent

  • During Tutoring Lab Time

    • 2 - Poor

    • 10 - Fair

    • 27 - Good

    • 39 - Excellent


General literary pre post test results
General Literary Pre/Post-Test Results

  • Word - Positive increase - Highest grade 94%

  • 2010 Average increase 30% & 2011 Average increase 25%


2010 general literacy pre post test results
2010 General Literacy Pre-Post Test Results

  • Excel

    • Positive increase

    • Highest Grade 84%

    • Average increase 46%


2010 general literacy pre post test results1
2010 General Literacy Pre-Post Test Results

  • PowerPoint

    • Positive increase

    • Highest Grade 94%

    • Average increase 29%


Student classification
Student Classification

  • General Literacy

    • 18 Freshmen

    • 7 Sophomore

    • 6 Junior

    • 6 Senior

  • Business Literacy

    • 39 Freshmen

    • 28 Sophomore

    • 9 Junior

    • 1 Senior


The next phase fall 2011
The Next Phase - Fall 2011

  • Six sections of General Literacy

    • Online format duplicated across all sections

    • 50 students per section

    • Adjunct faculty facilitating

      • Student orientation

      • Monitor coursework

      • Answer email

      • Monitor/maintain gradebook

      • Student exceptions/makeup work

    • Tutoring labs with TAs

    • Pre/Post Test monitored in lab

  • Three large sections of Business Literacy

    • Two faculty

    • 50 – 60 students per section

    • One lab-assistant per section

    • Half of class attend one-day-per-week

    • Scheduled Tutoring labs with TAs

    • Pre/Post Test monitored in class


The future
The Future

  • Questions to be answered

  • Outcomes

  • Course Organization

    • Lab assistants

    • Class size

    • Tutoring Labs

  • Faculty Load/Administration


Questions
Questions?

Bill Jaber, PhD

[email protected]

Mava Wilson, PhD

[email protected]


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